Regulation no. 140-2014 | University of Iceland Skip to main content

Regulation no. 140-2014

Repealed with Regulation no. 60/2019

Regulation on Master’s study at the University of Iceland School of Health Sciences, no. 140/2014

fwith subsequent amendments

CHAPTER I.  General rules at the School of Health Sciences.

Article 1.  Scope.

The Regulation on Master’s study at the School of Health Sciences is established with consideration of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. Chapter I contains framework rules for the School as a whole, whilst Chapter II details the specific rules of individual faculties.

Article 2.  Objective of study.

It is possible to take studies at the Master’s level at the School of Health Sciences in those fields for which faculties deem the necessary facilities and expertise to be available. Chapters XI of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009 shall apply concerning subjects and academic titles. The objective of a Master’s programme is that the student should receive a good overview of the subject and training in independent working methods and research, as well as a solid preparation for doctoral study and various employment.

The University of Iceland Graduate School shall oversee and follow up established standards and requirements for the quality of postgraduate studies at the University, cf. Article 66 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. Any information requested by the Graduate School must be supplied.

Article 3.  Standing committees.

Special standing committees shall operate within the faculties of the School of Health Sciences (science committee, research-based study committee, Master’s studies committee or other). A standing committee may serve more than one faculty, on the condition that all faculties in question have representatives on the committee. A standing committee shall handle matters relating to postgraduate study within the faculty or faculties in question. Its role is to, e.g., oversee the quality of Master’s programmes, address applications, approve changes to study plans and appoint external examiners where applicable, as well as performing any other tasks a faculty may assign it. A faculty may assign individual tasks of the standing committee to its departments.

If there is not a single common standing committee for all faculties within the School, the chairs of the standing committees for individual faculties shall regularly consult each other on matters relating to Master’s studies at the School.

Article 4.  Application deadline.

The application deadline for Master’s programmes is 15 April for domestic students and 1 February for international students. The application deadline for enrolment in the spring semester is 15 October.

Article 5.  Application.

Applications must be submitted to the University of Iceland Student Registration using a special electronic form available on the University website.

The following information must accompany applications:

  1. A statement covering the applicant’s academic goals and interests.
  2. A CV and academic record.
  3. The names of two referees.
  4. A certified transcript of a degree certificate, should the applicant have completed a Bachelor’s degree at a university other than the University of Iceland.
  5. The name of the applicant’s proposed tutor.

Faculties shall determine whether any other information must accompany an application.

Accompanying documents not in electronic form must be delivered to the faculty office. When the Student Registration has recorded the relevant information, applications are addressed by the faculty’s standing committee.

Following the committee’s discussion, applicants are informed of its decision and a notification is sent to the Student Registration. Applicants shall generally receive a written response within six weeks following the application deadline.

An applicant who fails to meet the faculty’s admission requirements will be rejected. Rejections must be well reasoned. The faculty’s decision shall be recorded in the Student Registration’s electronic system.

Students must register annually in March/April for each upcoming academic year, and pay the registration fee. Registration and payment of the registration fee are necessary prerequisites for commencing or continuing study.

Article 6.  Admission requirements.

Those applying for entrance into a Master’s programme must generally have completed a BS degree from the University of Iceland or another university. Generally, the undergraduate degree shall be in the same subject as the Master’s programme, but individual faculties may establish specific prerequisites in their rules on the organisation of study. Faculties may also introduce requirements regarding minimum grades. Such requirements must be approved by the faculty’s standing committee and publicised in the course catalogue.

Article 7.  Number of credits and length of study.

A Master’s programme at the School of Health Sciences is 120 credits, cf. Chapter XI of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. The Master’s thesis shall generally be worth 30-60 credits. Faculties may, however, authorise a thesis worth up to 90 credits subject to the approval of the standing committee of the faculty in question. Other credits shall be earned through participation in courses and seminars. All things being equal, a Master’s student may not take more than 10 credits in custom reading courses. The length of the programme should be two years (four semesters).

The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master’s degree is six semesters from the time of initial registration in the programme in question. Master’s students may, however, be registered in part-time study for up to four years. Each academic year, part-time students must complete at least half of the credits required for full-time study, and must complete the programme no later than four years after enrolling. Faculties may establish further regulations concerning student progression. Students must be registered and pay the registration fee for the duration of the period of study. Further provisions may be found in the specific faculty rules.

Article 8.  Undergraduate courses as part of a Master’s programme.

In exceptional circumstances, a faculty may allow a Master’s student to take undergraduate courses, although never totalling more than 20 credits. Thorough reasoning must be provided for such decisions. Minimum grades for undergraduate courses should be a whole grade higher than the stated minimum grade for the course in question.

Article 9.  Tutors and supervisors.

Each Master’s student shall be assigned a tutor from among the regular academic staff at the University of Iceland faculty in question. Students may consult their tutors on matters concerning their research projects, or anything else connected to their studies. The tutor, together with the student, shall submit a plan for the final project to be approved by the faculty’s standing committee. A supervisor shall assist the student with the final project. The tutor and the supervisor shall generally be the same person. Students may have external supervisors if these individuals meet the requirements stipulated in this Regulation. If the tutor and supervisor are not the same person, the tutor shall oversee the project and is responsible for ensuring that it conforms with the requirements of the faculty in question, whilst the supervisor shall provide the student with guidance in the final project.

Article 10.  Master’s degree committees and external examiners.

Special Master’s degree committees shall be appointed for theses worth 60 credits or more, in accordance with item 11, Article 69 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. This committee shall be composed of the supervisor and another individual, who shall generally be a member of teaching staff at the faculty in question. In exceptional circumstances, an external member may sit on the committee, on the condition that this individual holds at least a Master’s degree. The faculty standing committee shall appoint the Master’s degree committee. The role of the Master’s degree committee is to ensure the academic quality of the research work in accordance with faculty regulation, and also that the student’s progression is in line with the study plan.

The dean of the School of Health Sciences shall appoint one or two external examiners having received faculty recommendations. Only those who have completed a Master’s degree or equivalent qualification in the subject to be assessed and are recognised in their field may be appointed as external examiners. The role of an external examiner is to assess the Master’s thesis. Each faculty shall publish rules or criteria for the assessment of Master’s theses and the arrangement of assessment. An external examiner may not be a member of teaching staff at the University of Iceland. If no suitable examiner outside of the University can be found in Iceland who fulfils the aforementioned requirements, the dean is authorised to appoint someone from within the University to the position, having received a recommendation from the faculty.

Article 11.  Assessment and Master’s examinations.

The minimum grade for courses and the Master’s thesis is 6.0 unless the faculty determines otherwise, cf. Article 61 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. Where a Master’s degree committee has been appointed, it must submit a report on the student’s academic record, project and completed Master’s thesis to the standing committee. The standing committee shall discuss the thesis and report and determine whether the project shall proceed to defence.

Where the project is worth 30 credits, a student may complete a Master’s degree without a Master’s defence unless the specific faculty rules stipulate otherwise. The supervisor shall also award a grade. The grades awarded by the supervisor and the external examiner shall be equally weighted in the final grade. In other cases, a Master’s defence is held. An examination supervisor, appointed by the standing committee, shall preside over a Master’s defence. At the defence the student shall give a lecture on the project. Following the lecture, the student shall be examined. The external examiner(s) shall, together with the supervisor, evaluate the project and the student’s performance and award a project grade (0-10) or pass/fail grade. The student shall give a public lecture on the final project under the auspices of the faculty before graduating.

Article 12.  Submission and format of Master’s theses.

Three to five copies of the Master’s thesis must be submitted to the faculty. Faculties shall determine the thesis submission deadline.

With regards to the format of Master’s theses, students must comply with the guidelines of that faculty from which they will graduate.

The student must cover the cost of printing the thesis. An electronic version must be saved in the Skemman database. The faculty shall submit the thesis to the National and University Library.

Article 13.  Academic title.

A Master’s degree in accordance with this Regulation confers, as appropriate, the academic title of Magister/Magistra Scientiarum (MS), Master of Pharmaceutical Sciences (MS Pharm. Sci.) or Master of Science in Pharmacy (MS Pharm.), cf. Article 55 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009.

Article 14.  Connections with other faculties and other universities.

Students may take part of a Master’s programme at another university, a faculty within another University of Iceland school or a recognised research or scientific institute, with the approval of the faculty. A Master’s degree may also be jointly awarded with another university or another University of Iceland school.


CHAPTER II.  Specific faculty rules at the School of Health Sciences.

Article 15.  Specific rules on Master’s programmes at the Faculty of Nursing.

I. Standing committees.
The Faculty of Nursing meeting shall elect a three-person research-based study committee for a two-year term. The head of Faculty shall nominate committee members. The Faculty head may attend meetings of the research-based study committee. The committee shall operate under the authority of the Faculty Council. Students may refer any disputes with a Master’s degree committee to the research-based study committee.

The responsibilities of the research-based study committee are:

  1. To oversee postgraduate studies within the Faculty.
  2. To organise Master’s programmes in collaboration with Faculty teaching staff.
  3. To address applications.
  4. To nominate tutors.
  5. To approve changes to study plans.
  6. To appoint Master’s degree committees.
  7. To nominate external examiners for Master’s degrees.
  8. To organise Master’s defences.

II. Application.
Applications must be submitted to the University of Iceland Student Registration using a special electronic form available on the University website.

Students intending to conclude their Master’s degrees with a 60-credit final project shall find a supervisor and enter into an agreement with that person. Student must submit a description of the final project along with their applications.

On being accepted into a clinical programme, students will be allocated a tutor. At the start of the programme, students shall meet with their tutors to make a plan regarding academic specialisation.

Accompanying documents, not in electronic form must be delivered to the Faculty of Nursing project manager for postgraduate studies.

III. Admission requirements.
Applicants to the Master’s programme in nursing must have completed a BS in Nursing from the University of Iceland or an equivalent qualification with a first class grade (7.25).

Applicants to the Master’s programme in midwifery must have completed a Candidate’s degree in midwifery from the University of Iceland Faculty of Nursing or comparable studies with a first class grade (7.25) [and be licensed to practice nursing in Iceland.]2

[Applicants to the MS in Midwifery with Professional Recognition must have completed a BS in Nursing from the University of Iceland or an equivalent qualification with a first class grade (7.25) and be licensed to practice nursing in Iceland. Applicants must also have completed certain fourth-year courses in the BS in Nursing, as further specified in the admission requirements of the programme and information in the course catalogue.]2

[Admission of students to the MS in Midwifery with Professional Recognition is dependent on specific enrolment restrictions approved by the University Council.]2

IV. Number of credits and length of study.
The Master’s programme in nursing is 120 credits, cf. Article 97 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. [Up to 30 credits of those may be transferred from the BS programme in nursing.]1

[In addition, a student in the Master’s programme in nursing may have up to 20 credits transferred from comparable studies at the Master’s level taken outside the Faculty of Nursing, provided these studies are connected to the student’s research area.]1 The research-based study committee shall evaluate studies completed outside the Faculty on a case by case basis.

As a rule, students who have completed a diploma at the University of Iceland Faculty of Nursing can have the credits of the entire programme transferred, as far as possible. They shall, however, always be required to complete all core courses and comparable speciality courses. Clinical training is not assessed for credits in the Master’s programme.

[The MS programme in midwifery is 120 credits, following completion of the Candidate’s degree in midwifery from the University of Iceland or an equivalent qualification. Up to 30 credits of those may be transferred from the BS programme in Nursing. A student shall receive a further 42 transfer credits after completing the Candidate’s degree and requires 48 additional credits for the Master’s degree. The length of the programme should be one year (two semesters).]3

[The MS programme in midwifery with professional recognition is 120 credits, following completion of a BS in Nursing or an equivalent qualification.]3

V. Reading courses.
The research-based study committee must approve any reading course before it begins. The reading course must be in a research area which is related to the student’s final project, but is not part of the main project. The course consists of reading journal articles and other sources, chosen in consultation with teaching staff, and discussion of these sources with teaching staff. A reading course concludes with an essay. A reading course shall be subject to the approval of the research-based study committee.

VI. Master’s degree committees and external examiners.
For a programme that concludes with a 30-credit final project (a clinical Master’s programme), there is generally one supervisor for the final project. For a programme that concludes with a 60-credit final project (a research-based Master’s programme), a Master’s degree committee shall be appointed, consisting of two specialists, one of whom shall be the tutor. In cases where a tutor is not a supervisor, the latter shall also sit on the Master’s degree committee. More people may be appointed if considered necessary.

The research-based study committee shall nominate an external examiner who shall examine the student and evaluate the final project alongside the supervisor. One external examiner is nominated for Master’s defences at the Faculty of Nursing.

The external examiner must not be connected to the student’s research project. Only those who have completed a recognised university degree in the subject to be assessed and are recognised in their field may be appointed as external examiners.

VII. Submission and format of Master’s theses.
The Master’s thesis shall be submitted to the Master’s degree committee and the external examiner at least three weeks before the scheduled examination date. Formatting of the final project must be in accordance with the guidelines in the Master’s Student Handbook.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 109/2016.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1007/2018.
3Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1007/2018.

Article 16.  Specific rules on Master’s programmes at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Pharmacy

i. About the programme.
The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences offers an MS programme in pharmacy. The programme confers professional certification as a pharmacist. Teaching shall be provided in courses, which are assessed for credits. The MS in Pharmacy is worth 120 credits, of which the research project accounts for [40]2.

ii. Admission requirements.
To be eligible for the MS in Pharmacy an applicant must have completed a BS in Pharmacy from the University of Iceland or an equivalent qualification from another recognised university. In order to be admitted to the MS in Pharmacy, an applicant must have attained a minimum average grade of 6.5 in the aforementioned undergraduate studies.

iii. Student progression.
Students may not commence specific courses at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences without having successfully completed those courses specified as prerequisites in the course catalogue. In special circumstances, however, the Faculty may deviate from this rule. Before beginning work on the Master’s thesis, a student must have completed at least 40 credits of the MS in Pharmacy.

iv. Grades.
In order to receive an MS in Pharmacy, a student must receive a minimum grade of 5.0 in each course studied, as well as in all components of individual courses. For further details see paragraphs 4 and 5, Article 100 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. The student’s average grade from all courses must not be lower than 6.0.

v. Master’s project.
[A research project for a Master’s degree is worth 40 credits and shall generally be completed in the latter year of the Master’s programme.]2 The project shall equate to at least [20]2 weeks of full-time work on the part of the student. The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Master’s studies committee shall handle matters relating to Master’s projects under the authority of the faculty council. The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences’ specific rules on MS projects shall provide in greater detail for the choice of research project, the supervisor, formatting of the thesis and the Master’s defence.

vi. Academic title.
Completion of the MA in Pharmacy confers the academic title Master of Science in Pharmacy (MS Pharm.).

Pharmaceutical Sciences

I. About the programme.
The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences offers an MS programme in pharmaceutical sciences. Teaching shall be provided in courses, which are assessed for credits. The MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences is worth 120 credits, of which the research project accounts for either 30, 60 or 90.

II. Admission requirements.
Applicants to the MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences must have completed an undergraduate degree, a BS from the University of Iceland in pharmacy or a related subject, or an equivalent qualification from a domestic or foreign university. A student who has completed a degree from the University of Iceland should have attained a minimum main grade of 6.0 for a BS programme or equivalent. The Master’s studies committee shall evaluate qualifications from universities other than the University of Iceland.

III. Composition of study.
The programme involves training in scientific working methods. The size of the research project shall be determined in the study plan; it may be either 30, 60 or 90 credits. Other credits shall be earned through participation in courses, in accordance with an approved study plan. Participation in seminars within the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, worth four credits, is mandatory. The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Master’s studies committee shall organise the participation of the programme’s students in seminars. The course ‘Introduction to Pharmacy’ is a prerequisite or one of the courses that an MS student shall take.

IV. Grades.
In order to receive an MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences, a student must receive a minimum grade of 5.0 in each course studied, as well as in all components of individual courses. For further details see paragraphs 4 and 5, Article 100 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009.

V. Undergraduate courses as part of postgraduate study.
Undergraduate courses should account for no more than 20 credits. As a rule, more stringent requirements shall be made of Master’s students taking undergraduate courses as part of their programme. Students should pass these courses with a minimum grade of 6.0.

VI. Relations with other universities.
Students may take part of a Master’s programme at another university. Clear provisions must be made for the weighting of courses and projects at the University of Iceland and other universities in a study plan which shall be submitted to the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences for approval on enrolment.

VII. Assessment and Master’s examinations.
As soon as a thesis is submitted, a certified summary of the student’s academic record shall be made available for assessment by the Master’s studies committee. For an MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences, a student shall give a lecture on the research project, following which external examiners will have around an hour to examine the student. External examiners, along with the tutor and an examination supervisor appointed by the Master’s studies committee, shall assess the student’s performance and award a grade.

VIII. Submission and format of Master’s theses.
Master’s theses may be written in Icelandic or English. Master’s theses must meet the requirements of the University of Iceland Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. They must include a detailed introduction examining the status of research in the field, a description of the methodology used, the results, a detailed discussion and a bibliography, which shall be in accordance with general rules for scientific journals. If the student has written an article or articles for publication, these may be part of the thesis. The thesis shall mention the institute in which the research was conducted and also identify the tutor and supervisor. It must be clearly indicated that the project was completed at the University of Iceland and any funds that financed the project shall be identified. Students in research-based Master’s programmes must submit five physical copies of their theses and an electronic copy to the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences office no later than a month before the scheduled examination date. The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences will not cover any expenses related to the Master’s thesis.

IX. Academic title.
Completion of the MA in Pharmaceutical Sciences confers the academic title Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (MS Pharm. Sci.).

[Clinical pharmacy

1. About the programme.
The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences offers an MS programme in clinical pharmacy. Teaching shall be provided in courses, which are assessed for credits. The MS in Clinical Pharmacy is worth 90 credits, of which the research project accounts for 30.

2. Admission requirements.
To be eligible for the MS in Clinical Pharmacy an applicant must have completed an MS in Pharmacy from the University of Iceland or an equivalent qualification from another recognised university. In order to be admitted to the MS in Clinical Pharmacy an applicant must have attained a minimum average grade of 6.5 in the aforementioned studies. Furthermore, access to the programme is subject to a specific regulation on enrolment restrictions, as approved by the University Council.

3. Composition of study.
The programme is organised as a vocational programme at the Landspítali University Hospital and shall take 3 years for a student in 50% studies. Each student shall be assigned a supervisor at the beginning of the programme, who shall be responsible for the student for the duration of the programme. The programme is composed of two 30-credit mandatory courses, as well as a 30-credit research project.

4. Grades.
In order to receive an MS in Clinical Pharmacy, a student must receive a minimum grade of 5.0 in each course studied, as well as in all components of individual courses. For further details see paragraphs 4 and 5, Article 100 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. The student’s average grade from all courses must not be lower than 6.0.

5. Relations with other universities and hospitals.
For the most part, teaching takes place in the hospital pharmacy of the Landspítali University Hospital and its departments. Students may also have the option of studying temporarily at a foreign hospital, in accordance with a special agreement in each case. 

6. Assessment and Master’s examinations.
As soon as a thesis is submitted, a certified summary of the student’s academic record shall be made available for assessment by the Master’s studies committee. For an MS in Clinical Pharmacy, a student shall give a lecture on the research project, following which external examiners will have around an hour to examine the student. External examiners, along with the tutor and an examination supervisor appointed by the Master’s studies committee, shall assess the student’s performance and award a grade.

7. Submission and format of Master’s theses.
Master’s theses may be written in Icelandic or English. Master’s theses must meet the requirements of the University of Iceland Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. They must include a detailed introduction examining the status of research in the field, a description of the methodology used, the results, a detailed discussion and a bibliography, which shall be in accordance with general rules for scientific journals. If the student has written an article or articles for publication, these may be part of the thesis. The thesis shall mention the institute in which the research was conducted and also identify the tutor and supervisor. It must be clearly indicated that the project was completed at the University of Iceland and any funds that financed the project shall be identified. Students must submit five physical copies of their theses and an electronic copy to the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences office no later than a month before the scheduled examination date. The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences will not cover any expenses related to the Master’s thesis.

8. Academic title.
Completion of the MA in Pharmacy confers the academic title Master of Science in Clinical Pharmacy (MS).]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1157/2015.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 357/2017.

Article 17.  Specific rules on Master’s programmes at the Faculty of Medicine.

I. Objective.
The objective of a Master’s programme at the Faculty of Medicine is to provide students with scientific training following undergraduate studies. The Master’s programme shall increase academic knowledge and provide training in and insight into research methods in biomedical sciences, medicine and related fields.

II. Admission requirements.
To enrol in a Master’s programme at the Faculty of Medicine, a student must have completed a BS degree at the University of Iceland or other equivalent degree. [To enrol in the MS in Physical Therapy, a student must have completed a BS in Physical Therapy Sciences.]2 Students should have attained a minimum main grade of 6.5 for a BS programme or equivalent. Deviations may be made from the rule on minimum grades if the applicant has, e.g., demonstrated academic ability and/or ability in independent research. [Admission of students to the MS in Physical Therapy is dependent on specific enrolment restrictions approved by the University Council.]2

III. Number of credits and length of study.
A Master’s programme at the Faculty of Medicine is 120 credits. [A student in the second part of a programme in medicine, having completed a BS or Candidate’s degree in medicine, may have up to 15 credits in elective courses from that previous study count towards the Master’s programme.]1 Given normal student progression, the length of a Master’s programme should be two years and generally, the programme shall not take longer than four years. The maximum length of study for an MS in Physical Therapy, however, is three years. Students may from the outset enrol in a Master’s programme for four years and should then complete 30 credits per year. Upon graduation, it must be demonstrated that a student has been registered and has paid the registration fee for the entire period of study.

IV. Composition of study.
Study programmes involve training in scientific working methods and are composed of general and specialised courses, as well as the research project. Courses are either mandatory or elective. The main part of a programme is work on the student’s own research project and composition of a thesis based on this. A student shall submit a research plan using a specific form which can be accessed on the Faculty of Medicine website. The research plan shall include information on the current status of knowledge, a clear research question, methodology and organisation of work, and the student’s role in the project. A research plan for a project beginning in the autumn must be submitted before 15 April, or before 15 October for a project beginning in the spring. The size of the research project shall be determined in the study plan; it may be either 30, 60 or 90 credits.

A presentation of the project at a peer-reviewed conference is also considered training and may be assessed for credits on request. Presentations at conferences may account for a maximum of 4 of the 120 credits making up a Master’s programme. A Master’s student may take a maximum of 10 credits in reading courses under the supervision of teaching staff. The reading course must be in a research area which is related to the student’s research project but is not part of the main project. The course consists of reading journal articles and other sources, chosen in consultation with teaching staff, and discussion of these sources with teaching staff. A reading course concludes with an essay.

V. Changing from a Master’s programme to a doctoral programme.
Students who enrol in a Master’s programme but decide before finishing to take doctoral studies may request that the research-based study committee switch their registration from the Master’s programme to a doctoral programme. In such cases, students must submit a detailed progress report and take an oral examination under the auspices of the research-based study committee. The Regulation on doctoral studies and doctoral degrees at the University of Iceland Faculty of Medicine shall otherwise apply to such changes.

VI. Undergraduate courses as part of a Master’s programme.
A maximum of 25% of courses for a Master’s programme may be undergraduate courses. As a rule, more stringent requirements shall be made of Master’s students taking undergraduate courses as part of their programme. Students should pass these courses with a minimum grade of 6.5.

VII. Requirements of tutors, supervisors and other persons assessing studies and final projects.
A tutor must always be either a permanent member of teaching staff (lecturer, senior lecturer or professor) in the subject in question or a specialist who has passed an appropriate qualifications assessment. Supervisors of Master’s students must have completed at least a Master’s degree or equivalent in the relevant academic field. Care must be taken to ensure that students’ projects fall under the specialisations of their supervisors. Supervisors of Master’s students, whether they are permanent teaching staff at the University of Iceland or not, must be recognised experts in the field in question and have published works connected to the student’s project in an outlet that makes rigorous academic demands.

VIII. Master’s degree committees.
A Master’s degree committee shall comprise three persons with specialist expertise, one of whom shall be the student’s tutor. In cases where a tutor is not a supervisor, the latter shall also sit on the doctoral committee. The research-based study committee shall appoint the Master’s degree committee. The role of the Master’s degree committee is to ensure the academic quality of the research work in accordance with faculty regulation, and also that the student’s progression is in line with the study plan. The Master’s degree committee shall hold regular meetings with the student and approve progress reports which the student shall submit after every semester. Finally, the committee shall assess the Master’s thesis before it is submitted and deliver its verdict in writing to the research-based study committee.

IX. Submission and format of Master’s theses.
Master’s theses may be written in Icelandic or English. A Master’s thesis must include a detailed introduction examining the status of knowledge in the field, a description of the methodology used, an explanation of the results and a detailed discussion focusing on the project as a whole. The bibliography must be in accordance with guidelines for the formatting of Master’s theses. If the student has written an article or articles for publication, these may be part of the thesis, along with a detailed introduction and a discussion of the project as a whole. The institute(s) or companies where the research was conducted must be named in the thesis, as well as the supervisors. It must be clearly indicated that the project was completed at the University of Iceland and any funds that financed the project shall be identified. Regarding the formatting of the Master’s thesis, refer to the Faculty guidelines. Five copies of the Master’s thesis must be submitted to the Faculty of Medicine office no later than four weeks before the scheduled examination date. The Faculty of Medicine will not cover any expenses related to the Master’s thesis.

X. Assessment and Master’s examinations.
As soon as a thesis is submitted, a certified summary of the student’s academic record shall be made available for assessment by the research-based study committee. In the Master’s examination, the student shall give a 30-minute lecture on the research project, following which the external examiner(s) shall have up to 45 minutes to examine the student. External examiners, along with the tutor and an examination supervisor appointed by the research-based study committee, shall assess the student’s performance in accordance with a standardised checklist before awarding a pass or fail grade.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 922/2015.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1016/2016.

Article 18.  Specific rules on Master’s programmes at the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition.

I. Admission requirements.
To enrol in a Master’s programme at the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, a student must have completed a BS from the Faculty or an equivalent qualification recognised by the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition. The minimum grade for the BS is 6.5. Deviations may be made from this rule if a student has demonstrated ability in research work, e.g. by publishing scientific articles or meeting the study requirements of a fourth year of study following undergraduate studies.

II. Number of credits, composition of study and length of study.
An MS degree is awarded for the completion of a 120-credit Master’s programme, following the completion of a BS in Food Science or Nutrition or equivalent qualification.

Courses shall account for 30 or 60 credits and the Master’s project/research project for 60 or 90 credits. A study plan shall be produced under the guidance of the tutor and the Master’s degree committee and approved by the Master’s studies committee. Course credits shall be earned through participation in courses at the University of Iceland or other recognised institutes in accordance with the approved study plan. The maximum number of credits for reading courses overseen by a student’s supervisor is 18. Students wishing to deviate from the standard organisation of study or their original study plan must submit a new proposed study plan to the Master’s degree committee and the Faculty Master’s studies committee for approval. In exceptional circumstances, a student may apply for permission to take twice the amount of time to complete a programme that indicated by the rules, in which case the Faculty shall address this application before teaching begins in the autumn semester. In order to receive an MS degree, a student must have received a minimum average grade of 6.0.

Teaching for Master’s programmes shall be arranged such that a student can complete the programme in two years, following the completion of a BS degree. Students studying for a Master’s degree must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. Deviations may be made from this rule in exceptional circumstances, e.g. if part of the programme is completed through distance learning.

Upon graduation, it must be demonstrated that a student has been registered and has paid the registration fee for the entire period of study.

Article 19.  Specific rules on Master’s programmes at the Faculty of Psychology.

I. Postgraduate study committee.
The postgraduate study committee shall comprise 3-7 members, elected at a Faculty meeting for a one-year term. The majority of members shall be permanent teaching staff at the Faculty. The composition of the committee and number of committee members shall be determined by the Faculty meeting. The head of Faculty may attend committee meetings and chair them when appropriate.

[The postgraduate study committee shall oversee the MS programme in Applied Psychology.]2 The committee shall submit proposals concerning organisation of study and available study programmes to the Faculty meeting, address applications and submit proposals concerning student admission. The committee shall approve study plans and changes thereof, discuss and handle the appointment of supervisors and Master’s degree committees, monitor student progression and the quality of studies. The committee shall nominate external examiners, organise special examinations where appropriate and perform any other tasks the Faculty may assign it.

The School of Health Sciences doctoral studies committee and the Faculty Council shall oversee doctoral studies at the Faculty of Psychology, in consultation with the Graduate School.

II. Admission requirements and application documents.
To enrol in postgraduate studies in psychology a student must have completed a BS degree from the UI Faculty of Psychology with a first class grade or an equivalent qualification, as determined by the Faculty. An application is stronger if the applicant has demonstrated particular skills in research, studies or employment, for example by publishing scientific articles or through academic performance in a BS programme. In such cases, the postgraduate study committee is authorised to propose deviation from the absolute admission requirements. Before being formally admitted to postgraduate studies in psychology, the student may be obliged to complete BS courses or projects that are lacking in the opinion of the postgraduate study committee.

[Evaluations of applications shall take into account academic performance, grades, interviews, the applicant’s statement on academic and professional goals, references, as well as the Faculty’s ability to provide appropriate facilities and supervision. Admission of students to the MS in Applied Psychology is dependent on specific enrolment restrictions approved by the University Council.]2

III. Organisation of study, length of study and study requirements.
[The MS programme in Psychology is 120 credits following completion of a BS degree.]1 Courses, seminars, reading courses, training and special projects shall account for 60 credits and the Master’s project for a further 60 credits. The number of credits from postgraduate courses (F-courses), including distance studies, which are recognised by the postgraduate study committee, shall total at least 20. The maximum number of credits for special projects and custom reading courses is 20. The maximum number of credits for M-courses and G-courses outside the Faculty of Psychology is 20. All special projects, M and G-courses are dependent on the approval of the postgraduate study committee. The committee may set special requirements regarding minimum grades and credit value.

The student and Master’s degree committee shall jointly produce a study plan at the outset of the programme. Students should generally study full time and the length of study is four semesters. Students may apply for special permission from the Faculty to take up to twice this amount of time, in which case they shall be registered in 50% studies. In order to graduate with an MS degree, the student’s weighted average grade for all graded courses shall be at least 7.0.

[The MS programme in Applied Psychology is 120 credits following completion of a BS degree. Courses, seminars, special projects and vocational training shall account for 60-90 credits and the Master's project for a further 30-60 credits. The programme is divided into [four]2 different specialisations. [The specialisation in clinical psychology fulfils the provisions of Regulation no. 1130/2012 on the education required to be granted a licence as psychologist.]2 Students shall study full time and the length of study is two years (four semesters). Certain parts of the programme may take place in the summer following second-semester examinations. It is possible to apply to the Faculty for permission to take longer than four semesters to complete the programme. In order to graduate with an MS in Applied Psychology, the student’s weighted average grade for all graded courses shall be at least 7.0.]1

[...]2

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1016/2016.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1258/2017.

Article 20.  Specific rules on Master’s programmes at the Faculty of Odontology.

I. [Objective.
The objective of a Master’s programme at the Faculty of Odontology is to provide students with scientific training following a Candidate’s degree or BS degree. The Master’s programme shall increase academic knowledge and provide training in and insight into research methods in odontology and related fields.]1

II. Admission requirements.
To enrol in a Master’s programme at the Faculty of Odontology, a student must have completed a cand. odont. degree, a BS degree in a natural science or other equivalent degrees, as determined by the research-based study committee. Students should have attained a minimum main grade of 6.5 for a BS programme or equivalent. Deviations may be made from the rule on minimum grades if the applicant has, e.g., demonstrated academic ability and/or ability in independent research.

III. [Number of credits and length of study.
A Master’s programme at the Faculty of Odontology is 120 credits. Students who have completed a Candidate’s degree in odontology shall have 30 credits from that programme counted towards the Master’s programme. Students may receive up to 30 extra credits for predefined courses from the odontology programme. The minimum grade for any courses counted towards the Master’s programme is 6.0. With normal student progression, the length of the Master’s programme is one and a half years (three semesters) for those who have completed a cand. odont. degree, or two years (four semesters) for those with a BS degree. Generally, the programme shall not take longer than three years.]2

[IV. Composition of study.
The programme involves training in scientific working methods and is composed of general and specialised courses, as well as the research project. The main part of the programme is to work on the student’s own research project and composition of a thesis based on this. Students must submit a research plan using a special form no later than by the end of the first semester. The research plan shall include information on the current status of knowledge, a clear research question, methodology and organisation of work, and the student’s role in the project. The size of the research project shall be 60 credits. Other credits shall be earned through participation in courses, in accordance with an approved study plan. Courses are either mandatory or elective.

A presentation of the project at a peer-reviewed conference is also considered training and may be assessed for credits on request. Presentations at conferences may account for a maximum of 4 of the 120 credits making up a Master’s programme. A Master’s student may take a maximum of 10 credits in reading courses under the supervision of teaching staff. The reading course must be in a research area related to the student’s research project, but which is not part of the main project. The course consists of reading journal articles and other sources (chosen in consultation with teaching staff) and discussion of these sources with teaching staff.]3

[V. Research-based study committee.
The joint research-based study committee for the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Odontology shall handle matters relating to Master’s studies under the authority of the Faculty Council, on the condition that a Faculty of Odontology representative sits on the committee. The role of the research-based study committee is, e.g., to discuss applications, appoint Master’s degree committees, nominate external examiners for Master’s examinations and organise Master’s examinations at the Faculty of Odontology.]4

[VI.]3 Assessment and Master’s examinations. As soon as a thesis is submitted, a certified summary of the student’s academic record shall be made available for assessment by the research-based study committee. For a Master’s examination, students shall give a lecture on their research projects (around 40 minutes), following which external examiners will have around an hour to examine the student. External examiners, along with the tutor and an examination supervisor appointed by the research-based study committee, shall assess the student’s performance and award a pass/fail grade.

[VI.]4 Requirements of tutors, supervisors and other persons assessing studies and final projects.
A tutor must always be a permanent member of teaching staff at the Faculty of Odontology: a lecturer, senior lecturer or professor. If the Master’s student’s supervisor is not a permanent member of teaching staff at the Faculty of Odontology, this person must have completed at least a Master’s degree in the field. Care must be taken to ensure that students’ projects fall under the specialisations of their supervisors. Supervisors of Master’s students, whether they are permanent teaching staff at the University of Iceland or not, must be recognised experts in the field in question and have published works connected to the student’s project in an outlet that makes rigorous academic demands.

[VIII.]5 Master’s degree committees.
A Master’s degree committee shall comprise three persons with specialist expertise, one of whom shall be the student’s tutor. In cases where a tutor is not a supervisor, the latter shall also sit on the doctoral committee. The research-based study committee shall appoint the Master’s degree committee. The role of the Master’s degree committee is to ensure the academic quality of the research work in accordance with faculty regulation, and also that the student’s progression is in line with the study plan. The Master’s degree committee shall hold regular meetings with the student and approve progress reports which the student shall submit after every semester. Finally, the committee shall assess the Master’s thesis before it is submitted and deliver its verdict in writing to the research-based study committee.

[IX.]5 Submission and format of Master’s theses.
Master’s theses may be written in Icelandic or English. Master’s theses must include a detailed introduction examining the status of research in the field, a description of the methodology used, the results, a detailed discussion and a bibliography, which shall be in accordance with general rules for scientific journals. If the student has written an article or articles for publication, these may be part of the thesis, along with a detailed introduction and a discussion. The institute where the research was conducted must be named in the thesis, as well as the supervisors. It must be clearly indicated that the project was completed at the University of Iceland and any funds that financed the project shall be identified. The Master’s thesis must include an abstract in both Icelandic and English. Five copies of the Master’s thesis must be submitted to the Faculty of Odontology office no later than six weeks before the scheduled examination date. The Faculty of Odontology will not cover any expenses related to the Master’s thesis.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1097/2014.
2Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1097/2014.
3Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1097/2014.
4Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1097/2014.
5Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 1097/2014.

Article 21.  Entry into force etc.

This Regulation is established by the University Council in accordance with the authority of paragraph 3, Article 18 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008. This Regulation has been approved by the faculties and governing board of the School of Health Sciences and by the Graduate School, cf. Articles 66 and 69 of the Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569/2009. This Regulation enters into force immediately. At the same time, Regulation no. 517/2003, Regulation no. 239/2004, Regulation no. 340/2007, and Regulation no. 344/2007 are repealed.



University of Iceland, 22 January 2014.

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