Regulation no. 1160-2015 | University of Iceland Skip to main content

Regulation no. 1160-2015

Regulation on doctoral study and doctoral degrees at the University of Iceland School of Humanities, no. 1160/2015

with subsequent amendments

Authorised translation

CHAPTER I.  General provisions.

Article 1.  Doctoral study at the School of Humanities.

It is possible to take doctoral studies at the School of Humanities in those subjects for which the relevant faculty and the School of Humanities deem the necessary facilities and specialist knowledge to be available, on the condition that the School board has approved the programme, cf. Chapter XII of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. The objective of a doctoral programme is to provide doctoral students with extensive and solid training in research, enable them to conduct independent academic work, acquire new knowledge and communicate it. [By writing and defending a doctoral thesis, students demonstrate their competency, skill and knowledge, as provided for in greater detail by Article 11.]1

[This Regulation on doctoral study]1 and doctoral degrees at the School of Humanities is established in accordance with Articles 47, 68, 69 and 70 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009 and Criteria and requirements for the quality of doctoral studies at the University of Iceland, approved by the University Council 3 May 2012.

[...]1

[Doctoral students and their supervisors must familiarise themselves with and comply with regulations on doctoral studies at the University of Iceland and current University Council resolutions on criteria and requirements for the quality of doctoral studies at the University of Iceland.]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 2.  Doctoral studies committee.

[The School of Humanities doctoral studies committee comprises the chairs of the faculty postgraduate study committees, a doctoral student representative, the School research director, and the School dean, who shall also chair the committee. The coordinator for doctoral studies is secretary for the committee. The committee shall consult the relevant department or faculty in all academic matters as appropriate. The committee may invite a faculty/department representative to attend a meeting in order to discuss matters regarding individual doctoral projects. The coordinator for doctoral studies shall act as the contact for doctoral students, doctoral committees and other faculty parties involved in doctoral studies.

The secretary of the committee is the contact between the School and the Graduate School for matters relating to doctoral students, under the authority of the committee chair. The chair of the doctoral studies committee, or the chair's proxy, shall represent the School of Humanities on the board of the Graduate School.

The School of Humanities doctoral studies committee shall oversee doctoral studies within the School and ensure consistency in work procedures and criteria, requirements and responsibilities that make up programmes and their frameworks. Following an academic discussion within the faculty/department in question, the committee shall discuss and process applications in accordance with Article 5 of this Regulation. The committee shall confirm study plans and research proposals and changes thereof, confirm choices of supervisor and others on doctoral committees and also choices of special tutors where appropriate, cf. Article 9. Having received nominations from the faculty in question and confirmation from the Graduate School, the doctoral studies committee shall appoint opponents, receive their verdicts and follow up requirements for improvement, should there be any. The committee shall also perform any other tasks regarding doctoral studies the School dean or School board may assign it.]1

If the committee disagrees on how to handle a matter relating to an individual doctoral project, the representative of that faculty at which the project is being completed may require the matter to be referred to the faculty for further discussion. The matter shall be referred back to the doctoral studies committee after the faculty's discussion. The doctoral studies committee shall make the final decision on the matter. [In the case of a tie vote, the chair shall cast the deciding vote.]1

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 3.  General admission requirements.

Upon completion of a Master's degree with a first class grade, or an equivalent qualification, a student may apply for admission to a doctoral programme in the subject in which the Master's degree was taken. A student who has completed a Master's degree or other equivalent qualification in a subject different to the proposed subject for the doctoral programme, from another University of Iceland faculty or another university with the equivalent of a first class grade, may apply for admission to a doctoral programme. In such cases, the doctoral studies committee, in consultation with the department/faculty and prospective supervisor, shall assess the applicant's academic background and research.

Before a final decision can be taken on an application, the proposed supervisor must have agreed to fulfil the role. [...]1

If the preparation of a prospective doctoral student is not equivalent to the preparation afforded by a Master's degree in the field, the doctoral studies committee (if it otherwise accepts the application) shall set requirements for further study as necessary, in consultation with the department/faculty and prospective supervisor. The doctoral student shall generally meet these requirements by completing courses and/or individual projects in the specialist field in question. Such additional or preliminary requirements must be recorded in the University student registration system. The supervisor shall determine when the doctoral candidate has satisfied these preliminary requirements and ensure this information is recorded in the student registration system.

Students wishing to commence a doctoral programme directly after completing a Master's degree may apply before they obtain their degrees if the faculty in question can confirm that they are likely to complete their programmes with a satisfactory level of performance by the end of the current semester. If an application is accepted on this condition, the student may commence doctoral studies. However, if the condition has not been met after one semester of the doctoral programme the student shall not be permitted to continue. The academic record for the doctoral programme is then closed in the University student registration system with no credits registered, and the student must apply again if he or she wishes to pursue the programme.

A faculty member of academic staff may not be admitted to a doctoral programme within that faculty.

[A faculty and/or department may set special admission requirements for doctoral studies, in which case they shall appear in the University of Iceland course catalogue.

Admission to a doctoral programme does not confer a scholarship grant.]1

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 4.  Application deadline.

[The School of Humanities accepts applications for doctoral studies for the autumn semester and the spring semester each year. Application deadlines are based on item 2, Article 69 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland and will be specifically advertised. The School of Humanities¬ will accept applications for doctoral studies after the advertised deadlines in exceptional circumstances.]1

1Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 5.  Processing of applications.

[Applications must be submitted to the University of Iceland Student Registration using a special electronic form available on the University website. Applications to doctoral programmes must be accompanied by certified transcripts of degree certificates and previous academic records, if the applicant studied elsewhere than the University of Iceland. Applications must also include a study plan and research proposal, with a general description of the research project, its aims and research questions, the student's academic reasons for undertaking the project, as well as a draft plan for the organisation of study. A statement of confirmation from the prospective supervisor must also be submitted.]1

The School of Humanities Office reviews applications and ensures that the required information is enclosed. Applications shall then be sent to the [relevant department/faculty standing committee],1 which shall discuss them subjectively and submit a proposal to the doctoral studies committee as to whether they should be accepted or rejected. The department/faculty may demand a sample of essays by the applicant if this is thought necessary. In case of differences of opinion, the doctoral studies committee shall consult with the head of faculty concerning the processing of applications. [...]1

[...]1 An application shall be accepted or rejected on the basis of the applicant's academic foundation and a professional evaluation of the research project, the facilities and specialist knowledge within the faculty, and other factors (e.g. funding) which the faculty considers relevant if the prospective doctoral project is to meet set requirements, cf. Article 3. Students may only be accepted into doctoral programmes offered by the School's faculties, cf. specific faculty rules below.

Annual registration and payment of the registration fee are necessary prerequisites for commencing or continuing study.

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 6.  Number of credits and length of study.

Doctoral programmes at the School of Humanities are a minimum of 180 ECTS. However, it is possible to organise a doctoral programme of up to 240 ECTS following a Master's degree, cf. further provisions in the specific faculty rules below. The length of a 180 ECTS programme should be six semesters, or a maximum of ten. The length of a 240 ECTS programme should be eight semesters, or a maximum of twelve. The latter deadlines shall be based on a formal confirmation from the doctoral committee stating that it considers the doctoral thesis acceptable for defence. If the programme is not completed before the set deadline, a doctoral student may apply to the doctoral studies committee for an extension. Should such an extension be granted, this may be done on the condition that the doctoral student meet current requirements for doctoral study, despite having commenced the programme whilst other rules applied.

In exceptional circumstances, students may take leave from doctoral studies for up to one year at a time. The doctoral studies committee shall process applications for leave.[...]1

Doctoral students who have neither completed annual registration nor formally applied for leave from studies may apply to recommence doctoral studies. The doctoral studies committee shall take a position on such applications, having consulted the supervisor and department/faculty. Should such an application be accepted, this may be done on the condition that the doctoral student meet current requirements for doctoral study, despite having commenced the programme whilst other rules applied.

1Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 7.  Organisation of study and student progression.

Doctoral theses at School of Humanities faculties shall be assessed for 180 ECTS. A student enrolled in a 240 ECTS doctoral programme must furthermore complete 60 ECTS of general study before commencing, or alongside, work on the thesis, in accordance with a written study plan. This component may involve, e.g., courses, including reading courses and individual projects, at the University of Iceland or other universities, the composition of academic articles and lectures, university teaching, etc. Generally, all courses should be complete within two years of commencing the programme. Further provisions on this may be found in the specific faculty rules below.

[At the beginning of the programme, the doctoral student and supervisor shall produce a written study plan, not more than three pages long, stipulating the parties' mutual rights and responsibilities. The doctoral studies committee shall confirm the study plan. Any significant changes to the study plan (such as a change to the composition of the doctoral committee or a change of research topic that may necessitate a review of the composition of the doctoral committee) later in the doctoral programme are subject to confirmation from the doctoral studies committee.

The doctoral student must also submit a research proposal in the early stages of the programme. Students in a 180 ECTS doctoral programme shall submit their research proposals before the end of the second semester, whilst students in a 240 ECTS programme shall submit theirs no later than by the end of the third semester. The research proposal shall be a 4,000–6,000 word description of the proposed doctoral thesis. The proposal must outline the subject area, the questions that will be raised, and the research methodology. The thesis structure must be explained in detail. A draft bibliography shall accompany this description. Doctoral students must orally defend their research proposals before the doctoral committee, generally within two weeks of submitting it. Following this defence, the research proposal shall be sent to the doctoral studies committee for final confirmation. Any significant changes to the research proposal later in the programme are subject to the confirmation of the doctoral studies committee and must be based on explanations and reasoning approved by the doctoral committee. Should the majority of the doctoral committee consider the research proposal to be unsatisfactory, the doctoral student shall be asked to compose a revised research proposal or graduate from the programme with an M.Phil degree, cf. item 19, Article 69 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland.

The doctoral student shall submit a progress report after each semester, confirmed by the supervisor and the coordinator for doctoral studies at the School of Humanities. Credits cannot be recorded on the doctoral programme without confirmed progress reports.]1

Documents concerning the doctoral programme are kept on file by the School of Humanities Office.

Faculties may establish further rules concerning student progression and monitoring of such.

1Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 8.  Relationship between Master's and doctoral study.

A Master's thesis may not form the basis of a doctoral thesis, although students may continue in the same or a related research field.

Article 9.  Supervisor and tutor.

[Each doctoral student must, from the outset of the programme, have a supervisor who shall generally be a tenured member of academic staff at the University of Iceland faculty in question. A supervisor meeting the above description is generally also the student's tutor. The supervisor must meet requirements for supervisors at the University, cf. current University Council resolutions on criteria and requirements for the quality of doctoral studies at the University of Iceland.]1

Students may have a supervisor from outside the faculty but in this case they must also, from the beginning of the programme, have a tutor who is a member of academic staff at the faculty. Tutors for doctoral students must have completed a doctorate or equivalent. In such cases, the tutor shall monitor the work and progress of the doctoral student, with a view to ensuring the student has the same status as other doctoral students in the faculty and also that studies and supervision comply with this Regulation and Criteria and requirements for the quality of doctoral studies at the University of Iceland.

The role of the supervisor is to guide the student in the doctoral project and monitor its progression, as well as providing advice on the professional and academic context of the research and project. Doctoral students may consult their supervisors and tutors on the design of the research proposal, the organisation of the programme, choice of courses (if applicable), or anything else connected to their studies. The supervisor shall also assist the doctoral student with applications for research grants and facilities, e.g. with regard to research stays abroad. If the doctoral programme includes a 60 ECTS general studies component, the supervisor (and the tutor if applicable) shall advise the doctoral student on these studies. In certain cases, the supervisor shall also advise the student on individual projects. [...]1 Besides the supervisor and others in the doctoral committee, cf. Article 10, the doctoral student may receive guidance from other parties, having consulted with the supervisor and the tutor.

If the partnership between the supervisor and doctoral student does not work out as it should, one or the other or both may ask the doctoral studies committee that a new supervisor be appointed, in accordance with a faculty recommendation. Such an application shall primarily be evaluated on the basis of the reasoning behind it, with the possibility of finding another suitable supervisor also taken into consideration.

Should the main supervisor discontinue supervision of the doctoral student due to unavoidable circumstances, the faculty shall endeavour to assign a new supervisor.

1Amended by Article 8 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 10.  Doctoral committees.

[The supervisor shall propose members for the doctoral committee no later than by the end of the first semester, sending proposals to the faculty postgraduate study committee for approval. The composition of the committee is subject to confirmation by the doctoral studies committee. A doctoral committee shall comprise two to three specialists, as well as the supervisor, at least one of whom shall not be a permanent staff member at the faculty in question. The supervisor chairs the committee. If the tutor is not the same person as the supervisor, cf. Article 9, the tutor shall also be a member of the doctoral committee. The supervisor shall closely monitor the doctoral student's work and provide guidance until he or she considers that the thesis is ready to be defended. Other committee members shall evaluate the student's progression, make suggestions on drafts of the doctoral thesis and/or individual chapters, and provide guidance as necessary. The doctoral committee shall evaluate the research proposal submitted by the doctoral student, cf. Article 7. The doctoral committee and doctoral student shall meet as necessary over the course of the programme, but generally at least every six months in connection with submission of the progress report.]1

When the doctoral committee considers the thesis ready for defence it shall deliver a reasoned verdict, approved by all committee members, to the faculty, stating that the doctoral student may submit the thesis for defence. If the doctoral committee is not unanimous on this point, the majority shall rule and the chair shall have the deciding vote. [...]1

1Amended by Article 9 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 11.  Submission, presentation and format of doctoral theses.

A doctoral student shall present the research project and results in a thesis, which shall generally [be no more than 100,000 words in length.]1 The doctoral studies committee may, however, grant exemptions from this word limit in exceptional circumstances. Doctoral theses must comply with requirements concerning academic methodology and represent an independent contribution to the creation of knowledge in the field.

A doctoral thesis at the School of Humanities may be a single, integral body of work or a collection of articles. In the case that the thesis is a collection of articles, they must have been published or confirmed as accepted for publication in a recognised peer-reviewed outlet. They must focus on the same field of research and form a coherent whole. The student must compose a special overview or introductory chapter discussing the methodology and theoretical basis for the thesis as a whole, summarising the main content of the individual articles, presenting overall conclusions or linking their content using other academic methods. The articles, generally totalling 3–5, shall be presented essentially unchanged from the published/accepted versions.

[When the doctoral committee considers the thesis to be ready for defence and the School of Humanities Office has ensured that the doctoral candidate's academic record and the formatting of the thesis are satisfactory, the doctoral student shall prepare a proofread manuscript (the complete final version of the thesis) and submit a digital copy to the faculty.]1 The formatting and handling of sources must comply with recognised rules for academic writing. The logo of the University of Iceland must appear on the front page of the thesis. In the case of joint doctorates awarded with another university or universities, in accordance with an agreement thereon, the logos of both or all universities involved must appear on the front page of the thesis. The Centre for Research in the Humanities may establish further provisions regarding the appearance of theses in their rules of procedure. [The School of Humanities guidelines apply regarding formatting.]1

It must be clearly indicated that the project was completed at the University of Iceland. The names of the supervisor and others in the doctoral committee, the school and faculty must be included. Mention must be made of any University funds or other parties that sponsored the project, as well as institutes or companies the doctoral candidate has contacted regarding the project. Generally, the thesis must be written in Icelandic or English, with a short summary in both languages. The student must also compose a more detailed abstract in Icelandic if the thesis is written in another language, or in English if the thesis is written in [a language other than English.]1 If the thesis is written in a language other than Icelandic or English, the student must also include a [brief summary]1 in that language. The defence will generally be conducted in the same language as the thesis is written in.

[When the opponents have agreed that the thesis is fit for defence and the faculty in question has then determined that the doctoral defence will take place, the doctoral candidate shall submit a digital copy of the final version. Regarding formatting, the School of Humanities guidelines apply. After the title of Doctor has been conferred, the thesis shall be saved in the Opin vísindi database (opinvisindi.is), cf. Article 13. Should the author choose to close access to the thesis in Opin vísindi, he or she must submit one printed copy to the National and University Library of Iceland and one copy to the School of Humanities Office.]1

1Amended by Article 10 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 12.  Opponents.

[If the doctoral studies committee sees no reason why the thesis should not be submitted for doctoral defence, it shall appoint two opponents for an oral defence of the thesis, in accordance with nominations from the faculty and having received confirmation from the Graduate School. Opponents shall fulfil criteria regarding suitability and professional competency as specified by current criteria and requirements for the quality of doctoral studies at the University of Iceland. Only those who have completed a doctorate or equivalent may be opponents in a doctoral defence at the faculties of the School of Humanities. Opponents shall receive letters of appointment from the chair of the doctoral studies committee containing information on doctoral studies at the University of Iceland and guidelines for assessing the thesis and defence, no later than they receive a copy of the thesis for evaluation.]1

Opponents for the doctoral thesis must not have been members of the doctoral committee. The doctoral student and members of the doctoral committee must not directly contact the opponents regarding the doctoral thesis.

1Amended by Article 11 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 13.  Assessment and doctoral defences.

No more than two months after the opponents receive the thesis, they shall have sent a reasoned statement on whether they consider the thesis 1) fit for defence, 2) fit for defence subject to certain changes or 3) not fit for defence. If the opponents cannot come to an agreement on whether the thesis is fit for defence the doctoral studies committee may, in consultation with the department/faculty and the Graduate School, appoint new opponents.

If the opponents believe certain changes to the thesis to be necessary before it may be considered fit for defence, the doctoral candidate shall have the opportunity to respond to the criticism, amend the thesis and send the doctoral studies committee a new version. The committee shall send this version to the opponents. The new version must be accompanied by a statement on changes made in response to the opponents' comments. This must generally be done within six weeks of the opponents' initial response. The opponents must confirm for the doctoral studies committee that they consider the student's response to their criticism satisfactory before the doctoral defence can take place. The opponents should confirm this within two weeks of receiving the revised thesis.

[If the opponents do not consider the thesis to be fit for defence, the matter shall be referred to the faculty. The doctoral candidate shall always have the opportunity to revise the thesis or, if appropriate, submit a completely new thesis in collaboration with the supervisor and doctoral committee. Generally, new opponents shall be appointed to assess a new thesis.]1

Candidates not accepting the conclusions of the opponents may refer the case to the faculty, cf. Article 50 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009.

[The final version of the thesis must be sent to the opponents no later than four weeks before the defence takes place. It must also be made available in Opin vísindi or, if the author chooses to close access, the School of Humanities Office and the University Library up until the defence. The student is not authorised to make any substantial changes to the thesis after it has been deemed fit for defence. Provisions for the formatting of the thesis can be found in Article 11.]1

The doctoral candidate shall publicly defend the thesis on a date determined by the relevant head of faculty, generally no later than two months after the opponents have deemed it fit for defence. The thesis shall be assessed and defended in accordance with the regulations of the University of Iceland on doctoral studies. The head of faculty shall chair the defence. [...]1 Following the oral defence, the head of faculty, together with the opponents, shall decide whether the title of Doctor shall be awarded. If there is disagreement thereupon, the matter shall be referred to the faculty meeting. Student representatives at the faculty meeting do not have the right to vote on matters concerning the awarding of the title of Doctor. [Should the opponents and head of faculty decide not to award the title of Doctor, access to the thesis that has been published in Opin vísindi shall be closed.]1

Grades are not awarded for doctoral degrees.

1Amended by Article 12 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 14.  Connections with other universities and other University of Iceland schools.

Doctoral students may take part of a doctoral programme at University of Iceland faculties or schools other than where they are registered, other universities or recognised research or scientific institutes. A doctoral degree may also be jointly awarded with another University of Iceland faculty or school or another university. In such circumstances, consideration may be given to arranging the doctoral defence in accordance with the customs of both parties, as agreed on a case by case basis. The secretary of the doctoral studies committee shall manage communication with collaborating universities in consultation with the Graduate School.

Article 15.  Academic title.

A doctorate from a faculty within the School of Humanities, awarded on completion of a doctoral programme in accordance with this Regulation, confers the academic title of Philosophiae Doctor (Ph.D.). However, persons completing a doctoral degree in theology may choose between the academic titles Philosophiae Doctor (Ph.D.) and Doctor Theologiae (Dr. Theol.). The degree certificate shall [specify]1 in which subject the doctorate is.

1Amended by Article 13 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

CHAPTER II.  Doctoral degrees without a prior programme of organised study.

Article 16.  Doctoral degrees without a prior programme of organised study.

A doctoral degree without a prior programme of organised study involves the composition of a thesis or collection of theses and an oral defence, cf. Article 70 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. The doctoral candidate must have completed a Master's degree or equivalent qualification in the subject of the doctoral thesis, or a related subject. The doctoral thesis must comply with requirements concerning academic methodology and comprise an original contribution by the doctoral candidate to the academic discipline in question. A candidate may submit a collection of peer-reviewed articles which have been published or approved for publication, unless this is forbidden by the specific faculty rules. The articles must focus on the same main field of research and form a coherent whole. A special overview shall be compiled, summarising the material of the individual theses and drawing overall conclusions. For further details, see paragraphs 1 and 2 of Article 11 on the presentation and formatting of doctoral theses.
An application to undergo a doctoral examination must be addressed to the faculty concerned.

The application must be accompanied by a [digital copy]1 of the submitted thesis. The application must furthermore be accompanied by references from three parties regarding the significance that the thesis may have for the academic community and research in the relevant field. All referees shall be recognised experts in the academic field.

Should the thesis concern a branch of the humanities not studied at the University of Iceland, a faculty may refuse to assess the applicant’s thesis on these grounds.

[Should it prove impossible to find eligible evaluation committee members to assess the thesis, a faculty may refuse to assess the applicant's thesis on these grounds.]1

The head of faculty shall request statements from the relevant department/faculty on the thesis and accompanying references, and then submit a proposal to the doctoral studies committee on whether to accept the application. The committee shall determine whether the application meets quality requirements, e.g. with regard to the criteria that apply to doctoral study. Particular care shall be taken to ensure that the doctoral thesis includes a comprehensive discussion of the status of knowledge in the academic field in question. The committee may gather additional references, if needed, in order to evaluate the application, based on the criteria mentioned above. If improvements are needed the committee shall inform the applicant of this. Otherwise, having received nominations from the faculty, it shall appoint a three-person evaluation committee to assess the academic value of the written works accompanying the application. Only persons who have completed a doctorate or equivalent university degree may be appointed to serve on an evaluation committee, unless compliance with this condition is impracticable. Ideally, one or more members of the evaluation committee shall be external to the University, since opponents are generally evaluation committee members. The evaluation committee shall deliver a reasoned verdict to the doctoral studies committee in writing. The unanimous verdict of the evaluation committee, or of a majority of its members, must be unambiguous as to whether the thesis meets the requirements for a doctoral thesis. If the evaluation committee is not unanimous, the minority may explain its position in a separate verdict. If the evaluation committee is unanimous, it shall submit a single verdict.

If the majority of members of an evaluation committee agree that a work submitted by an applicant does not meet the requirements demanded of a doctoral thesis, the applicant shall not be permitted to undergo a doctoral examination. If the majority of the evaluation committee finds the thesis satisfactory, the doctoral studies committee, in consultation with the relevant faculty, shall determine whether the applicant should be given the opportunity to undergo a doctoral examination.

If the doctoral studies committee deems the thesis acceptable for defence it shall then appoint two opponents for the oral defence of the thesis, in accordance with faculty recommendations and [having received the approval]1 of the Graduate School. Opponents shall generally have been members of the evaluation committee. Article 13 of this Regulation shall apply to assessment and the doctoral defence.
Article 15 shall apply concerning academic titles.

1Amended by Article 14 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

CHAPTER III. [Faculty of Languages and Cultures.]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1155/2016.

Article 17.  Programmes and languages.

The [Faculty of Languages and Cultures]1 offers doctoral programmes in second language studies, Danish, English, French studies, Spanish and German. The doctoral thesis shall be written in the appropriate language.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1155/2016.

Article 18.  Number of credits.

A doctorate from the [Faculty of Languages and Cultures]1 shall be based on a doctoral thesis worth 180 ECTS.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1155/2016.

CHAPTER IV.  Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies.

Article 19.  Programmes.

The Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies offers a doctoral programme in theology.

Article 20.  Number of credits.

A doctorate from the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies shall be based on a doctoral thesis worth 180 ECTS.

Article 21.  Languages.

A doctoral thesis at the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies shall generally be written in Icelandic or English. It may, however, be possible to write theses in Danish, Norwegian or Swedish and use these languages for the doctoral defence.

Article 22.  Additional requirements for mag. theol. students.

Applicants for doctoral studies at the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies who have completed a mag. theol. degree at the Faculty must complete an MA programme at the Faculty. The programme shall comprise methodology courses at the Master's level (F-courses) in the School of Social Sciences and/or School of Humanities, totalling at least 20 ECTS, and a 30 ECTS research thesis. The research thesis may cover material related to the proposed doctoral thesis, cf. further rules for organisation of study in Master's and doctoral programmes at the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies. Up to 60 ECTS from a mag. theol. or cand. theol. degree may be transferred to an MA in Theology.

CHAPTER V.  Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies.

Article 23.  Programmes.

The Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies offers doctoral programmes in comparative literature, Icelandic grammar, Icelandic literature, cultural studies and translation studies.

Article 24.  Number of credits.

A doctorate at the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies is based on a 240 ECTS programme. This is divided into a 60 ECTS general component and a 180 ECTS doctoral thesis. The general component of the doctoral programme, alongside general training, is composed of formal courses, individual projects, lectures, academic articles and university teaching, as determined in further detail by the Faculty. [The Faculty shall publish criteria¬ for the evaluation of credits for individual parts of the general component.]1

The doctoral student's experience or preparation in the aforementioned academic fields before formally commencing doctoral studies may be taken into consideration. Courses that were part of the doctoral student's MA programme or courses the student may be obliged to take to meet preparation requirements, cf. Article 4, may not count as part of the general component of the doctoral programme.

The doctoral committee shall assess whether a doctoral student has completed the general component of the doctoral programme and submit its assessment to the doctoral studies committee for approval. Ideally, doctoral students shall complete any formal courses that they plan to take as part of their general studies as soon as possible and no later than by the end of the fourth semester, since they are intended to serve as preparation for writing the doctoral thesis. The doctoral student's supervisor shall ensure that the general component of the doctoral programme is not overly prolonged.

1Amended by Article 15 of Regulation no. 1032/2019.

Article 25.  Languages.

Doctoral theses at the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies shall generally be written in Icelandic or English, although students may apply for permission to write the thesis in another language, particularly in the case of a joint doctorate with a foreign university.

CHAPTER VI.  Faculty of History and Philosophy.

Article 26.  Programmes.

The Faculty of History and Philosophy offers doctoral programmes in archaeology, philosophy, history and applied ethics.

Article 27.  Number of credits.

A doctorate from the Faculty of History and Philosophy shall be based on a doctoral thesis worth 180 ECTS.

Article 28.  Languages.

Doctoral theses at the Faculty of History and Philosophy shall generally be written in Icelandic or English, although students may apply for permission to write the thesis in another language, particularly in the case of a joint doctorate with a foreign university.

CHAPTER VII.  Entry into force etc.

Article 29.  Entry into force.

This Regulation is established by the University Council in accordance with the authority of paragraph 3, Article 18 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008. This Regulation has been approved by the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Literature and Linguistics, the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies, the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies, the Faculty of History and Philosophy, the governing board of the School of Humanities and the Graduate School, cf. Articles 66 and 69 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. This Regulation enters into force immediately. At the same time Chapter III of Regulation no. 154/2011 on Master's and doctoral studies at the University of Iceland School of Humanities is repealed. Provisions concerning Master's studies in Regulation no. 154/2011 shall remain in effect until a new regulation on Master's studies has been established.

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