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29/11/2019 - 11:08

Opportunities to study and research in Japan and Iceland

The Watanabe Trust Fund at the University of Iceland is now accepting scholarship applications for UI students to study in Japan and Japanese students to study at UI. Maintenance grants are also available to fund research stays for post-docs and other academic staff. Scholarships are available to both undergraduate and postgraduate students, as well as grants intended to support the exchange of academic staff. Students and academic staff from all schools can apply.

The Watanabe Trust Fund has provided eligible applicants with unique opportunities to study and/or conduct research in Iceland or Japan. This is the tenth allocation of scholarships/grants from the Fund. In the last allocation period, 24 students and academics were awarded funding. That year saw a record number of grants allocated from the Fund, which is based on one of the largest individual donations ever made to the University of Iceland.

The application deadline is 15 January 2020.

Students registered at the University of Iceland intending to take part of their studies at a Japanese university are eligible to apply for a scholarship. Students at Japanese universities intending to take part of their studies at the University of Iceland are also eligible to apply. Staff at the University of Iceland or at Japanese universities and research institutes are eligible to apply for grants. The Board of the Fund is responsible for selecting recipients.

Scholarships to cover maintenance costs will be provided in the form of monthly payments. Each scholarship is expected to be up to ISK 210,000 per month to fund a stay in Iceland or up to JPY 150,000 per month to fund a stay in Japan. Scholarship recipients staying for longer than one month will also receive up to ISK 200,000 to cover travel expenses. The Fund will not provide grants to cover tuition fees or other expenses.

Post-docs and other academic staff are also eligible to receive up to ISK 500,000 to fund shorter stays related to their academic work or research collaboration between the University of Iceland and educational or research institutes in Japan.

Scholarships/grants may cover up to nine months study abroad for undergraduate or postgraduate students. This period must be in the academic year 2020-2021.

Applications should be in English and submitted by email to ask@hi.is.

Final reports and testimonials from former recipients can be found on the Fund's website: sjodir.hi.is/watanabe_trust_fund

Toshizo Watanabe, who donated the Fund's founding capital, is an entrepreneur and one of the owners of Nikken, a wellness products company based in the USA. In his younger years, he was an exchange student at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, where he met Geir H. Haarde, the former prime minister of Iceland.

About the Watanabe Trust Fund

The Watanabe Trust Fund was founded at the University of Iceland in 2008, with the aim of strengthening academic ties between Iceland and Japan. The Fund provides Icelandic students and academics with unique opportunities to work and study at a Japanese university. The same applies to Japanese students and academics, who have the opportunity to come to Iceland.

Toshizo Watanabe, who donated the Fund's founding capital, is an entrepreneur and one of the owners of Nikken, a wellness products company based in the USA. In his younger years, he was an exchange student at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, where he met Geir H. Haarde, the former prime minister of Iceland. Watanabe received a scholarship to fund his study in the USA and was forever grateful to those who supported his education. By signing the Fund's charter, Watanabe said he wanted to repay the help he had received by establishing a fund to support young people to study abroad. He contacted Geir H. Haarde, his former classmate, with the idea of establishing a fund at an Icelandic university.

The Board of the Fund comprises Már Másson, professor of medicinal chemistry, who is also the chair, Toshizo 'Tom' Watanabe, founder of the Fund, and Kristín Ingvarsdóttir, assistant professor of contemporary Japanese studies.

Further information and application forms are available from the Watanabe Trust Fund website.

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