Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 569-2009

REGULATION
FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND
No. 569/2009

ENTERED INTO FORCE 1 July 2009

with subsequent amendments

(last updated 11 January 2017)

Table of Contents

PART I

UNIVERSITY CENTRAL REGULATION

CHAPTER I
MAIN ORGANISATIONAL UNITS AND GOVERNANCE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND

Article 1. Organisational units of the University of Iceland
Article 2. The University Council and governance of the University of Iceland
Article 3. University Council representatives
Article 4. University Council meetings
Article 5. Role of the rector
Article 6. Election, appointment and eligibility for the position of rector
Article 7. University Council working committees
Article 8. University central administration
Article 9. Role of the University Forum
Article 10. University Forum representatives

CHAPTER II
SCHOOLS, FACULTIES AND INSTITUTES

Article 11. University schools and faculties 
Article 12. Role, operations and administration of schools
Article 13. Role of the dean of school
Article 14. Meetings of the school governing board
Article 15. Role, operations and administration of faculties
Article 16. Role of the faculty head
Article 17. Composition of the faculty meeting
Article 18. Faculty meetings
Article 19. Election of faculty head
Article 20. Faculty council 
Article 21. Departments
Article 22. School assembly
Article 23. Course catalogue and teaching committees
Article 24. Evaluation and assurance of quality of teaching and research
Article 25. University institutes
Article 26. Institutes under the auspices of the University Council
Article 27. Institutes under the auspices of schools or faculties

CHAPTER III
UNIVERSITY TEACHING AND RESEARCH STAFF

Article 28. Academic staff
Article 29. Decision on appointments
Article 30. Part-time positions
Article 31. Appointments
Article 32. Duties
Article 33. Sabbaticals
Article 34. Definition of positions
Article 35. Advertisement
Article 36. Exemptions from the advertising requirement
Article 37. Applications and their processing
Article 38. Promotion of teaching and research staff
Article 39. Transfer of research specialists, research scholars and research scientists to teaching positions
Article 40. Appointment and procedure of evaluation committees
Article 41. Assessment of applicants by the evaluation committee
Article 42. Evaluation committee verdict
Article 43. Processing of the evaluation committee verdict and concluding actions
Article 44. Appointment of selection committees
Article 45. Selection committee procedure
Article 46. Considerations for the selection of the most eligible applicant

CHAPTER IV
UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND STUDENTS

Article 47. Admission of students
Article 48. Enrolment of new students and annual registration
Article 49. Registration fee
Article 50. Procedures for student complaints and appeals
Article 51. Student rights and obligations and disciplinary sanctions

CHAPTER V
ORGANISATION OF STUDY, TEACHING, TEACHING METHODS, ASSESSMENT, EXAMINATIONS, ETC.

Article 52. The academic year, semesters and graduation
Article 53. Organisation of study, study programmes and assessment of study credit value
Article 54. Teaching, teaching methods, handling of sources and submission of final theses
Article 55. Academic titles and degree certificates 
Article 56. Examinations and examination periods
Article 57. Resitting examinations and withdrawal from an examination
Article 58. Implementation of examinations and examination rules
Article 59. External examiners and a student's right to receive explanations
Article 60. Examination questions and assessment of papers
Article 61. Grades, their storage and minimum grades
Article 62. Recognition of degrees from other universities
Article 63. Further rules
Article 64. Continuing education provided by University faculties and lifelong learning for the public
Article 65. Lifelong learning for the public

CHAPTER VI
MASTER'S AND DOCTORAL DEGREES

Article 66. University of Iceland Graduate School
Article 67. The title of Doctor and doctoral certificate
Article 68. Admission to doctoral study
Article 69. Organised postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees
Article 70. Doctoral degrees without a prior programme of organised study

CHAPTER VII
FEES FOR SERVICES, DISPOSITION OF FEES, CONTRACTS, ETC.

Article 71. Fee for services
Article 72. Non-governmental income and contracts
Article 73. Overhead charges
Article 74. Participation in enterprises

CHAPTER VIII
FUNDS TO SUPPORT RESEARCH, TEACHING AND ADMINISTRATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND AND STUDENT SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ACTIVITIES

Article 75. The University of Iceland Research Fund
Article 76. The University of Iceland Academic Affairs Fund
Article 77. The University of Iceland Equipment Purchasing Fund
Article 78. The University of Iceland Productivity Evaluation Fund
Article 79. The University of Iceland Union Fund
Article 80. The University of Iceland Assistantship Fund
Article 81. The University of Iceland Student Fund
Article 82. University of Iceland scholarship funds

CHAPTER IX
ANNUAL FORUM

Article 83. University Annual Forum

PART II
UNIVERSITY SCHOOLS AND SPECIFIC RULES FOR EACH UNIVERSITY FACULTY

CHAPTER X
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

FACULTY OF SOCIAL AND HUMAN SCIENCES
Article 84. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 85. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF SOCIAL WORK
Article 86. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 87. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF ECONOMICS
Article 88. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 89. Student progression, examinations, minimum grades and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF LAW
Article 90. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 91. Student progression, examinations, minimum grades and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Article 92. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 93. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (FACULTY OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION)
Article 94. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 95. Student progression, examinations, minimum grades and maximum length of study
Article 96. MBA programme

CHAPTER XI
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES

FACULTY OF NURSING
Article 97. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 98. Student progression, assessment, grades and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Article 99. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 100. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Article 101. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 102. Student progression, assessment, grades and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION
Article 103. Subjects, degrees and credits 
Article 104. Student progression, assessment, grades and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF PSYCHOLOGY
Article 105. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 106. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF ODONTOLOGY
Article 107. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 108. Student progression, assessment, grades and maximum length of study

CHAPTER XII
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES

FACULTY OF LANGUAGES AND CULTURES
Article 109. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 110. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Article 111. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 112. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF ICELANDIC AND COMPARATIVE CULTURAL STUDIES
Article 113. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 114. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY
Article 115. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 116. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

CHAPTER XIII
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

FACULTY OF SPORT, LEISURE STUDIES AND SOCIAL EDUCATION
Article 117. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 118. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF TEACHER EDUCATION
Article 119. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 120. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF EDUCATION STUDIES
Article 121. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 122. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

CHAPTER XIV
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND NATURAL SCIENCES

FACULTY OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
Article 123. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 124. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study
Article 125. MPM programme

FACULTY OF EARTH SCIENCES
Article 126. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 127. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Article 128. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 129. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Article 130. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 131. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES
Article 132. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 133. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

FACULTY OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
Article 134. Subjects, degrees and credits
Article 135. Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

CHAPTER XV
PUBLICATION OF REGULATION, PROVISIONS ON AMENDMENTS AND ENTRY INTO FORCE

Article 136. Establishment and amendment of regulation
Article 137. Entry into force
Temporary provisions
Explanatory provisions
 


PART I
 

UNIVERSITY CENTRAL REGULATION
 

CHAPTER I
MAIN ORGANISATIONAL UNITS AND GOVERNANCE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND
Article 1.  Organisational units of the University of Iceland

The University of Iceland is organised into schools, faculties and institutes under the auspices of the University Council, schools or faculties, cf. Chapter II of this Regulation. Departments may be organised within faculties. The names of organisational units within the University of Iceland shall be as stipulated in paragraph 2, Article 136 of this Regulation.

Article 2.  The University Council and governance of the University of Iceland

Governance of the University of Iceland shall be entrusted to the University Council and the rector. The University Council shall demarcate overall teaching and research policy and shape the structural organisation of the University. The University Council shall conduct general supervision of University, school and institute operations and shall be responsible for ensuring that the University operates in compliance with legislation and official edicts. University administration operates under the authority of the rector and the University Council. An internal auditor shall operate under the auspices of the University Council, in accordance with a formal statement of duties set by the University Council.

The University Council shall allocate funding for the University’s operating units, within the framework set by budgetary resources and regulation on disposition of independent income, and supervise University operations, including accounting, handling of finances and cooperative agreements. The University Council shall also supervise individual University institutes, shareholding companies, enterprises, funds and other University property, cf. Articles 5 and 26 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions.

[Under the authority of the rector and the University Council the central administration manages the University's accounting, including bookkeeping procedures, supervision of operations and the financial statements of cooperative agreements and research grants, entailing financial transactions and obligations on behalf of the University.]1

The University Council shall establish further regulation for the University as provided for in detail in the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008, including rules on fee collection and disposition in accordance with Article 24 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions, cf. also Articles 21 and 22 of the Higher Education Institutions Act no. 63/2006.

The University Council shall rule in matters concerning the University, individual schools and institutes affiliated with the University or under the authority of the University Council, schools or faculties.

The decisions of the University Council, in accordance with the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions and rules adopted by virtue thereof, are final and may not be referred to the University Forum or other University institute for reconsideration.

The University Council may seek the opinion of the University Forum on any subject concerning the operations of the University and its schools, faculties and institutes, cf. Article 9 of this Regulation.

Should the University Council be assigned the task of dealing with a matter concerning one school in particular, they shall seek the opinion of the relevant dean before the matter is concluded. The University Council shall likewise seek the opinion of the director of a University institute that is not under the authority of a school.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 3.  University Council representatives

The rector is an ex officio member of the University Council and shall also serve as its president.

[The University Council shall comprise the following ten members, in addition to the rector, appointed for a two-year term:

  1. Three representatives from the academic community, appointed by the University Forum.
  2. Two representatives appointed by the general association of students at the University.
  3. Two representatives appointed by the Minister of Science, Education and Culture.
  4. Three representatives appointed by representatives already appointed to the University Council.]1

For each representative indicated in items 1, 2 and 3 of paragraph 2, an alternate shall be appointed.

The [three]1 representatives indicated in item 4 of paragraph 2 and a single common alternate shall be appointed jointly by the rector and other representatives on the council indicated in items 1, 2 and 3 upon their appointment to the council for a two-year term. In appointing the representatives indicated in items 3 and 4, an effort shall be made to ensure the broadest possible base of knowledge and experience within the council in order to support the University; these representatives may not be staff members or students of the University. With the appointment of representatives accounted for in this paragraph, all seats on the University Council shall be considered to be filled.

The following rules (items a-d) apply to the appointment of representatives from the academic community indicated in item 1 of paragraph 2:

  1. the appointment of representatives from the academic community to the University Council shall be placed on the agenda of the University Forum for a meeting to be announced three weeks in advance. At this same time, an advertisement for recommendations/candidates shall be published on the University website. The University Forum’s meeting announcement shall also include an advertisement for recommendations/candidates. In order to stand for election, candidates must meet the requirements outlined in item b. It must also be evident that persons designated as candidates are willing to accept their nomination. Recommendations/candidacies must have been received by the Office of the Rector no later than eight days prior to the University Forum meeting. Recommendations/candidacies shall be submitted to the University Forum for consideration and resolution; they shall be sent out with the meeting announcement at least a week before the meeting of the University Forum.
  2. an individual chosen as a representative from the academic community for the University Council shall, at the time of appointment, be a member of academic staff at the University of Iceland, holding a full-time position (at least 75% employment). A dean of school, head of faculty or deputy head of faculty is not eligible to act as a representative. Information on professional field and a short career description (maximum A4 page) shall be made available to the University Forum.
  3. the University Forum shall choose between candidates standing for election (cf. item a). Each representative in the University Forum who is eligible to vote shall cast a written ballot for [three]1 of the candidates. Student representatives in the University Forum do not have the right to vote.
  4. [the candidate receiving the most votes in the University Forum election shall be appointed as a representative in the University Council. The candidate receiving the second-highest number of votes shall also be appointed as a representative, on the condition that this candidate work at a different school than the candidate receiving the most votes. The third candidate from the academic community shall be the one receiving the most votes in the University Forum, apart from the other two candidates and working at a different school than the other two representatives. The alternates of these three representatives shall be the three candidates receiving the most votes after the appointed representatives. The alternate receiving the highest number of votes shall be the alternate of the representative receiving the most votes, the second is the alternate of the second representative and the third is the alternate of the third representative. In the case of a tie vote, the outcome shall be determined by lot. An appointment is binding, and candidates are required to accept an appointment to the University Council for a two-year term.]1
  5. student representatives must be appointed in accordance with the results of a special proportional vote to take place in February every other year. Two representatives and two alternates shall be elected to the University Council for a two-year term.
  6. All students registered at the University of Iceland have the right to vote. The University of Iceland Student Council shall see to the holding of the election.

[Temporary provisions
Despite the provisions of items e and f, the University of Iceland Student Council shall elect two representatives and two alternates to the University Council for the period [1 July 2016 to 30 June 2018,]3 in accordance with relevant regulation set by the Student Council.]2

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1143/2011.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 605/2014.
3Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 550/2016.

Article 4.  University Council meetings

Meetings of the University Council are held as needed. The rector shall call meetings. Should three representatives in the University Council request that a meeting be held, the rector is obliged to call one. Council meetings shall be announced in writing or by email with at least three days' notice, if possible. The meeting agenda shall accompany notice of the meeting. [In exceptional circumstances a meeting of the University Council may be held online, in accordance with specific rules of procedure set by the University Council.]1

The rector shall chair council meetings.

A minimum of five council members with the right to vote must attend a meeting to constitute a quorum. Should an appointed or elected representative be unable to attend a meeting, the relevant alternate shall be invited to the meeting. The power of vote is decisive. In the case of a tie vote, the rector, or whoever chairs the meeting, shall cast the deciding vote.

Minutes shall be kept of meetings, in which decisions taken by the council shall be recorded. The rector shall appoint a secretary for the council, and oversee the publication of council minutes and announcements on decisions made.

The University Council shall elect a vice-president from among its members, who presides in the absence of the rector.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 921/2015.

Article 5.  Role of the rector

The rector is the president of the University Council. The rector is the head of University administration and the University’s ultimate representative and advocate in relation to individuals and institutions within and outside of the University. The rector shall preside over University operations and initiate comprehensive policy-making by the University Council on issues concerning the University. The rector is responsible for the realisation of University policy and the University’s relations with domestic and international partners. The rector is responsible for and shall exercise general supervision of all University operations, including recruitment and financial affairs within individual schools and institutes. The rector is responsible for the preparation of operational and financial plans and for their approval by the University Council. Between University Council meetings, the rector shall hold decision-making power in all University affairs.

The rector shall appoint a dean for each school, in accordance with University Council rules of procedure, and prepare the dean’s formal statement of duties.

The University Council may authorise the rector to employ one or more pro-rectors, in which case the rector shall prepare a formal statement of duties delineating the authority of the position.

The rector may appoint working committees to advise and assist in formulating policy and to perform specific tasks in accordance with a formal statement of duties.

The rector shall engage personnel to fill permanent academic positions at the University of Iceland, and promote members of academic staff.

The rector shall hire personnel for the University central administration and provide official statements of duties or job descriptions.

The rector shall make decisions in matters regarding the eligibility of individual members of University staff for involvement in particular cases handled within the University central administration, cf. Section II of the Administrative Procedure Act no. 37/1993. Should a meeting be held within a school, faculty or department, or by the board of a University institute, in order to prepare a case in which the rector shall make the final decision, the meeting in question shall decide whether any individual present is disqualified from involvement in the case. Should a dispute arise, the matter shall be referred to the rector and proceedings halted until a verdict is issued.

[The managing director of the administration shall, under the authority of the rector, supervise the University central administration.]1 Deans shall supervise operations and administration within schools. The rector shall consult regularly with deans of schools by holding deans’ meetings.

The rector shall arrange the publication of a yearbook in consultation with administrative staff, deans of schools, heads of faculties and directors of institutes, as suitable. The University yearbook shall include a report on the operations of the University, its institutes and funds and the use made of the funding which the University has had at its disposal; the report shall also cover student issues.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 544/2016.

Article 6.  Election, appointment and eligibility for the position of rector

[The Minister of Education, Science and Culture shall appoint a rector for a five-year term, in accordance with the University Council’s nomination.

The University Council shall produce a nomination following elections.

The following rules shall apply concerning the advertising for the position of rector, the election and nomination of the rector and eligibility for election as rector:

1. Advertisement
The University Council shall advertise the position of rector as open to applicants. The advertisement shall be published before the middle of December in the academic year when the term of appointment of the incumbent rector expires, with an application deadline of four weeks.

2. Eligibility requirements
In order to be eligible for the office of rector, applicants must have professorial competence, leadership qualities and a clear and ambitious vision for the University, excellent communication skills and extensive experience of management and policy-making. The University Council shall determine which applicants meet the requirements for eligibility.

3. Term of appointment
The rector shall be appointed for a five-year term, from 1 July to 30 June following the elapse of five years, cf. however item 11 of this Article.

4. Election board
When the application deadline for the position of rector has passed, the University Council shall appoint an election board. This election board shall consist of six persons, two from among the University’s students and four from the ranks of University staff; one of these staff members shall be appointed chair of the election board. In the case of a tie vote on the election board, the chair shall cast the deciding vote.

The election board acts on behalf of the University Council; its task is to oversee the compilation of the electoral roll, determine the election date, manage the holding of the election, rule on appeals concerning the election, and attend to other aspects of the election as provided for in detail in this Regulation.

5. Right to vote and weighting of votes
All those hired or appointed to a position at the University or its institutes, based on a valid contract of employment, shall have the right to vote in elections for rector. 75% employment or higher shall be considered a full-time position for the purposes of this Regulation, conferring a full vote. 37-74% employment shall confer half a vote. Lower than 37% employment shall not confer voting rights. Should an individual hold a position at 50% employment or higher, as well as a position at an institute with which the University has signed an agreement on cooperation within a field of science, this staff member shall be considered to hold a full-time position.

Academic staff members of institutes operating under special law and cooperating with the University of Iceland shall also have the right to vote. The cooperative agreement with the University shall stipulate the right of staff members to participate in the election of rector. The voting rights confer half a vote and pertain exclusively to staff members hired or appointed to their positions based on a qualifications assessment, in accordance with rules comparable to those applying at the University of Iceland. The aforementioned institutes shall, no later than four weeks before the election date, provide the election board with a list of those members of staff meeting the aforesaid conditions.

All students enrolled at the University of Iceland when polling opens shall have the right to vote. The votes of staff members shall altogether weigh 70% in the election, while the weight of student votes shall amount to 30%.

6. Electoral roll
The election board shall prepare an electronic ballot and compile the electoral roll. The electoral roll shall be published online three weeks prior to election day. Complaints must be submitted to the election board no later than one week prior to election day; the election board shall rule on these no later than one day before election day.

Should an individual meet the conditions for more than one electoral roll, the election board shall determine on which electoral roll that individual shall be. Should the individual not accept this decision, the individual may, prior to the deadline for submitting complaints, a week before election day, notify the election board as to the preferred electoral roll.

The Division of Human Resources shall manage the preparation of the electoral roll listing the staff of the University and its institutes. For the purposes of this Article, University institutes shall be defined as those institutes under the authority of the University Council, University schools or faculties, in accordance with regulation set by the University Council.

The Division of Academic Affairs shall manage the preparation of the electoral roll for University students.

7. Election
Election for rector shall be held no later than seven weeks after the deadline for applications. Election day should be as close as possible to 5 March, and adequately advertised within the University. Voting takes place online and polling shall be open for 72 hours, from 9 a.m. on the first day until 9 a.m. on the fourth day thereafter. Online voting shall be conducted in accordance with rules of procedure approved by the University Council. Counting of votes shall begin immediately upon the conclusion of polling.  

The applicant receiving the majority of valid votes in a general election held in accordance with the provisions of this Article shall be considered to be nominated to the position of rector. If no candidate receives a sufficient number of votes, a second election shall be held, one week after the results of the first round have been issued, between the two candidates receiving the most votes. In the event of two or more persons tying for second place, the outcome shall be decided by lot. A simple majority of votes shall determine the outcome of the vote between the two leading candidates. In the case of a tie, the outcome shall be decided by lot.

Should only one applicant meet the eligibility requirements for the position of rector, this person shall be chosen without election and deemed to have been nominated to the position of rector.

A rector may be re-elected.

8. Nomination
At its first meeting following the election, the University Council shall nominate, to the Minister of Education, Science and Culture, the candidate who has received the majority of valid votes.

9. Appointment
The Minister of Education, Science and Culture shall appoint the rector for a five-year term in accordance with the University Council's nomination.

10. Accession to office
The rector shall take office 1 July, cf. however item 11 of this Article.

11. Exceptional circumstances
Should the rector pass away or retire from office prior to the expiration of the five-year term, a new rector shall be elected as quickly as practicable. In such a situation, the University Council shall determine which professor of the University is to be appointed to temporarily perform the duties of rector. The same shall also apply should the rector be absent due to illness or granted leave from the position. Should the election of a rector in such a case take place before the appointment of the incumbent rector has expired, the newly elected rector shall be elected for a five-year term. What remains of the period from 1 July to 30 June when the new rector takes office shall be regarded as constituting one year.]1

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 7.  University Council working committees

The following working committees shall operate under the auspices of the University Council and the rector: the Finance Committee, Quality Committee, Equal Rights Committee, Academic Affairs Committee, Science Committee and the Salaries Consultation Committee. The arrangement of these committees and the number of members shall be determined by formal statements of duties set by the University Council. At least one member of the Quality Committee, Equal Rights Committee, Academic Affairs Committee and Science Committee shall be a student. Each of the committees shall have an advisory function in its specific area, but a committee shall have neither executive nor decision-making powers unless specifically mentioned in its formal statement of duties.

[The University Council shall appoint the Intellectual Property Committee of the University of Iceland and Landspítali - The National University Hospital of Iceland (Landspítali University Hospital) in accordance with the nominations of the rector, who shall nominate two members, and of the CEO of the Landspítali University Hospital, who shall nominate one member. The University Council and the CEO of the Landspítali University Hospital shall provide committee members with official statements of duties and confirm the committee’s operational rules.]1

[A special Complaints Committee for student issues shall operate within the University to discuss complaints and charges filed by students in accordance with Article 50 of this Regulation. In accordance with the nomination of the rector, the University Council shall appoint three representatives to this committee for a three-year term and another three alternate members. The chair of the committee must be a lawyer.]2

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 186/2013.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1077/2013.

Article 8.  University central administration

The role of the central administration is to enable schools, faculties, University institutes and University personnel to perform their duties in accordance with legislation and regulation for the University. The rector shall engage division heads and other central administration personnel. [The managing director of the administration shall, under the authority of the rector, lead the University central administration. He shall supervises the divisions of central administration, which are: Division of Operations and Resources, Division of Finance, Division of Academic Affairs, Division of Marketing and Public Relations, Division of Human Resources and Division of Science and Innovation.]1 Each division shall have a head of division. The rector shall provide management personnel with official statements of duties or job descriptions. The rector may furthermore, with the consent of the University Council, delegate responsibility for specific tasks under the purview of central administration to deans of schools, heads of faculties, directors of University institutes and chairs of University Council working committees. At regular intervals, the University Council shall arrange assessments of central administration operations.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 544/2016.

Article 9.  Role of the University Forum

The University Forum is a consultative forum for the University community, where discussion takes place on the development and advancement of the University of Iceland. The University Forum shall [formulate and present]1 the University’s central research and educational policy at the initiative of the rector and shall also provide statements, in accordance with paragraph 6 of Article 6, paragraph 1 of Article 9, paragraph 1 of Article 11 and paragraph 3 of Article 16 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008. The University Council shall charge the University Forum with addressing central academic matters and may seek the opinion of the University Forum on any subject concerning the operations of the University and its schools, faculties and institutes. The University Council may also charge the University Forum with discussion of professional matters and academic policy-making.

The University Forum is competent to pass resolutions on matters they consider relevant to the interests of the University community.

Committees and working groups may be appointed to work on issues at meetings and between meetings.

The University Forum shall nominate [three]1 representatives from the university community to the University Council, cf. Article 6 of Act no. 85/2008 and Article 3 of this Regulation.

The following business shall be addressed at the University Forum, as appropriate:

  1. University policy and performance, accounted for by the rector.
  2. Individual proposals submitted for resolution by the University Forum.
  3. Statements on regulation established by the University Council that must be submitted to the University Forum in accordance with the provisions of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions.
  4. Other matters raised in the manner prescribed by the regulation on the composition and rules of order of the University Forum.

The rector shall call University Forum meetings, and shall chair these meetings or delegate this duty to others. The University Forum shall meet at least once per semester. Should a two-thirds majority of University Forum representatives request a meeting, the rector is required to call a meeting.

A specific regulation, established by the University Council, shall detail the composition and rules of order of the University Forum.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1143/2011.

Article 10.  University Forum representatives

[The rector, deans of schools, heads of faculties and the chair of the Student Council ex officio members of the University Forum.]1 In the absence of the dean, the governing board of a school shall appoint a representative from its numbers to attend the University Forum. [The deputy head of faculty shall attend the University Forum in the absence of the head of faculty and the deputy chair of the Student Council in the absence of the chair of the Student Council.]1 Teaching and research staff from schools and University institutes shall also sit on the University Forum, as shall representatives from institutes operating under special legislation or with specific ties to the University. School representatives shall be elected at the school assembly, cf. Article 22 of this Regulation. The number of representatives shall be determined by special regulation established by the University Council, cf. Article 9 and paragraph 5 of this Article.

Two representatives from the Union of University Teachers shall also sit on the University Forum for a two-year term, elected by a written poll from union members not holding the position of dean or head; two representatives of University administrative personnel, elected by a written poll, shall also sit on the Forum for a two-year term. In addition, there shall be one student representative on the University Forum for every five representatives of other parties within the University; they shall be elected by a special poll for a [one-year term.]1

Members of the University Council who are neither ex officio members nor elected representatives of the University Forum may sit on the University Forum and have the right to propose a motion, but they do not have the right to vote. The rector may summon University administrative personnel, chairs of working committees and any other parties to attend the University Forum where considered necessary. They shall have the right to propose motions but not to vote.

The University Council shall establish more detailed rules on the number of representatives within the University Forum and their selection, cf. Article 9. These rules shall include provisions on election to and seats on the University Forum for representatives of other institutes and organisations beyond those listed in paragraphs 1-4, as well as on their right to vote.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 520/2016.

CHAPTER II
SCHOOLS, FACULTIES AND INSTITUTES
Article 11.  University schools and faculties

Schools are the primary organisational units of the University of Iceland. Each school is in turn divided into faculties, which are the basic units of the University. The schools and faculties of the University are as follows:

The School of Social Sciences: the Faculty of Social and Human Sciences; the Faculty of Social Work; the Faculty of Economics; the Faculty of Law; the Faculty of Political Science; and the School of Business (Faculty of Business Administration).

The School of Health Sciences: the Faculty of Nursing; the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; the Faculty of Medicine; the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition; the Faculty of Psychology; and the Faculty of Odontology.

The School of Humanities: [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures;]1 the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies; the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies; and the Faculty of History and Philosophy.

The School of Education: the Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education; the Faculty of Teacher Education; and the Faculty of Education Studies.

The School of Engineering and Natural Sciences: the Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science; the Faculty of Earth Sciences; the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences; the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering; the Faculty of Physical Sciences; and the Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

The University Council shall determine schools’ roles and limitations, and the division of tasks between schools. The University Council shall furthermore organise the division of schools into faculties, following the recommendations of the school in question.

Before making any fundamental changes to the structure of a school, a statement shall be sought from the University Forum.

1Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 12.  Role, operations and administration of schools

Teaching, research, administration and support services operate within schools. Schools are independent in academic and administrative matters, subject to those limitations outlined in the University’s central regulation. Schools are divided into faculties, cf. Article 11, which are responsible for teaching and research as well as providing teaching in individual subjects for the benefit of other schools and faculties where possible.

In organising study and research, the requirements of the relevant disciplines or programmes will also be taken into consideration. In order to fulfil these requirements, a school may divide various components of a programme between faculties and appoint special boards of study, representing those faculties involved, to manage issues relating to the programme in a manner comparable to that which applies to interdisciplinary studies, cf. Articles 53 and 62. The specific organisation of programmes of this nature is discussed in further detail in the chapters on specific schools, or in the separate regulation for interdisciplinary study. University schools and faculties shall work closely with the central administration and must promote close cooperation amongst themselves in order to make optimal use of human and financial resources, facilities, appliances and equipment in the interests of diverse education and research.

Departments may be established within faculties, subject to the approval of the governing board of the school, and these shall be enumerated in the relevant Articles on faculties in this Regulation. Administration and support services shall operate within schools as further determined by the dean of school.

The governing board of a school shall comprise the dean of school and heads of faculty. One student representative shall also sit on the board, appointed by student organisations within the school for a one-year term. [The University Council may choose to also appoint to the governing board of a school representatives of certain subjects that make up a faculty. Furthermore, the University Council may choose to appoint to the governing board of a school a representative of a public institution with close working ties to the teaching and training of students within the school.]1

The governing board of a school shall address school-wide matters, including faculty decisions regarding programmes on offer, faculty proposals for new programmes and enrolment restrictions for each academic year, where applicable. The governing board of a school shall make proposals to the University Council regarding amendments to existing regulation or new regulation concerning the organisation and operations of the school, its faculties and institutes; conferral of honorary doctorates; and offering research scientists unadvertised academic positions. The governing board of a school shall take decisions regarding the establishment of University institutes and research centres, [cf. paragraph 6 of this Article, and resolutions concerning contract research and teaching, cf. paragraph 7 of this Article.]2

Schools and faculties may operate special University institutes and research centres, established in accordance with the decisions of the governing board of the school, cf. further provisions in Article 27 of this Regulation.

Departments and institutes within schools and faculties may, with the consent of the dean of school, conduct contract research as well as continuing education and life-long learning for the general public. The governing board of each school must pass specific resolutions concerning such contract research and continuing education, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Article 64 of this Regulation.

The University Council may choose to order a special assessment of the operations of schools, faculties, institutes or other organisational units within the University, cf. e.g. the provisions of Article 24 of this Regulation.

1Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1143/2011.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.

Article 13.  Role of the dean of school

The dean of a school shall be appointed by the rector for a five-year term, in accordance with University Council rules of procedure, and shall work under the rector’s mandate. The dean of a school is answerable to the rector and University Council, and the rector is the the dean’s immediate superior. The dean of a school governs day-to-day operations and acts as its academic leader and spokesperson within and outside of the University. The dean of a school is responsible for the implementation of University of Iceland policy at the school level; unity and academic collaboration; relations with Icelandic and international partners; quality of teaching, research and services; administration and support services within the school; the finances and running of the school and institutes under its auspices; and human resources within the school.

The dean of a school shall rule on any disputes that may arise within the school and its institutes, address disciplinary matters concerning students within the school and other matters involving student violations of University rules, and shall determine disciplinary sanctions, cf. Article 51 of this Regulation.

The dean of a school shall regularly inform the rector of school performance in matters of teaching, research, administration and collaboration with Icelandic and international partners, as well as of the school’s contribution to Icelandic society.

The dean of a school shall attend deans’ meetings, together with the rector and deans of other schools. The dean of a school is responsible for the school’s report in the University yearbook, in consultation with the rector. The dean of a school may appoint working committees to advise and assist in formulating policy and to perform specific tasks in accordance with a formal statement of duties.

Furthermore, the dean of a school may, under the authority of the rector, offer a specially qualified individual a position as a visiting scholar at a faculty. The arrangements for such positions of visiting scholar shall be subject to rules of procedure formulated by the University Council Quality Committee and approved by the University Council.

The required qualifications, responsibilities and tasks of the dean of a school shall be outlined in greater detail in a formal statement of duties provided by the rector.

Article 14.  Meetings of the school governing board

Meetings of the school governing board are held as needed. The dean of school shall call meetings. Should a third of all governing board members request that a meeting be held, the dean is obliged to call one. Board meetings shall be announced in writing or by email with at least three days' notice, if possible. The meeting agenda shall accompany notice of the meeting.

The dean of school shall chair board meetings. The dean of school shall see to the publication of minutes and announcement of decisions from board meetings, where there is occasion to do so. The dean of a school may appoint one head of faculty to preside over school board meetings in the absence of the dean. In the absence of a head of faculty, the deputy head of faculty shall attend the meeting.

The majority of members with the right to vote must attend a meeting of the school governing board to constitute a quorum. Should a permanent board member be unable to attend a meeting, the relevant alternate shall be invited to the meeting. The power of vote is decisive. In the case of a tie vote, the dean of school, or whoever chairs the meeting, shall cast the deciding vote.

Minutes shall be kept of meetings, in which decisions taken by the school governing board shall be recorded. The managing director of the school shall attend board meetings and take the minutes; the managing director shall not have the right to vote. The dean of school shall appoint a secretary in the absence of the managing director.

Article 15.  Role, operations and administration of faculties

University faculties are the basic academic units of the University, operating under the auspices of schools. Teaching, research and administration are conducted within faculties. Faculties are independent in internal matters, subject to those limitations outlined in the University central regulation. They are responsible for teaching, studies and the conferral of degrees upon the completion of study.

Each faculty shall handle matters concerning subjects within the faculty, determine course material and modes of teaching and examination, determine the division of teaching duties between faculty teaching staff and make proposals to the dean of school regarding the hiring of sessional teachers, necessary allocation of funds and new positions. Governance of faculties is in the hands of the faculty meeting, the faculty council where applicable, and the head of faculty. The faculty meeting shall hold decision-making power in all faculty business. At a faculty meeting, the faculty may delegate decision-making power in specific matters or areas to the faculty council or faculty head.

Faculties may, with the approval of the school governing board, be divided into departments. There shall, as a rule, be several study programmes within a department, forming an academic whole, cf. Article 21 of this Regulation.

Article 16.  Role of the faculty head

The school dean shall select a faculty head for a two-year term, in accordance with a nomination determined at a faculty meeting, cf. Article 19.

The faculty head is answerable to the school dean, and the dean is the faculty head’s immediate superior. The head of a faculty is the academic leader of the faculty and is responsible, in consultation with the dean of the school, for formulation of faculty policy, organisation of study, quality of teaching and research, relations with collaborating partners and ensuring that the faculty and its units operate in conformity with the school budget.

The head of a faculty shall regularly inform the school dean of faculty performance in matters of teaching, research, administration and collaboration with Icelandic and international partners, as well as of the faculty’s contribution to Icelandic society.

The head of a faculty shall sit on the school governing board, along with other faculty heads, student representatives and the school dean. The head of a faculty is the faculty’s ultimate representative in relation to individuals and institutions within and outside of the University. Between faculty meetings or faculty council meetings, the faculty head shall hold, on their behalf, decision-making power in all faculty affairs. The faculty head may appoint working committees to advise and assist in formulating policy and to perform specific tasks in accordance with a formal statement of duties. The head of a faculty shall oversee the content on the faculty in the school’s report for the University yearbook, in consultation with the school dean.

The role, responsibilities and tasks of a faculty head shall be outlined in greater detail in a formal statement of duties provided by the school dean, in consultation with the rector.

Article 17.  Composition of the faculty meeting

Professors, senior lecturers, lecturers and adjunct lecturers shall attend faculty meetings, as well as the directors of research institutes within the faculty. The meeting shall furthermore be attended by three representatives of the faculty’s students where the number of others members with the right to attend meetings and vote is twelve or fewer, with one additional student representative for each additional six. Selection of student representatives shall take place as per rules set by the faculty meeting. These rules shall ensure, where possible, that faculty meetings are attended by both undergraduate and postgraduate students. A faculty may grant decision-making power regarding the manner of selecting student representatives to student associations within the faculty.

Everyone entitled to attend faculty meetings is obliged to do so.

A faculty meeting may decide that research scientists, research scholars and research specialists appointed to the faculty or an institute under its authority shall attend faculty meetings; the faculty may also determine whether they shall have the right to vote. A faculty may likewise decide that guest lecturers, holders of academic titles, representatives of University research centres with ties to the faculty, or sessional teachers with extensive teaching duties shall attend faculty meetings; the faculty may also determine whether they shall have the right to vote.

The school dean shall determine teaching or administrative tasks assigned to members of teaching staff, cf. Article 32, and which faculty and department they shall be a member of. Such a decision shall be taken for a period of at least one academic year.

Professors, senior lecturers, lecturers and adjunct lecturers holding full-time positions in a faculty, and academic directors of research institutes under its auspices shall be entitled to vote, as shall any persons the faculty determines shall have this right in accordance with the provisions for authorisation outlined in paragraph 3. Student representatives at faculty meetings shall be entitled to vote unless otherwise stipulated in this Regulation or other University rules. 75% employment or higher shall be considered a full-time position. 37-74% employment shall confer half a vote. Lower than 37% employment shall not confer voting rights. A faculty may depart from this rule and determine that persons who have the right to attend faculty meetings shall have full voting rights regardless of their employment ratio. Only those persons attending faculty meetings are entitled to vote.

Should a full-time staff member, hired or appointed, be on leave and another person hired as replacement on a fixed-term contract, that person shall exercise the voting rights of the staff member on leave. The same shall apply if a staff member is on parental leave.

The school dean may take part in the processing of business in all faculties within the school in question, but does not have voting rights. The rector may likewise take part in the processing of business in all University faculties, but does not have voting rights.

A member of teaching staff who has been relieved of teaching or administrative obligations, cf. the provisions of Article 33 of this Regulation, is exempt from the obligation of attending faculty meetings. The individual in question shall not have voting rights at faculty meetings while relieved of such obligations. The member of teaching staff may request not to be exempted from the obligation of attending faculty meetings and shall in such case retain the right to vote.

Article 18.  Faculty meetings

Each University faculty shall hold faculty meetings as necessary; a meeting must be called if the rector, school dean or a third of faculty members with the right to attend the meeting so request.

The faculty head shall call a meeting in writing or via email with three days’ notice, if possible; individual faculties may, however, determine a different procedure for calling meetings. The meeting agenda shall be specified in the notice of the meeting. A faculty member must immediately notify the faculty head of inability to attend.

The faculty meeting shall have a quorum if the majority of those holding voting rights attend. The power of vote is decisive. In the case of a tie vote, the faculty head, or whoever chairs the meeting, shall cast the deciding vote.

Minutes shall be kept of faculty meetings and shall be attested to, if possible, before the meeting is adjourned, and no later than at the following meeting. Minutes of meetings shall be sent to all persons entitled to attend faculty meetings.

Article 19.  Election of faculty head

Each faculty shall elect a faculty head and a deputy faculty head from among the full-time professors and senior lecturers of the faculty. [Should a faculty meeting have made use of its authorisation under paragraph 3 of Article 17 of this Regulation to determine that research scientists, research scholars and research specialists appointed to the faculty or an institute under its authority are to attend faculty meetings with voting rights, the faculty […]2 may, with the approval of the school dean, nominate a faculty head and deputy faculty head from among the full-time research scholars and research scientists within the faculty, provided that they have considerable administrative experience and have performed what amounts to 20% teaching duties every year for the past three years.]1 In a faculty divided into departments, the faculty head and deputy faculty head shall not be from the same department. In a faculty where four-fifths of the professors, senior lecturers and lecturers are from a single department, deviation from this provision is permitted. The faculty head and deputy faculty head shall be elected for a two-year term. Election shall be by written ballot, and voting shall be completed by 1 February each year that the term of office of an incumbent faculty head expires; the term of office shall commence 1 July and conclude 30 June two years later. [The faculty may decide on appointments via electronic voting, email or other equally secure methods, provided that the results of the vote are formally presented and recorded in the minutes of the next faculty meeting. Electronic voting must be open for at least three working days and the required majority shall be determined by the number of those holding voting rights at the faculty meeting.]2

Eligible members of teaching staff are obliged to accept election to serve as faculty head or deputy faculty head. A faculty head may be re-elected, but the individual in question has the right to decline re-election. Anyone who has served as rector may also decline to accept election as faculty head the following term after stepping down as rector. Should the faculty head pass away or retire, a new faculty head and deputy faculty head shall be elected for the remainder of the term in progress. Should both the faculty head and deputy faculty head be absent, the school dean shall decide which of the faculty’s professors or senior lecturers shall be summoned to temporarily perform their duties.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 970/2009.  
2Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1077/2013.

Article 20.  Faculty council

An administrative committee, the faculty council, may be established. The following members shall sit on the faculty council, in addition to the faculty head: the deputy faculty head; one representative from each department, where such exist; and two student representatives, elected by student organisations for a one-year term from among the student representatives attending faculty meetings. Faculties shall establish more detailed rules on the number of representatives at faculty council meetings. Should the number of other representatives in the faculty council exceed twelve, the same rules shall apply to the number of student representatives as apply to faculty meetings. The rules that apply to faculty meetings shall also apply to voting rights and weighting of votes at faculty council meetings.

A newly elected faculty council shall take over responsibility 1 July of each year.

The faculty council shall hold meetings at least once each month while classes are in session; at other times, meetings shall be held as necessary. A faculty council meeting must be called if one-third of faculty members with voting rights so demand. Meetings shall be announced in writing or via email, with at least three days’ notice, if possible. The meeting agenda shall be specified in the notice of the meeting. The faculty head shall call and chair meetings; if the faculty head is absent, the deputy faculty head shall perform these duties. The faculty council shall have a quorum if the majority of members holding voting rights attend. The power of vote is decisive. In the case of a tie vote, the faculty head, or whoever chairs the meeting, shall cast the deciding vote. Minutes shall be kept of faculty council meetings and shall be attested to, if possible, before the meeting is adjourned, and no later than at the following meeting. Minutes of meetings shall be sent to all persons entitled to attend faculty meetings.

The faculty council may address all faculty matters, but shall only have the power to make final decisions on issues where the faculty meeting has delegated such power to it. Such delegation shall be recorded in the minutes of the faculty meeting. The matter may, however, always be referred to the faculty meeting if the faculty head or one-third of faculty council members with voting rights so request, in which case the final decision in the matter shall be taken at a faculty meeting.

The faculty head shall see to the implementation of decisions taken by the faculty council and at faculty meetings.

Article 21.  Departments

Departments may, with the approval of the school governing board, be organised within faculties. There shall, as a rule, be several study programmes within a department, cf. Article 53, forming an academic unit and conferring a degree. The head of department shall manage the department. The role, responsibilities and duties of the head of department shall be outlined in greater detail in a formal statement of duties provided by the school dean. Should a dispute arise regarding departmental boundaries, the school dean shall determine the division. The division of faculties into departments shall be outlined in greater detail in the relevant chapters of this Regulation.

Each department, under the authority of the faculty meeting, shall handle matters concerning subjects within the department, determine course material and modes of study and examination, determine the division of teaching duties between departmental teaching staff and make proposals to the head of faculty regarding the hiring of sessional teachers, necessary allocation of funds and new positions.

The head of department shall oversee departmental operations and supervise the work of study committees, teaching methods and other matters concerning teaching.

Personnel of subjects within the department are entitled to attend departmental meetings, as are student representatives. Rules applying to the selection of student representatives at the faculty meeting shall likewise apply to the selection of student representatives at departmental meetings, cf. Article 17. The rules that apply to faculty meetings shall also apply to voting rights and weighting of votes at departmental meetings. No individual may attend and have voting rights at departmental meetings in two departments. The school dean shall determine which department a member of teaching staff belongs to. Faculty heads may participate in the handling of business in all departments within the relevant faculty, but shall only have voting rights in their own departments.

Each department shall elect a head and a deputy head from among its full-time permanent teaching staff. They shall be elected for a two-year term. Election shall be by written ballot, and voting shall be completed by 1 February each year that the term of office of an incumbent head of department expires; the term of office shall commence 1 July and conclude 30 June two years later. The deputy head shall be elected in the same manner as the head. Should there be a need for a second deputy head, eligible members of the department shall be appointed, in order of their length of employment.

Departmental meetings shall be held as necessary. A meeting must be called if the faculty head or one-third of department members with voting rights so request. The head of department shall call a departmental meeting in writing or via email with three days’ notice, if possible; individual departments may, however, determine a different procedure for calling meetings. The meeting agenda shall be specified in the notice of the meeting. The meeting shall have a quorum if the majority of department members holding voting rights attend. The power of vote is decisive. In the case of a tie vote, the head of department, or whoever chairs the meeting, shall cast the deciding vote. Minutes shall be kept of departmental meetings and shall be attested to, if possible, before the meeting is adjourned, and no later than at the following meeting. Should a dispute arise at a departmental meeting, the head of department or head of subject may refer the dispute to the faculty for resolution. Minutes of meetings shall be sent to all persons entitled to attend departmental meetings and faculty council meetings.

Article 22.  School assembly

The school assembly is a consultative forum for discussion on the internal business of the school. The school dean chairs the school assembly under the authority of the rector. The University Council may seek the opinion of a school assembly on any subject concerning the operations of the school, its faculties and institutes.

The school assembly shall elect representatives of the school to the University Council, cf. Article 10 of this Regulation. [A school may choose to elect representatives to the University Council by electronic ballot.]1

The school assembly is competent to pass resolutions on matters they consider relevant to the interests of the school. The University Council, rector, directors of University institutes and any other interested parties shall be informed of resolutions of the school assembly.

Decisions of school deans, the school governing board, faculty heads or directors of University institutes may not be referred to the school assembly.

Committees and working groups may be appointed to work on issues at assembly meetings and between meetings. The school assembly shall set its own rules of order.

The school dean, faculty heads, deputy faculty heads, heads of department, directors of institutes under the authority of the school or its faculties, and the managing director of the school shall be ex officio members of the school assembly. Academic staff within faculties and school institutes shall also be members of the school assembly, elected for two-year terms by the faculties and institutes in question, in accordance with more detailed rules set by the governing board of the school. Two members of the administrative and support services staff within a school shall also be members of the school assembly, elected for a two-year term by their peers by written ballot. In addition, there shall be one student representative on the school assembly for every five representatives of other parties within the school; they shall be elected by a special poll for a one-year term.

The governing board of a school shall establish more detailed rules on the number of representatives within the school assembly and their selection. These rules shall include provisions on election to and seats in the school assembly for representatives of other institutes and organisations beyond those listed in paragraph 7, as well as on their right to vote. These rules may stipulate that all permanent members of staff at a school have the right to attend the school assembly and take part in its activities. Rules applying to the number and selection of student representatives at faculty meetings shall also apply to school assembly meetings, cf. Article 17.

Election or appointment shall be completed by 1 March each year that the period of appointment for a sitting school assembly expires; the period of appointment shall commence 1 July and conclude 30 June two years later.

The school dean shall call school assembly meetings, and shall chair these meetings or delegate this duty to others. The school assembly shall meet at least once per semester. Should a two-thirds majority of school assembly representatives request a meeting, the dean is required to call a meeting.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 152/2010.

Article 23.  Course catalogue and teaching committees

A course catalogue for the University as a whole shall be published each year. The Division of Academic Affairs shall oversee publication; school and faculty staff shall manage the editing and updating of material for relevant sections of the course catalogue. The Division of Academic Affairs shall appoint the editor, and each school shall appoint a representative to the course catalogue editorial board. The course catalogue shall be jointly produced by the editor, the editorial board and faculty contacts.

The course catalogue shall describe, among other things, organisation of study in each school and faculty, school and faculty administration, study programmes, admission requirements, programme requirements and learning outcomes, student progression, maximum length of study, degrees conferred, courses offered and their weighting, semesters, teaching methods and organisation of classes, course material, assessment, examination requirements, vocational training, practical exercises and all other aspects of study, as applicable.

General information on admission requirements, enrolment restrictions, the application process, registration, payment of fees, examinations, credits and grades, student services and student rights and obligations shall also be published in the course catalogue. Further stipulations on the content of the course catalogue and procedures for its preparation shall be made in special rules established by the University Council. As a rule, the course catalogue for the coming academic year should be published on the University website in March each year. All changes to the course catalogue must be reported in writing no later than the beginning of the semester.

An advisory teaching committee shall operate within each school, made up of the heads of the study committees of individual faculties within the school (one from each faculty), along with one student representative. The school dean shall appoint the chair of the teaching committee, who shall also be the school representative on the Academic Affairs Committee of the University Council. The teaching committee of a school shall oversee the formulation of school teaching policy and follow up on this policy under the authority of the school dean. The committee shall organise a forum on faculty academic matters between students and teaching staff and handle other tasks with a view to improving teaching and studies. The committee shall organise, in consultation with the Centre for Teaching and Learning of the Division of Academic Affairs, counselling and courses on teaching and assessment for new teaching staff, teaching assistants, sessional teachers and tenured teaching staff; organise counselling for students in collaboration with the Student Counselling and Career Centre of the Division of Academic Affairs; and oversee the teaching evaluation survey and, in consultation with the school governing board and the school dean, its follow-up.

A school teaching committee is, in collaboration with University and school administration, responsible for ensuring that information is available on study, instruction and facilities within a faculty, as per quality criteria and University policy. A school teaching committee is, together with school administration, responsible for the gathering and dissemination of information on teaching and studies within faculties, and the updating and storage of staff teaching portfolios. It shall oversee business relating to regular internal and external reviews of teaching quality at faculties within the school, in accordance with current regulations.

Advisory study committees may operate within each faculty, made up of students and teaching staff in equal numbers. Teaching staff (including sessional teachers) and students shall elect their representatives separately at the beginning of each academic year. The chair of the study committee shall be a tenured member of teaching staff. The role of these study committees is to discuss propositions regarding course material for each subject, and to compose statements and propositions concerning organisation of study and the teaching structure of the subject. Faculties shall further determine the number of study committees and their role.

Article 24.  Review and assurance of quality of teaching and research

Internal review of the quality of teaching and research shall take place within the University; external evaluation shall take place under the auspices of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, in accordance with relevant regulation and legislation. The University Council or rector may, however, organise an external review of the operations of individual schools, faculties or other organisational units if the Council deems there to be reason for doing so.

The University Council shall, upon receiving the recommendations of the Council’s Quality Committee, establish a formal quality assurance system for the University, which shall provide for policy, implementation, responsibility, supervision and follow-up for internal reviews.

The University shall publicly release information on internal reviews and their findings, and it shall do so in a standardised manner.

Article 25.  University institutes

University institutes are variously under the auspices of the University Council or a school or faculty, or are governed by separate legislation. An institute may operate under the auspices of more than one school or more than one faculty. The University Council shall make decisions on new institutes, the disbanding of existing institutes and other changes made to them. The governing board of a school shall determine whether an institute is under the auspices of the school or a faculty.

Article 26.  Institutes under the auspices of the University Council

The University may operate institutes within its purview that are under the auspices of the University Council. All things being equal, institutes under the auspices of the University Council should generally be service institutes. The University Council shall set specific rules on their roles, facilities, organisation, governance, personnel, finances and any other things that may prove necessary. A formal evaluation of their operations and activities shall take place at regular intervals, as further determined by the University Council.

Article 27.  Institutes under the auspices of schools or faculties

Research institutes and centres may operate under the auspices of schools or faculties. An institute may operate under the auspices of more than one school or more than one faculty. Regulation shall stipulate which school or faculty is to house an institute, and a special contract shall be drawn up regarding financial responsibility.

Each institute shall be subject to special regulation approved by the University Council. These regulations shall describe in detail the operations and organisation of institutes, in conformity with circumstances within each school and the differing needs of schools.

A formal evaluation of their operations and activities shall take place at regular intervals, as further determined by the University Council.

An institute shall, if applicable, propose resolutions on contract research services, to be confirmed by the University Council.

The role and organisation of research institutes under the auspices of schools and faculties shall be as follows:

1. Role
To [secure the infrastructure]1 for research and development work in the academic field in question, strengthen the connection between research and teaching and attend to research services. To provide postgraduate students with facilities and equipment for research work, to the extent practicable, and provide them with training and experience in academic working practices. To carry out research service projects, provide advice in the field in question and encourage close ties between the University, Icelandic industry and Icelandic society. To carry out publishing activities. More detailed provision may be made for the role of each institute in its regulation.

2. Facilities
The University of Iceland shall provide school and faculty institutes with working facilities, such as premises and equipment, to the extent possible.

3. Organisation of centres
A school may choose to divide a research institute into academically separate research centres, or it may delegate this responsibility to the board of the institute. The board of the research institute shall set guidelines for centres, which may be further divided into units. The board and/or director of a centre shall be elected [...]1 in accordance with the regulation of each institute. Institutes that become research centres under an altered structure may retain their former names.

4. Personnel
[Professors, senior lecturers, lecturers and adjunct lecturers of the relevant school or faculty may have work facilities at individual institutes if they so request and if circumstances permit.]1 Other personnel are: research scientists, scholars and specialists; students and assistants; and other staff hired by the institute.

5. Board
The composition of and election to the board shall be as provided for in the regulation of each institute. Should a director not be hired, the chair of the board shall represent the institute.

The board shall address all matters affecting the institute as a whole, be answerable to the school dean for its finances, draw up its budget and submit proposals to the school dean concerning financial allocations and their distribution, together with the distribution of other resources. The board shall resolve any uncertainties that may arise concerning the internal operations of the institute.

The chair of the board shall call a board meeting in writing or via email with three days’ notice, if possible; individual institutes may, however, determine a different procedure for calling meetings. The meeting agenda shall be specified in the notice of the meeting. A board meeting must be called at the request of two or more board members, or if the rector or dean of school (or, as the case may be, the head of faculty) request it, in which case they shall have the right to speak and make proposals at the meeting. Should there be a tie vote at a board meeting, the chair, or whoever is acting as chair, shall cast the deciding vote.

Minutes shall be kept of board meetings and shall be attested to, if possible, before the meeting is adjourned, and no later than at the following meeting. A copy of the minutes of the meeting shall be sent to the dean of school or head of faculty, as appropriate.

6. Hiring of staff
The provisions of Articles 8 and 17 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions and Chapter III of this Regulation shall apply to the hiring of institute staff.

An institute’s regulation shall include provisions on its day-to-day management. Should a director be hired, the director shall manage the day-to-day operations of the institute. The director shall carry out tasks assigned by the board. The dean of school shall, after having consulted the rector, issue directors with a formal statement of duties outlining their responsibilities in greater detail. A director shall, as a rule, hold a Master’s degree or other equivalent university degree. Directors shall attend board meetings and have the right to speak and make proposals.

7. Income, accounting and services
The income of institutes under the auspices of schools or faculties may consist of the following:

7.1       Allocations from the state treasury.
7.2       Allocations from the University Council or the relevant school or faculty.
7.3       Grants for individual projects.
7.4       Income from service operations.
7.5       Income from publishing activities.
7.6       Other income that the institute may have acquired.

The accounts of the institute shall be part of accounting for the University of Iceland. Its budget and financial statement must be approved by the dean of school and submitted and presented to the school governing board and at a faculty meeting, where applicable. The provisions of Article 73 shall apply concerning overhead charges regarding non-governmantal income.

Should the institute offer services in a competitive market, such operations shall be kept separate and shall fall under a special service division within the institute. This division shall be financially separate, and care taken to ensure that its operations are not subsidised with other income, in accordance with the provisions of the Competition Act.

8. Annual meeting
The board shall hold an annual meeting with institute personnel, in which the annual report is submitted. The annual meeting shall furthermore be a forum for discussion of the operations and activities of the institute, academic and technological innovation, as well as research policy. At the annual meeting, which as a rule shall be held in the autumn, the budget for the coming year shall be presented.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 970/2009.

CHAPTER III
UNIVERSITY TEACHING AND RESEARCH STAFF
Article 28.  Academic staff

The academic staff of the University are professors, senior lecturers (dósentar) and lecturers (lektorar). The University or its institutes may engage staff for scientific or research work without teaching duties. These staff members shall be given the title of research scientist (vísindamaður), research scholar (fræðimaður) or research specialist (sérfræðingur).

Where reference is made to academic staff in this Chapter, the term shall also include research specialists, research scholars and research scientists, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

Article 29.  Decision on appointments

[The rector shall engage personnel to fill permanent academic positions at the University of Iceland, and promote members of academic staff, cf. Article 31 of this Regulation. The dean of a school shall, under the authority of the rector, engage temporary academic staff, adjunct lecturers (aðjúnktar) and sessional teachers (stundakennarar) at the school and institutes under its auspices. The relevant director shall, under the authority of the rector, engage academic staff at institutes under the auspices of the University Council. The dean of a school and director of an institute are not permitted to delegate this power of decision to others. [...]3]1

[No one may be engaged for a position as professor, senior lecturer, lecturer, research scientist, research scholar or research specialist without meeting minimum requirements for the position, as judged by the majority of an evaluation committee. These minimum requirements are defined in Article 41 of this Regulation. Should an applicant have been judged by an evaluation committee within the last five years as meeting minimum requirements for a comparable position, the rector may refer the application directly to the selection committee, cf. paragraph 3.]2

Prior to a decision on appointment, applications shall be discussed by a selection committee in accordance with the provisions of Articles 44-46 of this Regulation. The verdict of a selection committee need not be sought when hiring a person for a position exempted from the advertising requirement under Article 36. The rector and school deans are always permitted to seek such a verdict.

[Sessional teachers at the University of Iceland perform teaching and assessment in accordance with University regulation and the applicable rules of each faculty. Sessional teaching shall not be an individual's main employment and the position of sessional teacher shall not exceed 49%. A contract of appointment as sessional teacher, specifying employment conditions as well as teaching and assessment, shall be made at the beginning of a semester and for one semester at a time. Specific rules of procedure shall be established on the general competence and hiring process of sessional teachers at the University of Iceland, to be observed by the dean of school when hiring.]3

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 1143/2011.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 262/2010.
3Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 368/2016.

Article 30.  Part-time positions

Professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, research scientists, research scholars and research specialists may be engaged in part-time positions (i.e., 20-74% positions) at University schools, faculties or institutes.

The Rector may contractually link a teaching position to a specific position outside the University or to a position at one of its institutes. This shall apply irrespective of the individual’s professional title.

The advertising of part-time positions shall be as per Articles 35 and 36 of this Regulation.

The salaries of staff in part-time positions shall be as per the union contract between the relevant union and the Minister of Finance. Arrangements for salaries paid for teaching positions linked to specific enterprises or institutes are to be negotiated between the enterprise or institute in question and the rector or dean of school.

A contract in accordance with paragraph 2 shall stipulate the duties and rights of the staff member as far as the University is concerned, location of work facilities, and the termination of the position, including arrangements for the position at the University if the staff member ceases to work for the enterprise or institute in question before the term of the agreement is complete.

The same rules shall apply to appointments to part-time positions as to full-time positions, unless otherwise stipulated by legislation or this Regulation.

Article 31.  Appointments

Professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, research scientists, research scholars and research specialists shall, as a rule, be initially engaged by the University on a temporary basis for a period of five years, irrespective of whether the position is full-time or part-time. In exceptional circumstances, the length of the contract may be extended for up to two years beyond this five-year period.

The rector may, however, decide that the initial appointment for a teaching or research position should be for a period of fewer than five years or permanent, on the condition that the school or faculty have grounds for deviating from the general rule in paragraph 1.

[A staff member shall not automatically receive the right to a permanent contract at the conclusion of the temporary contract. The rector shall determine whether the engagement of a member of academic staff is to be made permanent, upon receiving the recommendation of the University of Iceland Promotion Committee, in accordance with the provisions of the Regulation on promotion and permanent appointment of academic staff at the University of Iceland.]1 [...]2

[...]1

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 262/2010.
2Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 1143/2011.

Article 32.  Duties

The duties of teaching staff at the University are divided into three main areas: research, teaching and administration. The duties of a staff member engaged solely for scientific and research work shall be divided between research and administration. The University Council shall establish further rules concering the duties of teaching and research staff at the University of Iceland. These rules may stipulate that a staff member engaged for scientific or research work shall perform certain teaching tasks as well. The dean of a school, in consultation with faculty heads, shall determine the allocation of duties between individual members of teaching staff, or persons appointed exclusively for scientific and research tasks, within the limits set by the general rules. The dean shall furthermore determine which teaching and administrative tasks a member of teaching staff shall be assigned.

Article 33.  Sabbaticals

The rector may, upon receiving a dean of school’s recommendation, grant a member of teaching staff an exemption from teaching and administrative duties for one to two semesters at a time to enable this staff member to devote these work hours to research, in accordance with rules established by the University Council on the duties of teaching and research staff at the University of Iceland. Teaching and administrative duties during a member of teaching staff's work hours, including the period of exemption from teaching and administrative duties, must not, however, comprise less than 50% of total working hours. The aforementioned exemption shall only be granted if the member of teaching staff has submitted all requisite reports on teaching and research and has accumulated a set minimum of points in accordance with the provisions of rules established by the University Council, cf. sentence 1.

Under the authority of the Rector, a school dean may grant teaching staff leave from their duties during the teaching session for up to three weeks to enable them to travel abroad to take part in conferences or attend to other tasks, provided it can be shown that granting of said permission will not be detrimental to their teaching. If a longer period of leave is desired, the dean shall make a decision in the matter and forward it to the rector, together with a statement on the reasons for which permission has been granted.

Article 34.  Definition of positions

[The relevant faculty or institute shall make a recommendation to the dean of school regarding the definition of a given position, in accordance with faculty, school and University policy. This task shall be assigned to the faculty council or a faculty selection committee under the authority of the council, the board of the institute in question or the board of study of an interdisciplinary programme. The definition of a position shall be based on a single, specific professional title, cf. Article 28, and shall be made available before the position is advertised. The advertisement shall clearly state the requirements that an applicant must meet, for example with respect to academic field and degree qualifications. The advertisement shall also indicate the relevant field of expertise. Applicants shall be required to hold a doctoral degree in the field concerned from an accredited university, unless the faculty or institute considers this unfeasible. In case a doctoral degree is not required the applicants shall possess knowledge and experience in accordance with international criteria for the respective title and their field of expertise, as verified by an evaluation committee's verdict. They shall furthermore have demonstrated by their performance that they are recognised in their field. If a school or institute decides not to require a doctoral degree in an advertisement for a position, an explanation of why the requirement is not made shall be enclosed with the advertisement when sent to the Division of Human Resources.]1

A staff member shall be appointed to a specific school, faculty within a school, or institute. The rector and dean of school may alter the definition of the position according to their administrative authority.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 546/2015.

Article 35.  Advertisement

Vacancies for university teaching staff and persons appointed for scientific or research tasks shall be advertised on the public appointments website of the Ministry of Finance (starfatorg.is).

In general, a position must be advertised with an application deadline of at least four weeks from publication of the advertisement.

To ensure that the University is able to select from the most qualified candidates possible, vacancies shall be advertised in international forums and in Icelandic newspapers, as applicable. The Division of Human Resources shall oversee all advertisements, both in Icelandic and international forums.

All information about vacant positions at the University must be accessible on the University website.

Article 36.  Exemptions from the advertising requirement

A position need not be advertised if it concerns a temporary replacement for a twelve-month period or shorter or a part-time position that would not be considered principal employment, as defined by the Rights and Obligations of Public Employees Act. If a person is appointed as a replacement for a twelve-month period or shorter, the position may not be extended without advertisement in accordance with this Regulation.

A position shall not be advertised where a promotion or transfer to another professional title is concerned, in accordance with the provisions of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions or this Regulation, cf. Articles 38-39.

A position shall not be advertised when the rector invites a member of academic staff to accept a teaching position at the University, in accordance with the recommendation of a school and with the approval of the University Council, in conformity with paragraph 2 of Article 17 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008.

Positions may be exempt from the advertising requirement if they are linked to special temporary grants or projects; if they are undertaken by students at the University alongside research-based postgraduate study; or if they are linked to a specific position outside the University on the basis of a cooperative agreement, cf. paragraph 2 of Article 30 of this Regulation.

A decision regarding appointment to a position at the University of Iceland on the basis of an exemption from the advertising requirement, cf. paragraph 4, may not be taken unless all following conditions apply:

  1. The position is within a faculty or institute that has defined said position with regard to general rules on qualification requirements and duties.
  2. The position is temporary and for a maximum period of five years, or two years in the case of extension of a temporary contract, cf. Article 31.
  3. The financial basis for the position is secured, as are the necessary work facilities.
  4. It is apparent that the school, faculty or institute has reasonable grounds for exempting the position from advertisement, cf. paragraph 4.
  5. A qualifications assessment from an Evaluation Committee is available, in the case of positions of professor, senior lecturer, lecturer, research scientist, research scholar or research specialist.
Article 37.  Applications and their processing

Job applications should be sent to the University of Iceland [Division of Science and Innovation.]1 Applications and accompanying documentation should preferably be submitted in electronic form. Applications and accompanying documentation that are not submitted in electronic form must be sent in duplicate. Once the deadline for application has expired, the [Division of Science and Innovation]1 shall confirm receipt of the application.

Applicants must include with their applications certification attesting to their education and work experience, a list of publications, a report on their academic work and other work they have carried out and a report on their plans if they are offered the position.

In their applications, applicants must make clear which of their publications, numbering no more than eight, they regard as most relevant to the position in question. Applicants shall submit only these publications with their application. When submitting publications with more than one author, applicants must account for their own contribution to the work. Applicants are also expected to include references for their teaching and administrative work, as appropriate.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 74/2013.

Article 38.  [Promotion of teaching and research staff

[The rector may, without advertising the position, promote a lecturer to the position of senior lecturer or professor; a senior lecturer to the position of professor; a research specialist to the position of research scholar or scientist; or a research scholar to the position of research scientist, on the condition that a reference from an [evaluation committee]2 for the relevant school is available, stating that the individual meets minimum requirements for the position and that the University of Iceland Promotion Committee has recommended that the individual be promoted. The provisions of the Regulation on promotion and permanent appointment of academic staff at the University of Iceland, established by the University Council, shall apply to promotion.]1

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 262/2010.
2Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 546/2015.

Article 39.  Transfer of research specialists, research scholars and research scientists to teaching positions

The rector may, upon an agreement being entered into between the relevant faculty and institute and in consultation with the dean of school, transfer research specialists, research scholars and research scientists to the position of lecturer, senior lecturer or professor, in which case they shall assume teaching and administrative duties at the relevant faculty.

If a research specialist is transferred to the position of lecturer, a research scholar to the position of senior lecturer or a research scientist to the position of professor without a verdict from an evaluation committee concerning the teaching work of the staff member in question, the Academic Affairs Committee shall provide the rector with a report on the teaching competence of the staff member concerned.

Article 40.  Appointment and procedure of evaluation committees

[The rector shall appoint five standing evaluation committees to assess whether applicants for vacant positions are qualified for the position in question. One evaluation committee shall be appointed for each of the University’s schools to discuss all appointments in the relevant field, in which a qualification assessment is required, [including promotion, cf. Article 31.]2 Standing evaluation committees shall be appointed for a three-year term.]1

Despite the provisions of paragraph 1, the rector may consent to a request for the appointment of a special evaluation committee for the assessment of applicants for a specific teaching or specialist position, should there be special cause to do so.

Evaluation committees shall consist of three persons, appointed on the basis of nomination, and care shall be taken to ensure that committee members include both women and men. To this end, the nominating parties shall be requested to nominate both a woman and a man in every case to serve on the evaluation committee.

In the case of standing evaluation committees, the University Council shall nominate two representatives to each evaluation committee, a woman and a man, a chair and a vice-chair. [For each of the two representatives on each standing evaluation committee two alternates shall be appointed in the same manner.]4 The third representative must be an expert in the field in question, nominated by the relevant faculty or institute, appointed especially to handle each individual appointment.

In the case of special evaluation committees, the University Council shall nominate two members. The faculty or institute at which the position is available shall nominate the third, who shall furthermore serve as chair of the committee.

At least one of the members appointed to the committee must work outside the University of Iceland.

The rector shall notify applicants of those appointed to the evaluation committee.

Only persons who have completed a doctorate or equivalent university degree may be appointed to serve on an evaluation committee, unless this is considered unfeasible. The chair of a standing committee must have been assessed as competent to hold the position of professor. The chair of a specially appointed committee must have been assessed as competent to fill a position equivalent to that being dealt with by the committee. The rector may nonetheless make exemptions from this requirement for the chair of a specially appointed committee, if the person to be appointed is a recognised expert in her or his field, has completed a doctorate and clearly meets the minimum requirements for University teaching staff. A person who has applied for a promotion may not be appointed to an evaluation committee until the matter of the promotion has been resolved.

The provisions of Chapter II of the Administrative Procedure Act no. 37/1993 shall apply concerning the specific eligibility of committee members. Further provisions on the work of evaluation committees shall be included in rules of procedure approved by the University Council, e.g. concerning deadlines for the processing of appointments.

The rector shall appoint secretaries for evaluation committees. The secretary’s role is to assist the evaluation committees and ensure that their work is in compliance with the Administrative Procedure Act, Act on Public Higher Education Institutions, this Regulation and any other legislation or regulation that may apply. The secretary shall specifically make sure that evaluation committees abide by the time limits stipulated in this Regulation and rules of procedure approved by the University Council.

The secretary of an evaluation committee shall prepare discussion of applications and ensure that all appropriate documentation and, as applicable, confirmations and certification are available when the committee first convenes to discuss the appointment. The chair of an evaluation committee shall govern its work and divide tasks among the committee members.

An evaluation committee may collect further data on applicants should it deem this necessary in order to assess their eligibility. Care shall be taken to avoid discrimination against applicants. An evaluation committee may seek written references from experts on specific works or the applicant’s general performance. Should information in any data collected by the evaluation committee be deemed by its members to be disadvantageous to the applicant, the substance of this shall be made known to the applicant, together with its source, and the applicant shall be given the opportunity to respond.

Once an evaluation committee has started assessing applications, it is not obligated to accept further documentation connected to the application, unless to certify documentation that accompanied the application. An evaluation committee shall carry out its work as quickly as possible, and [shall endeavor to]3 submit a draft verdict to the rector – or to the dean of school, if the dean shall make the appointment – within 30 days of receiving all application documentation. If it is foreseeable that an evaluation committee will miss the aforementioned deadline, it shall notify the applicants of this, stating the reasons for the delay and when the committee can be expected to have concluded its work. If this schedule is not adhered to, further notification shall be sent. The evaluation committee shall send the rector, or the dean of school, if applicable, copies of the aforementioned letters. The secretary of the evaluation committee shall ensure that the committee sends the aforementioned notifications.

1Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 262/2010.  
2Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1077/2013
3Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 546/2015.

4Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 41.  Assessment of applicants by the evaluation committee

[Persons appointed as members of academic staff at the University or its institutes shall possess knowledge and experience in accordance with international criteria for the respective title and their field of expertise, as verified by an evaluation committee's verdict, or hold a doctoral degree from an accredited university. They shall furthermore have demonstrated by their performance that they are recognised in their field. Applicants shall be required to hold a doctoral degree in the relevant field from an accredited university, unless the faculty or institute considers this unfeasible, cf. paragraph 1 of Article 34 of this Regulation.]2

The verdict of an evaluation committee shall state the grounds for whether it can be concluded, based on an applicant’s publications and research, academic record and previous employment, that the applicant fulfils the minimum requirements for filling the advertised position in the academic field concerned, cf. paragraph 1 and requirements specified in the advertisement, [apart from requirements for collaboration and communication skills, if such skills are stipulated in the advertisement.]2 An applicant who fulfils these minimum requirements shall be deemed competent to fill the position.

An evaluation committee may take into consideration previous evaluation committee verdicts on the applicant, provided that these are no more than five years old. If reference is made to earlier evaluation committee verdicts, these should be cited in the verdict of the evaluation committee, and the committee shall give grounds for its own position on the statements referred to.

With due regard to educational qualifications, the assessment shall be based on the following aspects of professional work: research, teaching and administration.

The evaluation committee shall base its assessment of the applicant on the assessment rules of the University of Iceland, among other criteria. The evaluation committee shall also take into account the definition of the position that has been advertised, cf. Article 34 of this Regulation [...]1

If an applicant is obviously qualified to fill the advertised position (if, for example, the committee has at hand the verdict of a previous evaluation committee or other assessment that the committee regards as satisfactory), the evaluation committee need not assess the applicant’s qualifications further. Assessment shall otherwise be based on the following considerations:

  1. In assessing research, the main emphasis shall be on its scientific value. Assessment shall cover the originality of a research project, its independence from other research and publications, knowledge of the status of research in the relevant academic field, handling of sources and academic methodology, academic innovation and, as appropriate, the practical value of the research. Teaching materials and other original work can be of scientific value insofar as they fulfil these requirements. Assessment shall be concerned firstly with written works, books and articles that have been published or accepted for publication in recognised journals, in Iceland or abroad, and have been academically reviewed. Secondly, consideration shall be given to completed opinions and progress reports issued by the applicant. Thirdly, work in progress may be considered.
  2. In assessing teaching contribution, the main focus should be on how much care an applicant has devoted to teaching work, for instance in compiling teaching material and instructions, and to the variety and originality of teaching methods. In addition, consideration shall be given to initiative in developing and improving the organisation of teaching, together with efforts to encourage students to develop independent and academic working practices.
  3. [When evaluating applicants for advertised positions or other new positions, consideration shall be given to the provisions of Article 6 of the Regulation on promotion and permanent appointment of academic staff at the University of Iceland, with regard to the assessment of research, teaching and other aspects of professional work. A minimum number of points for teaching shall not, however, be required. An evaluation committee may also take into consideration any data that may exist on applicants within the University concerning professional competence and contribution.]1
  4. Administrative experience, both within and outside the University, shall be assessed.
  5. The evaluation committee may also consider other employment experience that may be of value in the position applied for.

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 262/2010
2Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 546/2015.

Article 42.  Evaluation committee verdict

The evaluation committee shall begin its verdict with an explanation of the criteria and data on which it has based its assessment of the applicants and the methodology used in evaluating them. Data collected by the committee on applicants must be accounted for.

The evaluation committee must state only its reasoned verdict as to whether, on the basis of considerations outlined in Article 41, an applicant meets the minimum requirements in the relevant academic field to fill the advertised position or the position to which the applicant is requesting transfer. An evaluation committee may not rank applicants for an advertised position in order of preference. The verdict of the evaluation committee, or the majority of its members, shall be conclusive as to whether it considers an applicant to meet the minimum requirements or not. Should a disagreement arise within an evaluation committee, votes must be cast individually for each applicant, whereby committee members are required to take a position. A minority may explain the reasons for its position in a separate reasoned verdict. If the evaluation committee is unanimous, it shall submit a single verdict.

An evaluation committee verdict stating that an applicant meets minimum requirements signifies only that the applicant in question should be considered for the position.

Article 43.  Processing of the evaluation committee verdict and concluding actions

The evaluation committee shall send its verdict to the rector (or dean of school, in cases where the dean is in charge of the appointment), signed and dated by all committee members, along with the applicant’s resume and list of publications. As soon as the evaluation committee has sent the rector or dean of school its draft verdict, all documentation relating to the application should be forwarded to the selection committee.

If the rector or dean of school deems that the evaluation committee’s draft verdict or procedures do not comply with the law, the verdict shall be returned to the evaluation committee, which shall then rectify the defects. A letter to the evaluation committee shall indicate in what respects the work of the committee is considered unsatisfactory. If the rector or dean of school returns a verdict to the committee, applicants shall be notified of this.

Each applicant shall be sent the committee's verdict in its entirety. Applicants shall be given the opportunity to respond in writing to the verdict before it is sent to the selection committee for further processing. Applicants shall have seven days to submit their comments. [Applicants shall keep the verdict confidential.]1 Should the rector or dean of school deem that these comments give reason to do so, they may be referred, in whole or in part, to the evaluation committee. The committee may also be requested to provide further explanation of certain points. Comments from applicants and, where applicable, a query from the rector or dean of school and reply from the evaluation committee shall accompany the committee's verdict when it is forwarded to the faculty selection committee.

Should an applicant withdraw their application before the evaluation committee’s verdict has been forwarded to the selection committee, the applicant has a right to request to be omitted from the committee’s verdict, provided such a request is made in writing. After the aforementioned deadline has passed, an evaluation committee’s verdict shall not be altered for this reason. Once the rector or dean of school has sent the evaluation committee’s verdict to the selection committee, it shall be regarded as final and complete.

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 546/2015.

Article 44.  Appointment of selection committees

Each faculty shall have a standing selection committee, appointed by the relevant dean of school. [The dean of school may, in consultation with the school governing board, decide that a single selection committee shall be appointed for the school as a whole, cf. paragraph 6.]1  [The role of the selection committee is to review applications for academic positions at the school or faculty and institutes under the auspices of the faculty or school in question, and to provide the dean of school (or, as the case may be, the rector) with a statement concerning applicants prior to a decision being taken on appointment.]1 In the case of positions at institutes under the auspices of the University Council, the role of the selection committee shall be undertaken by the board of the institute concerned. In the case of positions within interdisciplinary programmes, the role of the selection committee shall be undertaken by the relevant board of study. Should a position at a school not fall under one specific faculty, the dean of school shall decide which selection committee is to process the matter.

A selection committee shall comprise five members. Only persons who have completed a doctorate or equivalent university degree may be appointed to serve on a selection committee, unless this is considered unfeasible. The majority of members on the committee should preferably have professorial competence. Both women and men shall sit on the committee, and care shall be taken to ensure that representation of either sex is not lower than 40%, cf. Article 15 of the Act on Equal Status and Equal Rights of Women and Men no. 10/2008. To this end, nominating parties shall nominate two representatives, a man and a woman. The deputy head of faculty shall be the alternate for the head of faculty on a selection committee. [The faculty, school governing board, department, institute and rector shall choose alternates for their representatives.]1

The composition of a faculty selection committee shall be as follows:

  1. The head of faculty, who is also the chair of the committee.
  2. One representative nominated by the faculty, appointed for a three-year term.
  3. Two representatives nominated in each case by the faculty council or head of faculty; these representatives must be specialists in the field under which the position falls. Should the faculty be divided into departments, one of these two representatives shall be appointed by the head of department.
  4. One representative nominated by the rector, appointed for a three-year term.

[In cases where a faculty is divided into departments, a person other than the head of faculty may be appointed as chair of the selection committee.]2

The composition of a selection committee for a position at an institute under the auspices of a faculty or school shall be as follows:

  1. A head of faculty, chosen by the dean of school, who is also the chair of the committee.
  2. Two representatives nominated in each case by the director of the institute; these representatives must be specialists in the field under which the position falls.
  3. One representative from the relevant faculty, nominated in each case by the faculty council or head of faculty; this representative must be a specialist in the field under which the position falls.
  4. One representative nominated by the rector, appointed for a three-year term.

The composition of a selection committee for a position offered in connection with a cooperative agreement with an institute outside the University shall be as follows:

  1. A head of faculty, chosen by the dean of school, who is also the chair of the committee.
  2. Two representatives nominated in each case by the director of the institute; these representatives must be specialists in the field under which the position falls. In the case of a position offered on the basis of an agreement with the Landspítali University Hospital, one of these two representatives shall be a division head at the hospital.
  3. One representative from the relevant faculty, nominated in each case by the faculty council or head of faculty; this representative must be a specialist in the field under which the position falls.
  4. One representative nominated by the rector, appointed for a three-year term.

[Should a dean of school choose to appoint a selection committee for the school as a whole (cf. paragraph 1, sentence 2), the composition of the school selection committee shall be as follows: 

  1. A head of faculty, chosen by the dean of school, who is also the chair of the committee.
  2. One representative nominated by the governing board of the school, appointed for a three-year term.
  3. Two representatives nominated in each case by the governing board of the school; these representatives must be specialists in the field under which the position falls.
  4. One representative nominated by the rector, appointed for a three-year term.]1

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 970/2009.  
2Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 546/2015.

 

Article 45.  Selection committee procedure

A selection committee may seek the opinion of specialists in the relevant academic field. A selection committee may ask the department concerned or, as the case may be, the relevant subject or centre, to attend a meeting with them.

The selection committee and board of the institute may decide to limit the selection to those applicants who are considered to best satisfy the considerations on which the awarding of the position is to be based. [...]1

A selection committee shall, as a rule, ask those applicants under consideration to an interview. The selection committee shall also, as a rule, invite applicants under consideration to give a lecture.

The statement of the selection committee shall present its conclusion as to which of the applicants judged by the evaluation committee to meet minimum requirements for the position is most eligible for the position on the basis of an overall assessment of all factors on which appointment to a position is based. [The selection committee shall assess the applicants' collaboration and communication skills, if such skills are stipulated in the advertisement.]1

[The chair of the selection committee is responsible for preparing the statement of the committee with supporting arguments. The selection committee is only required to provide supporting arguments for its selection of the most eligible applicant. The selection committee may recommend that no appointment be made, provided that there are valid reasons. The chair of the committee shall send the committee's statement to the Division of Human Resources, which sends it to the dean of school or, as the case may be, the rector. Efforts shall be made to send the statement within 30 days of the selection committee having received the documentation from the evaluation committee.]1

The rector shall provide a selection committee with a secretary. A selection committee may collect further data on applicants.

[If the rector or dean of school deems that the selection committee’s verdict or procedures do not comply with the law or regulations, or that the verdict is otherwise not adequate, the verdict shall be returned to the selection committee, which shall then rectify the defects. A letter to the selection committee shall indicate in what respects the work of the committee is considered unsatisfactory.

The rector or dean of school may return a verdict to the selection committee if that is considered necessary, for instance if the applicant who the selection committee finds most eligible for the position should decline the offer.]1

The University Council may establish further rules of procedure for selection committees.

1Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 546/2015.

Article 46.  Considerations for the selection of the most eligible applicant

When selecting the most eligible applicant, a selection committee shall take into account faculty policy and developments connected with the position in question. Selection shall also be based on those considerations outlined in Articles 34 and 41.

During its assessment, the selection committee may take into consideration how likely an applicant is, on the basis of previous record, to help realise the faculty’s and school’s objectives.

Assessment shall also be based on performance in interviews and lectures, should the decision have been taken to make use of such arrangements in collecting data.

CHAPTER IV
UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND STUDENTS
Article 47.  Admission of students

The rector and school deans under the rector’s authority are responsible for the admission of students to the University. The rules laid out in this chapter shall apply to the admission process.

Students commencing undergraduate studies at the University of Iceland shall have obtained an Icelandic matriculation examination or an equivalent qualification from a foreign school.

The University Council shall establish, upon receiving a proposal from the school concerned, more detailed regulation on the admission of students to specific undergraduate or postgraduate programmes. This regulation may, for instance, restrict access to specific programmes through further preparatory requirements beyond those prescribed in paragraph 1 of this Article or limit the number of students in undergraduate and postgraduate study where facilities are such that only a limited number of students can be provided with adequate teaching and training. This regulation shall indicate what type of matriculation examination, from one or more upper-secondary school study programmes, satisfies preparation requirements for study in the undergraduate programme concerned. If a general Icelandic matriculation examination from a specific upper-secondary school study programme is not sufficient preparation for a given undergraduate programme, additional requirements must be specified in detail. Any entrance or placement examinations and other methods used in selecting applicants must likewise be specified in detail. Admission requirements for Master’s and doctoral study shall be specified in separate regulation.

[Faculties may require that international applicants who do not have English as their native language prove their proficiency in English, either with a TOEFL certificate (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum grade of 79, or a certified transcript showing the results of their IELTS test (International English Language Testing System) with a minimum grade of 6.5. Such certificates shall be part of the application documentation. If a faculty requires such, this fact shall be clearly stated in the course catalogue and the admission requirements of the programme in question, as well as any other material on admission requirements.]1

Those who have completed one year of study (60 credits) from a recognised university or higher education institution can be considered to have met the general admission requirements for undergraduate study, in accordance with paragraph 1, regardless of whether they have obtained an Icelandic matriculation examination or an equivalent qualification from a foreign school. Further details on the admission of such individuals can be found in paragraph 3.

Persons who do not meet the requirements specified above in paragraphs 2 and 3 may be granted the right to commence undergraduate study at the University if they possess knowledge, competence and experience comparable to that provided by an Icelandic matriculation examination, in the opinion of the faculty concerned. The applicant should have, through study and employment experience, acquired a foundation regarded as comparable to that indicated by an Icelandic matriculation examination, in addition to further preparatory requirements in accordance with faculty regulation, if applicable. A Faculty may assess employment experience as equivalent to up to one year of upper-secondary school.

[The head of the Division of Academic Affairs shall determine whether admission shall be authorised, after receiving the opinion of the faculty in question. An applicant may refer a rejection from the head to the Board of Appeal to deal with higher education institution student complaints, cf. Article 20 of the Higher Education Institutions Act no. 63/2006. Applicants shall be instructed of their right to appeal when the head's decision is announced.]2

An exemption from the admission requirements outlined in paragraphs 2 and 3, granted on the basis of paragraph 4, grants permission to enrol only in the programme applied for, and only during that academic year. A granted exemption is, however, still valid when a student studying in accordance with University regulation registers for courses during the annual registration period. Should a student who has been admitted to a given study programme on the basis of an exemption wish to study in another programme, this student must apply for a special exemption, even if the latter programme is within the same school or faculty. The same applies if the student suspends study for one year or longer without the permission of the faculty concerned.

Applications for exemption from admission requirements must be accompanied by certified transcripts attesting to study and employment experience following compulsory education, and any other data that the applicant deems may support the application. Applications for exemptions for the coming academic year must have been received by the office of the University of Iceland Division of Academic Affairs no later than 5 June. Applications shall be processed as promptly as possible, and a decision reached, as a rule, no later than two months after the application deadline.

Information on faculty and programme admission requirements for undergraduate and postgraduate study – as well as information on enrolment restrictions and methods used for selecting students, where applicable – shall appear in the course catalogue, on the University website and in introductory material for new students. It must be clearly stated that admission requirements can differ between faculties and programmes; therefore, permission to register in one programme does not automatically bestow the right to register in another.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 74/2013.  
2Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 152/2010.

Article 48.  Enrolment of new students and annual registration

Only persons enrolled in studies and who have paid the registration fee shall be regarded as students at the University of Iceland. All students must register for courses for each semester, cf. paragraph 1 of Article 53, up to a maximum of 40 credits. Course registration is at the same time registration for an examination at the conclusion of the course. This applies regardless as to whether assessment shall take the form of a written or oral examination, practical work, an assignment or an essay. Students may, however, withdraw from examinations, cf. Article 57.

Reception of applications, enrolment of new students for undergraduate study and in courses is carried out by the University Student Registration each year, 5 June being the deadline for applications for the coming academic year. The deadline for applications for graduate study is 15 April. The deadline for international applicants wishing to enrol in graduate or undergraduate study is 1 February. The head of the Division of Academic Affairs may, in special circumstances, permit individual students to enrol at other times or to register for more than 40 credits per semester. A request for enrolment in undergraduate study must be accompanied by a photocopy or certified copy of an Icelandic matriculation examination or equivalent qualification from a foreign school.

Each year, students previously enrolled must register for courses and pay the registration fee; failure to do so will result in their being removed from the student registry and they shall no longer be considered students at the University of Iceland. Students are not entitled to attend lectures or practical classes or to sit examinations unless they are registered in the annual registration. Annual registration of students shall take place in March/April of each year, as further determined by the head of the Division of Academic Affairs.

Students may review their course registration for the autumn semester and the upcoming spring semester as further determined by the head of the Division of Academic Affairs.

Students wishing to suspend study for an entire semester or longer shall seek the permission of the relevant University faculty and register annually, for the duration of the leave, on the condition that they comply with provisions regarding the deadline for completing their studies. The period of leave can be up to a maximum of one year at a time, and does not prolong the maximum period of study in accordance with the regulations of the relevant faculty. The student must pay a portion of the registration fee during the period of leave.

The University Council shall set a special tariff for the issuing of certified transcripts and the preparation, implementation and marking of placement, entrance, makeup and distance examinations.

Article 49.  Registration fee

When registering for study, a student must pay a registration fee for each academic year, as stipulated in the national budget each year. Those granted permission to register outside the advertised registration periods may be charged a 15% higher fee. The University Council may allocate part of the registration fee to Icelandic Student Services and student organisations, in accordance with specific agreements.

The University Council shall approve more detailed regulation on the collection and disposition of the registration fee and other fees collected from students, which shall be published in the course catalogue and on the University website. This regulation shall provide for the due date and deadline for the registration fee, reduced fees (incl. for low-income students living with disability or invalidism) and refunds. When reducing or refunding the fee, the cost items of the fee, as defined on the basis of the law, shall be taken into account.

Article 50.  [Procedures for student complaints and appeals

Students believing their rights have been infringed, in relation to teaching, examinations, assessment, grading, evaluation of progress or anything else pertaining to teaching and examinations, shall submit a notification in writing to the relevant head of faculty. This notification must clearly outline the issue at hand, specifying the student's claim and any supporting arguments. Should the claim pertain to the relationship between student and supervisor during work on a final thesis, the head of faculty shall attempt to bring about an agreement between the parties as soon as possible. A new supervisor will not be appointed except in special circumstances.

The head of faculty shall address the issue as quickly as possible, generally ruling on it within two months of receiving notification at the latest. If the matter is extensive and expected to take longer to resolve, parties involved shall be notified and informed of when to except a ruling. The head of faculty shall respond to the student's claim with a formal reply, whether it pertains to a ruling on the student's rights or obligations, as defined in the Administrative Procedures Act no. 37/1993, or otherwise to teaching or the student's examinations. The head of faculty may as needed seek the opinion of the faculty meeting on the matter. In such cases, the provisions of this Article apply, as appropriate, to the procedure and ruling of the faculty meeting.

Should a student not accept the final ruling of the head of faculty on his or her rights or obligations, he or she may refer the matter to the University of Iceland Complaints Committee for student issues, cf. Article 7 of this Regulation. The Committee shall determine the student's rights. If a student's notification to a head of faculty does not concern an issue that can be resolved with a final decision on his or her rights or obligations, the student may seek the Committee's opinion on whether the head of faculty has handled his or her written claim in accordance with the applicable law and best administrative practice. Neither the head of faculty nor the Complaints Committee will reassess examination papers or the professional conclusions of teaching staff or external examiners.

An applicant for a postgraduate programme may refer a rejection to the Complaints Committee. This stipulation does not apply to a rejection for undergraduate studies, cf. paragraph 7, Article 47 of this Regulation. A case may not be referred to the Complaints Committee until the final ruling or opinion of the head of faculty has been issued or three months have passed since a notification was first submitted in writing to the head of faculty.

Rulings of the Complaints Committee under this Article may be referred to the Board of Appeal to deal with higher education institution student complaints, cf. Article 20 of the Higher Education Institutions Act no. 63/2006. The Board does not reassess examination papers or the professional conclusions of teaching staff, evaluation committees or external examiners. Cases cannot be referred to the Board of Appeal before the Complaints Committee has issued a ruling, or three months have passed since the complaint was first submitted in writing to the Committee. Students shall be instructed of their right to appeal when rulings under this Article are issued.]1

1Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1077/2013.

Article 51.  Student rights and obligations and disciplinary sanctions

Students at the University of Iceland must refrain from anything in their studies or conduct inside and outside of the University that may dishonour them, damage their reputations or compromise their studies or the University.

If a student is suspected of the behaviour described in paragraph 1, or if a student is found guilty of breaking the law or violating the rules of the University, the relevant head of faculty shall be alerted to the matter. In the case of a violation liable to affect the student's grades, only the relevant member of teaching staff can make such a decision. However, the head of faculty shall oversee the handling of the matter, in consultation with teaching staff. Should the head of faculty be alerted to such a matter, cf. paragraph 1, the student shall be notified immediately and given a suitable amount of time to make a statement on the matter, in writing where appropriate, providing this is not evidently unnecessary. Taking the student's response into consideration, it shall be judged whether or not the student has violated a rule and the effect this shall have on the student's grades, where applicable. The student shall be informed of the faculty's decision in writing. At the same time, the head of faculty shall forward the matter to the dean of school as soon as possible for a verdict regarding disciplinary sanctions, cf. paragraph 3, Article 19 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008. There is no need to give the student further opportunity to comment at the faculty level. The notification sent to the dean shall describe the alleged offence.]1

Should the student be found guilty of misconduct, cf. paragraph 1, or of behaviour in violation of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008 or rules set in accordance with that Act, the dean of the relevant school shall process the case. Depending on the gravity of the offence, the student may be formally reprimanded or expelled from the University, on a temporary or permanent basis. Before the decision to expel a student is taken, the student in question shall be given an opportunity to present a statement on the matter. Students may refer the dean's decision to the Board of Appeal to deal with higher education institution student complaints, cf. the Higher Education Institutions Act no. 63/2006. Such an appeal shall defer execution of the dean's ruling.

The rector may, after a reasonable length of time, authorise a student who has been permanently expelled to enrol again at the University if circumstances have changed. In such cases, students may refer a rejection from the rector to the Board of Appeal.

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 1077/2013.

CHAPTER V
ORGANISATION OF STUDY, TEACHING, TEACHING METHODS, ASSESSMENT, EXAMINATIONS, ETC.
Article 52.  The academic year, semesters and graduation

The academic year shall be considered to extend from 1 July to the same date the following year. The University teaching year shall be divided into two semesters, an autumn semester from 20 August until 18 December and a spring semester from 4 January until 10 May.

Each teaching year shall have the following holidays:  Christmas break, from 19 December to 4 January, and Easter break, from the Wednesday preceding Maundy Thursday until the Tuesday following Easter Monday. The first and final days are included in the breaks. In addition to these breaks, teaching shall be suspended on the first day of summer, 1 May and 1 December. The rector or school deans may decide that teaching is to be suspended on specific days for special reasons.

Graduation ceremonies shall take place on the last Saturday in February and the Saturday closest to mid-June each year. The rector may determine departures from these dates and whether graduation ceremonies shall take place once or twice a year. Such changes and departures from the rule shall be advertised at least two months in advance.

Article 53.  Organisation of study, study programmes and assessment of study credit value

University studies are organised into study programmes and shorter diploma programmes, in accordance with The National Qualification Framework for higher education in Iceland, issued by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. Each study programme concludes with one of the degrees listed in Article 55, conferred in a subject within a faculty or in an interdisciplinary subject. A University faculty may specify different fields of specialisation within programmes, e.g. so that an undergraduate programme includes a major and a minor. A degree is then awarded in the major, except in cases where the student has studied two majors, in which case a degree is awarded in both majors. The specialisation (including majors and minors) shall appear on the degree certificate, with a more detailed description in the diploma supplement.

Preparation and organisation of new degree or diploma programmes shall be conducted in accordance with the rules of procedure set by the University Council.

Teaching at the University of Iceland shall be offered in courses, which are evaluated in credits. Full-time study is considered to be 60 credits per academic year and reflects all academic work, class attendance and examinations. A course should be worth a minimum of 5 credits.

A faculty may give credit for study completed by a student outside the faculty, including study at another university, as part of study in the faculty, on the condition that such study meets comparable quality and study requirements as those made on the basis of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008 and the Higher Education Institutions Act no. 63/2006.

If one faculty performs teaching for another faculty, the credit value assigned by the former faculty shall likewise apply for the latter. If individual students take courses in a faculty other than their own, their home faculties shall evaluate the credit value of these courses.

A decision as to whether study that has previously been accepted as valid towards a degree in the same faculty or in another faculty should be given credit shall be left to the discretion of the faculty concerned. Each faculty shall adopt specific rules on the joint utilisation of credits toward more than one degree.

Article 54  [Teaching, teaching methods, handling of sources and submission of final theses]1

Lectures, practical exercises and courses within University faculties are intended for registered students, but teaching staff may provide others with access, unless a University faculty states otherwise.

Schools shall adopt general rules on teaching, teaching methods and assessment, indicating clear objectives concerning the quality of teaching and studies and upon what criteria these are based. University Council resolutions on quality criteria and requirements for teaching and studies shall be complied with. Faculties may, with the consent of the school dean, authorise slower student progression than is prescribed in the relevant faculty chapters in this Regulation.

Faculties set rules applying to obligatory participation in individual courses, exercises, practical or field work, as well as rules on the direction and overseeing of students’ study in other respects. They may also stipulate that attendance and participation in class count towards course assessment. Faculty rules must appear in the course catalogue.

Students are strictly prohibited from using the intellectual property of others in essays and assignments, unless sources are cited in conformity with recognised academic practice.

[At the Bachelor's and Master's level, students shall submit final theses  electronically to the Skemman.is database, maintained by the National and University Library, in a format determined by the library. The head of the Division of Academic Affairs may permit that a final thesis be submitted in paper format if valid reasons so warrant.]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1156/2015.

Article 55.  Academic titles and degree certificates

The academic titles conferred by the University of Iceland are as follows:

1. 

Baccalaureus artium and Baccalaureus scientiarum, Bachelor of Education, BA/BS/BEd., 3-4 years of study, depending upon subject.

2.1.

Master’s degree, Magister artium, Magister scientiarum, Magister paedagogiae, Master of Public Administration, Master of Laws, Master of Social Work, [Master of Information Science]1, Master of Health Informatics, Magister juris, Magister theologiae, Master of Accounting, [Master of Finance,]3 [Master of Applied Statistics]2 Master of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Public Health, Master of Education, MA / MS / MPaed / MPA / LLM / MSW / [MIS]1 / MHI / Mag.jur. / Mag. theol. / M.Acc. / [M.Fin.]3 / [MAS]2 / MS Pharm Sci / MS Pharm / MPH /MEd., generally 2 years of study following a BA / BS degree or comparable study, or in accordance with the details provided in a faculty’s special rules for the study programme, or rules determined by the University Council concerning interdisciplinary Master's programmes.

2.2.

Candidate degrees, candidatus theologiae (cand. theol.), candidatus medicinae (cand. med.), candidatus pharmaciae (cand. pharm.), candidatus oeconomiae (cand. oecon.), candidatus obstetriciorum (cand. obst.), candidatus odontologiae (cand. odont.), candidatus psychologiae (cand. psych.), 4-6 years of study, depending on programme.

3.1.

Doctoral degree, philosophiae doctor (Ph.D.), Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), following an MA / MS or Candidate degree (if applicable) or comparable study.

3.2.

Doctoral degree, doctor theologiae (dr. theol.), doctor philosophiae (dr. phil.), doctor medicinae (dr. med.), doctor pharmaciae (dr. pharm.), doctor juris (dr. jur.), doctor oeconomiae (dr. oecon.), doctor odontologiae (dr. odont.), doctor scientiarum ingeniarium, (dr. scient. ing.), doctor scientiarum (dr. scient.), as a rule conferred after the submission of a thesis to be defended without preceding programme of organised study, cf. Article 70 of this Regulation.

3.3.

Honorary doctorates: doctor philosophiae honoris causa, doctor medicinae honoris causa, etc., cf. Article 67 of this Regulation.

Faculties shall determine which of the titles they confer (dr. phil, dr. jur. or Ph.D.), cf. items 3.1 and 3.2, regardless of whether structured doctoral study or a doctoral degree without preceding organised study is concerned. Faculties shall choose one of these titles. The University Council may authorise a Faculty to deviate from this provision in exceptional circumstances.

The School of Business (Faculty of Business Administration) may confer the degree of Master of Business Administration, MBA, upon the completion of 90 credits of continuing education study offered by the Faculty, provided this complies with the provisions of Article 64 of this Regulation on continuing education offered by faculties. The Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science may, in the same manner, confer the degree of Master of Project Management, MPM, following the completion of 90 credits of continuing education study.

Faculties may confer a separate qualification, a diploma, following completion of a shorter programme of undergraduate study, which shall not, however, be fewer than 90 credits.

On completing the programme, a candidate shall receive a qualification certificate signed by the head of faculty. A doctoral certificate shall also be signed by the dean of school, cf. Article 67 of this Regulation.

Special rules shall apply to the issuing of diplomas for joint degrees, cf. Article 62 of this Regulation.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 138/2014.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 21/2015.
3Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 161/2016.

Article 56.  [Examinations and examination periods

Examinations may be written, oral or practical.

University teaching staff are responsible for course assessment and examinations; each faculty shall determine modes of examination in accordance with the law and University regulation. The duration of written examinations shall, as a rule, be no longer than three hours.

[General examinations are held from 2 to 18 December, and from 25 April to 10 May, as further determined by individual faculties in consultation with the director of examinations. Examinations or assessments in individual subjects may, however, be held at other times, in accordance with the decision of the director of examinations. [Makeup examinations shall be held following the general examination periods in December and May during a four to six-day period, as further determined by the director of examinations.]3 Faculties may, after having consulted the director of examinations and with the approval of the governing board of the school in question, choose to use the makeup examination period in the spring semester for makeup examinations in individual courses for both semesters. Decisions regarding this must have been taken by the time teaching starts in the autumn semester.]2

Makeup examinations may be held for competitive examinations, where the number of students who will be entitled to continue their studies has been determined in advance by the University Council, and also for examinations where circumstances are such that a student has the option of graduating at the next graduation ceremony following the examination period.

The examination schedule for general examinations shall be published in the course catalogue, if possible, but otherwise with two months' notice. The examination schedule for makeup examinations following general examination periods in December and May shall be published as soon as possible and no later than two days prior to the first examination day. Only a head of faculty can change an advertised examination date, having first consulted with the director of examinations and obtained the written assent of all those registered in the examination in question.]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1024/2009.
2Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 226/2011.
3Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 832/2011.

Article 57.  [Resitting examinations and withdrawal from an examination]1

[Students may sit an examination in each course twice. Should students fail an examination, leave after the examination begins or fail to attend an examination without accounting for their absence, they are permitted to sit it the next time a general examination is held for the course, within a year at the latest. Should they then fail the examination, leave or fail to attend without accounting for their absence, they shall have lost their right to sit it again. Withdrawal from an examination shall be completed online, or emailed to the Student Registration, no later than 1 October for examinations in the autumn semester, 1 February for examinations in the spring semester and no later than 24 hours after the publication of the makeup examination schedule. Should no withdrawal be received before the deadline, students are considered to have confirmed their registration for the examination for the relevant course. [A faculty shall determine whether exemptions from the provisions of this Article shall be granted, due to incidents concerning the health or well-being of a student, or to other exceptional and unmanageable circumstances.]4

[Faculties may, in consultation with the director of examinations, arrange special resit examinations in individual courses. Special resit examinations of this kind are intended solely for those students who have previously sat an examination in the respective course; they shall be held in conjunction with the makeup examinations in the spring semester following the general examination period in May, as further determined by the director of examinations. The final examination date shall be no later than two weeks before the June graduation ceremony. Before the end of January and before 25 May, information shall be posted on which examinations for courses in the relevant semester will be repeated. Faculties may furthermore, in consultation with the director of examinations, hold resit examinations in individual courses where a student has the option of graduating at the next graduation ceremony upon passing the examination.]3

Students may also resit examinations they have passed, within a year of passing, on the condition that an examination in the same course is held within this period. On beginning the second examination or assessment, results from the first shall become invalid. Where a group of subjects are organised together in one assessment, students must resit examinations in all subjects of the assessment if they do not wish to accept the former examination results.

A special fee shall be charged for a resit examination, as further determined by the University Council.]2

[Temporary provisions
Despite the provisions of item 2 of paragraph 2, cf. also paragraph 3, Article 56, the following shall apply for the academic years 2016-2017 and 2017-2918. The School of Engineering and Natural Sciences is authorised, having consulted with the director of examinations, to give students at faculties of the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences the option of sitting makeup examinations and resit examinations for the autumn semester over two working days at the beginning of January, alongside makeup examinations for other schools where possible, as well as on Saturdays in the second and third week of January. This opportunity for students is optional for the academic year 2016-2017, but will apply for all students at faculties within the School for the academic year 2017-2018.]5

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1024/2009.
2Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 226/2011.
3Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 832/2011.  
4Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 1077/2013.
5Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 807/2016.

Article 58.  Implementation of examinations and examination rules

The University director of examinations shall handle the preparation and direction of examinations in consultation with school and faculty administration.

Examinees may not assist or seek help from other examinees in completing the examination. Neither may a registered student, who is not sitting the examination, provide such assistance. Examinees may not speak to one another, nor may they bring books, materials or equipment with them other than those authorised by a member of teaching staff, unless otherwise specifically provided for in faculty rules. The same shall apply to the completion of other assignments, unless a member of teaching staff determines otherwise. A violation of these and other examination rules, set by the University Council, shall lead to expulsion from the examination and, as the case may be, disciplinary sanctions as provided for in Article 19 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions.

Written examination papers shall be marked with an examination number and grades published under the same identification; a faculty may nevertheless set rules for exemptions from this principle. Grades may also be published under a special student number allocated to each student by the Student Registration.

The University Council shall establish further regulation concerning examination invigilation and the implementation of examinations.

Article 59.  External examiners and a student's right to receive explanations

One examiner from outside the University shall be present at oral examinations. The teaching staff concerned shall be solely responsible for marking written and practical examinations, including speeches and presentations on projects, unless the faculty determines otherwise. In competitive examinations, where the number of students who will be entitled to continue their studies has been determined in advance by the University Council, there shall be an external examiner for each examination subject.

[Students have the right to receive from teaching staff an explanation of the evaluation of their written examination papers, if requested within 15 days of grades being published. A presentation explaining evaluation of written examination papers may be held earlier, with the express consent of a student who has sat a makeup or resit examination and is registered for graduation. Teaching staff may hold a presentation for all students in a course to explain the evaluation of written examination papers. Should a student, having failed an examination, not accept the assessment of a member of teaching staff, he or she may contact the head of the relevant faculty. An external examiner shall then be appointed in each case. This, however, does not apply to entrance examinations. A majority of the students in a particular course may, by submitting a reasoned argument, request that an external examiner be appointed to assess written examination papers for the final examination for the course. An external examiner appointed following the publication of grades shall only review the examination papers of those students who have requested a reassessment. Furthermore, teaching staff, should they believe there is particular reason to do so, may request the appointment of an external examiner for an individual examination, in which case the examiner shall review the papers of all students in the course. However, an external examiner will not be appointed if more than six weeks have passed from the publication of grades until the request for appointment is received.]1

The dean of a school shall appoint external examiners on receiving proposals from University faculties. Only those who have completed a recognised university degree in the subject to be assessed and are recognised in their field may be appointed as external examiners. External examiners shall be appointed for a three-year period except when appointed in accordance with paragraph 2 of this Article.

If no suitable examiner outside of the University can be found in Iceland who fulfils the requirements outlined in paragraph 3 of this Article, the dean of a school is entitled to appoint a member of University teaching staff to the position, having received a recommendation from the faculty.

1Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 1077/2013.

Article 60.  Examination questions and assessment of papers

The member of teaching staff and external examiner, if one has been brought in, shall jointly decide upon the examination questions in each subject and mark the papers. As wide a selection as possible from the examination material shall be examined. The member of teaching staff and external examiner, if one has been brought in, shall separately grade each paper in each examination subject. Each shall award an independent grade for an examination paper, both of which shall apply equally in the final grading. Grades shall be published two weeks after each examination at the latest, but three weeks after each examination in the December examination period. The same deadline applies for courses which end without a written examination and for examinations and assignments outside the regular examination periods. The University Council shall establish special rules of procedure regarding the return of grades.

The conclusion of an external examiner appointed after the initial grades have been published may lead to a lower or higher grade than that published, when weighed against the assessment of the member of teaching staff, cf. paragraph 1. However, this does not apply to cases in which an external examiner was appointed retroactively at the request of a member of teaching staff. In those circumstances, the conclusion of an external examiner can only lead to a higher grade than that published, if applicable.

The role of an external examiner brought in after the official assessment of a member of teaching staff, is restricted to reviewing examination papers for that particular examination. In these circumstances, the external examiner shall not review the structure of the examination in terms of the course material.

Article 61.  Grades, their storage and minimum grades

Grades shall be awarded in whole numbers, or in whole and half numbers, from 0 to 10. The grade point average shall be the weighted mean of all grades included in the programme. The grade point average shall be calculated to two decimal places: 9.00-10.00 is first class with distinction, 7.25-8.99 is first class, 6.00-7.24 is second class and 5.00-5.99 is third class.

A student receiving a grade lower than 5.0, or the equivalent letter grade, is considered to have failed. Exceptions may be made for individual examinations, assessments and examination categories, which may require a higher or lower minimum grade. Such exceptions shall be stipulated in chapters on faculties in this Regulation.

Specific faculty provisions for minimum grades higher than 5.0 in individual examination subjects, assessments or examination categories are valid only for students of the respective faculty.

In competitive examinations, where the number of students who will be entitled to continue their studies has been determined in advance by the University Council, grades may, as determined by the faculty, be calculated with more exactitude than indicated in paragraph 1 in order to determine the outcome of the competitive examination. Notice shall be given of a faculty decision concerning the calculation of grades in competitive examinations at least four weeks in advance of the examination. Grades in competitive examinations shall also be given in whole and half numbers, cf. paragraph 1, and shall thus be entered in the University student registry.

[...]1

Furthermore, a grade of pass/fail may be awarded for a final project (thesis) in a postgraduate programme, provided that a substantive evaluation appears in the comments on the project. The decision of a faculty – or of a department under the authority of the faculty – to exercise this option shall apply to all final projects within the programme in question. This decision may be amended at any time, and an amended decision shall then apply to final projects begun by students after that time. Grades are not awarded for doctoral degrees.

A student’s performance in practical work shall be assessed by the member of teaching staff responsible for it. Teaching staff must submit written reports to the University Student Registration. Four grades shall be given: excellent, good, satisfactory or unsatisfactory. A student receiving the grade unsatisfactory is not considered to have completed the practical work and shall not be entitled to take an examination in the subject. A grade of pass/fail, or complete/incomplete, may be given for practical work, or other study with the approval of the school teaching committee,  Grades for practical work may also be given as figures, cf. paragraph 1, or letters, cf. paragraph 3.

Grades shall not be made public under a student’s name or identification number.

The University Student Registration shall handle the recording and storage of grades in a secure manner.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 887/2016.

Article 62.  Recognition of degrees from other universities

A University faculty shall determine whether and to what extent university degrees taken by a student at other universities shall be recognised. It shall seek the opinions of teaching staff in the subject concerned before taking a decision. Care shall be taken to comply with international agreements on the recognition of university education and qualifications to which Iceland is a signatory.

In the case of degrees taken at a university or comparable educational institution elsewhere in the Nordic countries, assessment of such shall be made, where appropriate, in accordance with joint Nordic regulation on recognition of completed courses.

Upon completing a study programme organised jointly by the University of Iceland and another university or universities, in accordance with an agreement concerning this, a student shall receive two equivalent degree certificates, one from each university. The same shall apply if more than two universities are party to such an agreement. On each degree certificate, it shall be stated that this is a degree issued jointly by these universities on the basis of an agreement. A diploma supplement shall give a clear outline of the study programme, the involvement of each university and the nature of the collaboration. Graduations for these students shall be as per the terms agreed upon by the universities in each given instance.

University of Iceland faculties may also issue a joint degree certificate with the distinguishing mark of both (or all) participating universities. One university shall then see to the graduation. It shall be stated on the degree certificate that this is a degree issued jointly by these universities on the basis of an agreement and that a single joint degree certificate has been awarded.

University of Iceland faculties may also offer joint degree programmes, for which they shall issue a joint degree certificate with the distinguishing mark of both (or all) participating faculties. A special board of study shall be appointed for such interdisciplinary collaboration, to which participating faculties shall be a party. Special study programmes may be organised in this way, cf. Article 53.

Article 63.  Further rules

Further rules may be found in the chapters on individual faculties in this Regulation, concerning assessment, examination subjects, resitting examinations, division of qualifications into several parts, preparatory examinations, grades, maximum lengths of study or of individual study components and consequences if these provisions are not followed.

Article 64.  [Continuing education provided by University faculties and lifelong learning for the public

University faculties may offer continuing education for graduates in accredited fields. The term continuing education refers to the following:

  1. Courses for university graduates within their field.
  2. Supplementary studies for university graduates on an interdisciplinary basis, aiming at a specific qualification or degree.

University faculties may offer lifelong learning for the public in accredited fields. The term lifelong learning refers to the following:

  1. Lectures, education, seminars and courses on certain subjects, cf. also Article 65.
  2. Individual courses or a collection of courses forming a coherent entity. Faculties are responsible for such courses which may, as appropriate, be given a credit value. Such courses are only open to those meeting admission requirements, cf. Article 47 of this Regulation. However, the combined credit value of all courses making up a whole, offered for a fee, must never exceed 60 credits.

Continuing education and individual courses given a credit value, cf. item b of paragraph 2, provided by University faculties are subject to the following conditions:

  1. A student must, upon admission to a programme, meet admission requirements in accordance with Article 47 of this Regulation. A faculty may make more detailed provisions concerning admission, and stricter admission requirements may be set by faculty resolutions.
  2. The faculty shall be responsible for all such study and may assign it a credit value.
  3. A faculty may reach an agreement with a third party concerning certain logistical aspects, such as student enrolment, handling of finances, accounting, premises, publicity and so on; academic responsibility, however, shall always remain with the faculty.
  4. A faculty may decide that a continuing education study programme under its auspices shall conclude with a special qualification. This shall be indicated in the faculty's chapter in this Regulation.
  5. Continuing education study as provided for in this Article is separate from the conventional programmes and courses offered at a faculty. Individual courses which are part of a regular Master's programme, may however be offered as continuing education courses, for a fee. For conventional study, a faculty is prohibited from collecting fees other than the registration fee, cf. item a, Article 24 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions. Organised postgraduate study, in accordance with Article 69 of this Regulation, may not be included under the provisions of this Article.
  6. The dean of the relevant school is required to authorise teaching staff to participate in such projects and determine whether they are part of their regular duties.

Fee collection for continuing education and lifelong learning for the public shall be carried out in accordance with items e and f, Article 24 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions. The University Council must approve a faculty's resolutions regarding continuing education within the faculty and the collecting of fees for this.]1

1Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 1143/2011.

Article 65.  Lifelong learning for the public

Lifelong learning for the public as offered by faculties and institutes under the auspices of schools or faculties may entail, as appropriate, courses for the general public, lectures, seminars, general presentation of school, faculty and institute activities and other activities not included under regular teaching, studies and continuing education offered by a faculty or institute.

CHAPTER VI
MASTER'S AND DOCTORAL DEGREES
Article 66.  University of Iceland Graduate School

[The University of Iceland Graduate School shall oversee and implement established standards and requirements for the quality of postgraduate studies at the University of Iceland, with the aim of promoting robust and internationally competitive research work.

University faculties shall bear academic responsibility for postgraduate studies at the University. The Graduate School shall have comprehensive oversight of postgraduate studies, working closely with schools, faculties, the University Council Quality Committee and central administration. The Graduate School shall thus act as a platform for consultation and cooperation in matters concerning postgraduate studies within the University, and as a contact for partners both in Iceland and abroad. Interdisciplinary study programmes may be formally located at the School and are defined in cooperation with those faculties concerned. Other universities may be affiliated with the Graduate School, on the condition that they meet with academic requirements for offering doctoral study in the academic discipline in question and are accredited as such by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. A special agreement must be made concerning such affiliation.

The role of the Graduate School is to guarantee and promote the quality of Master’s and doctoral study at the University of Iceland and contribute to its development in conformity with the decisions of the University Council. Schools and faculties shall provide the Graduate School with any required information and documentation. It shall fulfil its role by, among other things:

  1. encouraging improvement of quality and contributing to the growth and development of postgraduate studies in all respects, in particular doctoral study,
  2. defining and implementing shared standards and requirements as to the quality of postgraduate study, monitoring the compliance of operational research-based postgraduate programmes with current standards and requirements, ensuring that course offerings are adequate and confirming faculties’ descriptions of new postgraduate programmes, cf. rules of procedure regarding preparation and organisation of new programmes at the University of Iceland,
  3. overseeing, and where appropriate verifying, faculties’ compliance with general rules on admission requirements, the admission process, entrance examinations for doctoral students where applicable, study plans and progress, deadlines that must be met in order for students to be able to complete postgraduate study, including confirmation of enrolment, the annual progress report of doctoral students and that the recording of credits is in accordance with the actual study plan,
  4. ensuring that postgraduate students remain continuously registered at the University for the duration of their studies; reviewing and recording faculty decisions regarding applications for postgraduate study, study plans for research-based Master’s programmes and changes thereof; and recording and confirming study plans for doctoral programmes and changes thereof,
  5. receiving matters from doctoral students who consider the relevant school, faculty or programme to have failed to meet established standards and requirements regarding the quality of doctoral studies at the University,
  6. monitoring compliance with the provisions of item 4, Article 69 of this Regulation, stipulating that a faculty member of academic staff may not be admitted to a doctoral programme within that faculty,
  7. verifying whether supervisors for postgraduate study meet established standards and requirements, and recognising them as partners at the Graduate School,
  8. providing references and confirming faculty recommendations for opponents for doctoral defences, cf. item 2, Article 70 of this Regulation,
  9. acting as a platform for consultation and cooperation in matters concerning postgraduate studies within the University and requirements made of postgraduate students and supervisors,
  10. contributing both to the coordination and diversity of postgraduate studies at the University, closely monitoring developments in postgraduate study at an international level and focusing on ensuring that postgraduate studies at the University conform at all times with internationally recognised quality standards,
  11. handling the University of Iceland's affiliation with the Council of Graduate Schools in the USA and the Council for Doctoral Education at the European University Association (EUA) and, as applicable, other international associations regarding postgraduate studies,
  12. encouraging international collaboration and cooperation with universities abroad concerning matters such as joint research projects and joint degrees, and maintaining individual cooperative agreements on postgraduate studies and joint degrees, in consultation with the Division of Academic Affairs,
  13. encouraging cooperation between University, industry and research institutes in the research projects of Master's and doctoral students,
  14. strengthening understanding of the interests of postgraduate study and postgraduate students,
  15. maintaining, analysing and disseminating data and information on all primary components of postgraduate studies at the University, including grants and statistics on postgraduate study in Icelandic and English, and publishing a handbook for doctoral students on its website containing detailed information and instructions on doctoral studies at the University of Iceland,
  16. encouraging the union of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows at the University of Iceland to participate in international cooperation with comparable associations,
  17. handling the production of the postgraduate study course catalogue in consultation with faculties and the Division of Academic Affairs,
  18. organising instruction, conferences, round table discussions and lectures on subjects relating to the role and aims of the Graduate School, postgraduate studies in general and scientific work at the University, and
  19. if applicable, making recommendations to the University Council on rules and/or criteria promoting the quality of Master's and doctoral studies at the University of Iceland.

The rector shall engage the director of the Graduate School for a five-year term and prepare a formal statement of duties outlining the responsibilities of the position in greater detail. The director must possess academic competence and extensive knowledge of postgraduate study at the university level.

The University Council shall appoint a five-member board comprising representatives from the University’s schools to assist the director. The director shall chair this board.

Board meetings shall be held at least once per semester. The director shall call meetings via letter or email, with at least three days' notice. A meeting notice shall outline the agenda of a meeting. A board meeting must be called if two or more board members so request. In the event of a tie vote at a board meeting, the director shall cast the deciding vote. A register of board minutes shall be maintained, and attested minutes shall be entered into the register. A copy of the minutes shall be sent to the rector.

The task of the board is to advise the director on all decisions regarding policy for the Graduate School and the implementation of its role (cf. paragraph 3) and provide opinions on operational plans and other business relating to the School’s activities.

The director is answerable to the rector and University Council for the Graduate School’s finances, shall prepare an operational and financial plan in consultation with the board and make recommendations to the University Council on budgetary resources and their allocation, along with the apportionment of other income, where applicable.

The director shall oversee the day-to-day operations of the Graduate School, including management of human resources, where applicable, finances and projects.

The hiring of other personnel shall be in accordance with the provisions of the Regulation for the University of Iceland.

A formal evaluation of the operations and activities of the Graduate School shall take place at regular intervals, as further determined by the University Council.]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 600/2012.

Article 67.  The title of Doctor and doctoral certificate

University faculties have the right to confer the title of Doctor. Such a title may either be awarded honoris causa, or following a special examination. Faculties shall arrange doctoral examinations. An honorary doctorate shall not be conferred except at the recommendation of the faculty and the governing board of the school, with the approval of three-fourths of all faculty members with voting rights and the approval of the University Council. Voting on the awarding of an honorary doctorate may be carried out electronically. Student representatives at faculty meetings shall have voting rights on the awarding of honorary doctorates.

Following a doctoral examination, or when an honorary doctorate is awarded, the dean of the school shall present the doctor with a doctoral certificate, signed by the dean of school and head of faculty.

The University Council shall establish specific criteria regarding the awarding of honorary doctorates.

Article 68.  Admission to doctoral study

A person wishing to defend a doctoral thesis shall, as a rule, have completed a Candidate or Master’s degree. A University Faculty may organise doctoral study in individual subjects, in accordance with the detailed provisions of Article 69 of this Regulation and provisions on study in the chapters on the faculties concerned. Doctoral study shall conclude with a doctoral examination. Any further rules set by a faculty on such study must be approved by the school governing board and confirmed by the University Council, upon having received the opinion of the Graduate School.

Students who meet the requirements of the faculty in question concerning previous study may apply for admission to a doctoral programme. A faculty may arrange assessment examinations for applicants.

Article 69.  Organised postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees

1. Standing committees
Each faculty authorised by the University Council to confer Master’s or doctoral degrees shall have a special standing committee to handle issues concerning postgraduate study. The role of the standing committee shall include addressing applications for admission and approving changes to study plans, cf. item 3 of this Article, appointing external examiners, cf. item 11, and dealing with any other business entrusted to it by the faculty. Faculty standing committees shall consult with each other on courses offered at the Master’s and doctoral levels, cf. item 8, and act as contact points for the University of Iceland Graduate School, cf. item 18. A faculty may assign individual tasks of the standing committee to its departments.

A school may choose to have a single common standing committee, with one representative from each faculty. A standing committee for a school may function as a faculty standing committee and replace faculty standing committees, or it may act as a consultative committee for faculties, in which case it shall be composed of the chairs of faculty standing committees. The school standing committee or the consultative committee of faculty standing committees shall oversee relations with the Graduate School.

2. Application deadline
The application deadline for admission to Master’s or doctoral study at the University shall, as a rule, be 15 April; the deadline for international applicants shall be 1 February. If a faculty permits postgraduate students to enrol in the spring semester, the application deadline for this shall be 15 October. Applications for admission to doctoral study may be accepted at other times in exceptional circumstances.

3. Processing of applications
Applications for admission to Master’s and doctoral study shall be submitted to the Student Registration. After recording relevant information, applications shall be addressed by the relevant school or faculty standing committee, cf. item 1, and a decision shall be subsequently taken by the faculty. Processing of international applications received by 1 February, cf. item 2, shall be completed by 30 April. Processing of applications received by 15 April for enrolment in the autumn semester shall be completed, and a reply sent, by 25 May. Processing of applications received by 15 October for enrolment in the autumn semester shall be completed, and a reply sent, by 15 November.

Faculties shall determine the information that must accompany an application for admission to a Master’s programme. Applications for doctoral study must, as a rule, be accompanied by a draft study plan, a description of the research project and research schedule. A faculty may require that an application be accompanied by a detailed account of the study plan and research project. Changes to the study plan for doctoral study are subject to the approval of the doctoral board and confirmation of the Graduate School. Should a faculty reject a student's application, it must give grounds for doing so. The Student Registration must be notified of the outcomes of all applications.

Further information on the procedure for applications for admission to Master’s and doctoral study shall be published in the University course catalogue.

4. Admission requirements
Faculty rules shall stipulate prerequisite qualifications for study in each instance. A faculty shall also make provision for requisite minimum grades in previous study, if applicable. Other prerequisites must be outlined, should students be granted exemptions from the requirement to hold the specified qualifications. If there are further requirements for admission, such as passing an entrance examination for doctoral study, they shall be specified. A faculty member of academic staff may not be admitted to a doctoral programme within that faculty.

[Faculties may require that international applicants for Master's or doctoral programmes who do not have English as their native language prove their proficiency in English, either with a TOEFL certificate (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum grade of 79, or a certified transcript showing the results of their IELTS test (International English Language Testing System) with a minimum grade of 6.5. Such certificates shall be part of the application documentation. If a faculty requires such, this fact shall be clearly stated in the course catalogue and the admission requirements of the programme in question, as well as any other material on admission requirements.]1

5. Number of credits and length of study
Faculty rules shall specify the length of time estimated for normal student progression and the maximum length of study. A faculty may stipulate in its rules that students may enrol in a four-year Master’s programme from the time of their admission; in such cases it is assumed that students will complete 30 credits per year. Upon graduation, it must be demonstrated that a student has been registered and has paid the registration fee for the entire period of study.

A Master’s degree shall, as a rule, consist of 120 credits and a doctoral degree a minimum of 180 credits following completion of a Master’s degree. University Council resolutions on quality standards and requirements for teaching and studies shall be complied with.

If a faculty authorises a student to enrol directly in doctoral study without a Master’s degree, the doctoral programme shall consist of at least 240 credit units and the length of study shall be no shorter than four years. Provision shall be made for this in Faculty rules.

6. Composition of study
Faculty rules must specify a minimum number of credits to be completed through courses and through the final project/thesis. A Master’s programme shall, as a rule, comprise 60 credits from courses, seminars and reading courses. Even where this component of the study may be smaller, it may never make up fewer than 30 credits. Faculty rules shall stipulate requirements for reading courses.

In exceptional cases, a Faculty may, with the approval of the school governing board and confirmation from the University Council, organise a Master’s programme without a research-based final project or Master’s thesis, on the condition that quality of study is guaranteed by other means, ensuring it is equivalent to other Master’s programmes within the University. Any further rules set by a faculty on Master's programmes with the approval of the school governing board must be confirmed by the University Council, upon having received the opinion of the Graduate School, cf. Article 66.

7. Relationship between Master's and doctoral study
Faculty rules shall account for possible integration of and relationships between Master’s and doctoral study, with regard to courses, postgraduate seminars and final theses. A Master’s thesis may not be re-used as the basis for a doctoral thesis.

8. Undergraduate courses as part of postgraduate study
Faculty rules must specify the maximum number of credits from undergraduate courses that may be used for postgraduate study. These rules must specify whether such courses confer fewer credits at a Master’s level than for undergraduates, or whether additional requirements are made, concerning, for example, minimum grades for Master's students taking undergraduate courses, should they receive the same number of credits for the courses as undergraduate students.

9. Tutors and supervisors 
Upon commencing study, each postgraduate student shall be assigned a tutor, with whom to discuss the organisation of study, selection of courses and other aspects of the programme. The tutor and the student shall jointly submit a study plan to be approved by the faculty.

A supervisor shall assist the student with the final project. A faculty may, however, permit a student to have an external supervisor, provided that this individual meets the requirements set in this Regulation and in the rules of the faculty concerned.

10. Requirements of persons assessing studies and final projects
A tutor must always be a University of Iceland member of academic staff in the subject in question. Supervisors from outside the aforementioned group must hold at least a Master’s degree in the subject area in order to supervise students in a Master’s degree programme and must otherwise hold a doctorate or its equivalent. Care must be taken to ensure that students' projects fall under the specialisations of their supervisors. Supervisors of Master’s and doctoral students must meet requirements set by criteria and requirements for the quality of study. They must furthermore be recognised specialists in the field concerned and have published works connected to the student’s project in an arena with high academic standards.

11. Doctoral and Master's degree committees
Faculty rules shall specify the composition of Master’s degree committees and the demands made of committee members. In cases where a tutor is not a supervisor, the former shall also sit on the doctoral or Master's degree committe as the case may be.

A Master’s degree committee must include at least two persons with specialist expertise, one of which shall be the student’s tutor. A third member may be appointed to the committee, for example if the project concerns more than one faculty. The faculty shall appoint the Master’s degree committee. Faculty rules shall stipulate in greater detail the responsibilities of a Master’s degree committee and how it is to be appointed. Its role is to keep track of the progress of study, see to it that it complies with the plan of study, ensure the academic quality of research work in accordance with Faculty rules and look after examinations that a student must sit, if applicable. The standing committee, cf. item 1, shall appoint an external examiner, who shall assess the final thesis together with the Master’s degree committee. If the main emphasis of a Master’s programme is on course work, with a small research project of 30-40 credits, it is not necessary to appoint a committee for each student. In such a case, the tutor shall ensure that the progress of study corresponds to the study plan and shall at the same time be responsible for the academic quality of the programme.

A doctoral committee shall be comprised of three to five persons with special expertise, appointed by the faculty, at least one of whom shall not be a full-time staff member at the faculty in question. The role of a doctoral committee is similar to the role of a Master’s degree committee. It shall summon the doctoral candidate to meet before it as necessary during the course of study and shall examine the candidate’s general academic knowledge and research methodology in the field concerned. Such an examination shall take place approximately midway through the course of study. Before the doctoral defence can be held, the doctoral committee must deliver a reasoned verdict to the faculty as to whether the doctoral candidate should be given the opportunity to submit the thesis for defence.

12. External examiners and opponents
An external examiner shall always evaluate the final project of a Master’s student jointly with the Master’s degree committee.

The provisions of item 2, Article 70 of this Regulation shall apply to opponents for doctoral defences and to the holding of doctoral defences.

13. Assessment
As soon as a thesis is submitted, a certified summary of the student’s progression shall be made available for assessment by the Master’s degree committee or doctoral committee. Rules shall provide for the assessment and organisation of examinations. The provisions of Article 61 of this Regulation shall apply to grades for Master’s programmes.

14. Submission and format of final projects
Faculty rules shall stipulate the submission deadline for a final project. The number of copies of the final project, resulting costs and submission to the National and University Library shall also be provided for. It must be clearly indicated that the final project was completed at the University of Iceland; the supervisors, school, faculty and, if applicable, research institute concerned shall be named, as shall any University funds that have supported the project. A thesis may be in a language other than Icelandic, and a faculty may permit a candidate to speak a language other than Icelandic during a doctoral defence. Every doctoral thesis must be accompanied by an abstract in Icelandic and English.

15. Connections with other universities
A faculty may decide that part of a Master’s or doctoral programme shall be completed at another university. A Master’s or doctoral degree may also be awarded jointly with another university, cf. Article 62.

16. Academic titles
Article 55 of this Regulation shall apply concerning academic titles.

17. Confirmation of faculty regulations 
Faculty regulations on Master’s or doctoral study shall enter into force when the University Council has approved them, upon receiving a statement from the Graduate School, cf. Articles 66 and 68 of this Regulation. In so doing, the University Council affirms that the regulations are in accordance with the provisions of this Regulation and that the study programmes in question are based on satisfactory academic foundations.

18. Monitoring of compliance with rules and standards
The University of Iceland Graduate School, working in close cooperation with faculties, the University Council Quality Committee and central administration, shall monitor faculties’ compliance with general rules on Master’s and doctoral study and shared standards and requirements as to the quality of study, cf. also Article 66 of this Regulation.

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 74/2013.

Article 70.  Doctoral degrees without a prior programme of organised study
  1. A doctoral degree without a prior programme of organised study shall involve the composition of a thesis or theses and an oral defence. Individual faculties may also, with the approval of the University Council, require that a doctoral candidate deliver one or more lectures on academic material. The doctoral thesis must comply with requirements concerning academic methodology and comprise an original contribution by the doctoral candidate to the academic discipline in question. The thesis must be judged and defended in accordance with University regulation on doctoral theses and doctoral defences.

    An application to undergo a doctoral examination must be addressed to the faculty concerned. The application must be accompanied by three copies of the thesis submitted.

    Should a person desiring to take a doctoral examination submit more than one thesis, the theses must concern the same main area of research and form a relatively coherent unit. In such instances, a special overview shall be compiled, summarising the material of the individual theses and drawing overall conclusions.

    The application must furthermore be accompanied by references from three parties regarding the significance that the thesis may have for research in the relevant field and for Iceland’s academic community. All three referential parties shall be recognised experts in the academic field.

    Should the thesis concern a discipline not studied at the University of Iceland, a faculty may refuse to assess the applicant’s thesis on these grounds.

    A thesis shall be accompanied by a detailed abstract in Icelandic and English. A faculty may permit a candidate to speak a language other than Icelandic during a doctoral defence.

    Should it prove impossible to find qualified members for an evaluation committee to assess a thesis, a faculty may request that the work be submitted in an Icelandic translation or in another language accepted by the faculty.
     
  2. The faculty research-based study committee (standing committee, cf. paragraph 1 of Article 69) shall address the doctoral candidate’s application and the accompanying references. The committee shall determine whether the application meets quality requirements, e.g. with regard to the criteria that apply to doctoral study. Particular care shall be taken to ensure that the doctoral thesis includes a comprehensive discussion of the status of knowledge in the academic field in question. The committee may gather additional references, if needed, in order to evaluate the application, based on the criteria mentioned above. If improvements are needed, in the opinion of the committee, it shall inform the applicant of this. Otherwise, it shall recommend to the head of faculty that the faculty appoint a three-person evaluation committee to assess the academic value of the written works accompanying the application. The members of an evaluation committee must meet the requirements for members of evaluation committees as per Chapter III of this Regulation. Chapter II of the Administrative Procedure Act no. 37/1993 shall apply concerning the specific eligibility of committee members. Persons from outside the University may be appointed to an evaluation committee. The evaluation committee shall deliver a reasoned verdict to the faculty in writing. The unanimous verdict of the evaluation committee, or of a majority of its members, must be unambiguous as to whether the thesis is considered to meet the requirements demanded of a doctoral thesis. If the evaluation committee is not unanimous, the minority may explain its position in a separate verdict. If the evaluation committee is unanimous, it shall submit a single verdict.

    If the majority of members of an evaluation committee agree that a work submitted by an applicant does not meet the requirements demanded of a doctoral thesis, the faculty shall not permit the applicant to undergo a doctoral examination. The same shall apply if the majority of the evaluation committee supports such a verdict. If the majority of the evaluation committee finds the thesis satisfactory, the faculty shall determine whether the applicant should be given the opportunity to undergo a doctoral examination.

    If the faculty deems the thesis acceptable for defence it shall then appoint two opponents for the oral defence of the thesis, upon having received the opinion of the Graduate School. Opponents may have been members of the evaluation committee.

    The applicant shall, in such a case, have the thesis printed, if this has not already been done, and deliver four copies to the University of Iceland.

    The doctoral candidate shall subsequently publicly defend the thesis at the University on the date determined by the faculty. The thesis must be available at the faculty office and in the National and University Library for four weeks prior to the defence.

    The head of faculty shall chair the defence. Should anyone who is not an official opponent wish to speak concerning the thesis of the doctoral candidate, this person shall inform the head thereof at least 24 hours prior to the defence. The head may, however, allow a person from the audience to comment briefly without such prior notice. Following the oral defence and lecture, if such is held, the head of faculty, together with the opponents, shall decide whether the title of Doctor shall be awarded. If there is disagreement thereupon, the matter shall be referred to the faculty meeting.

    Student representatives at a faculty meeting shall not have voting rights on matters concerning the awarding of doctoral titles, cf. the provisions of this Article and Article 69 of this Regulation.

    The University Council shall establish special rules of procedure regarding the holding of doctoral defences.
CHAPTER VII
FEES FOR SERVICES, DISPOSITION OF FEES, CONTRACTS, ETC.
Article 71.  Fees for services

The University may charge a registration fee, which students pay when they register for studies. This registration fee shall total the sum of the University’s expenses arising from student registration and student services that do not qualify as expenses associated with teaching and research activities, cf. Article 24 of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008. Fees may be collected to cover the costs of issuing certified transcripts and preparing, implementing and reviewing assessment, entrance, makeup and distance examinations. Fees may also be collected to cover the costs of services that do not qualify as services that the University is obliged to provide. Fees may also be collected for providing continuing education and lifelong learning for the public. Otherwise, tuition fees may not be charged at the University of Iceland.

Fees under paragraph 1 shall not exceed the cost accruing from providing the service and shall only be used to cover the expense resulting from it. Those granted permission to register outside the advertised registration periods may, however, be charged a 15% higher fee.

The University Council shall establish detailed rules concerning the services for which fees may be charged and shall adopt a tariff, which shall be reviewed annually.

Article 72.  Non-governmental income and contracts

If a school, faculty or institute of the University acquires non-governmental income, it must produce a written contract concerning such. The provisions of Article 73 of this Regulation shall apply concerning overhead charges on non-governmental income. The contract shall make provision for:

  1. What services the school, faculty or institute in question undertakes to provide and what requirements are made in connection with this.
  2. Payment for the service/project and when payment is to be made.
  3. The duration and notice period of the contract.

If a school, faculty or institute provides services in competition with other parties, their provision may not be subsidised through an allocation to the University of Iceland in the national budget or on the basis of a service contract with the Minister of Education, Science and Culture or the Minister of Finance.

Contracts involving substantial financial outlays or long-term obligations must be confirmed by the rector.

Article 73.  Overhead charges

The University Council may determine that the University’s schools and faculties shall collect overhead charges on all non-governmental income, including the income of institutes under their auspices. Furthermore, it may be decided that they shall collect overhead charges on grants from research funds, contributions or grants from individuals, enterprises or institutions. In compiling their budgets, schools shall take into account income from overhead charges as applicable. The University Council may, furthermore, decide that part of the income from overhead charges shall go towards the University of Iceland Research Fund.

Article 74.  Participation in enterprises

The University of Iceland may, with the approval of the Minister of Education, Science and Culture, be a party to research and development enterprises that are shareholding companies, private limited companies, non-profit organisations or companies with limited liability engaging in production and sale of products for the purpose of disseminating, utilising and developing the results of research and development projects currently in progress at the University.

The University of Iceland may participate in a shareholding company, private limited company, non-profit organisation or a company with limited liability to the extent that this is compatible with the role assigned to the University by law.

The University Council shall control the University’s holding in enterprises as mentioned above, but it may grant a school or other party within the University a mandate for its management.


CHAPTER VIII
FUNDS TO SUPPORT RESEARCH, TEACHING AND ADMINISTRATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ICELAND AND STUDENT SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ACTIVITIES
Article 75.  The University of Iceland Research Fund

[The purpose of the University of Iceland Research Fund is to strengthen research at the University of Iceland. The University of Iceland Research Fund is divided into a project fund and a doctoral fund.

The University Council shall determine the annual allocation to the Fund.

The board of the Research Fund comprises the chairs of five independent review panels, one for each school.  The chair of the board shall be appointed by the University Council in accordance with a nomination from the rector. The rector shall appoint the review panels, comprising four to five experts, one of whom shall be primarily employed outside the University. The role of the review panels is to professionally evaluate and prioritise applications to the University of Iceland Research Fund, the Research Fund doctoral fund and the University of Iceland Eimskip Fund. The chairs of the review panels meet regularly while the evaluation of applications is underway. Professional evaluation shall be based on criteria set by the University Council Science Committee. A project manager from the University Division of Science and Innovation works with the board of the Fund and the review panels.

The board of the Research Fund manages allocations from the Fund on the basis of proposals from the review panels.

Teaching and research staff at the University of Iceland and its institutes, primarily engaged in research and who have been appointed based on a qualifications assessment, may apply for grants from the Fund. Additionally, postdoctoral fellows who fulfil the Fund’s conditions may apply for special postdoctoral grants, which the board of the Fund may advertise. The board of the Fund is also authorised to advertise travel grants for doctoral students.

Assessment of projects shall be based primarily on their academic value and the research activity of the applicant. The board of the Fund shall ensure that experts in the field in question provide a professional opinion on all new applications from applicants eligible for grants.

The University Council Science Committee sets criteria for the board of the Research Fund and the review panels regarding allocation of grants and determines the division of funding between the project fund and the doctoral fund, cf. paragraph 1.

Following each allocation, the board of the Research Fund shall submit a report on the matter to the University Council and the Science Committee.]1

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 807/2016.

Article 76.  The University of Iceland Academic Affairs Fund

The purpose of the University of Iceland Instructional Affairs Fund shall be to encourage innovation in teaching methods and improvements to teaching at the University.

The University Council shall determine the annual allocation to the Fund.

Management of the Fund shall be in the hands of the University Council Academic Affairs Committee, and the Committee chair shall also be chair of the board of the Fund.

The board of the Fund shall award grants from the Fund. The board may set guidelines for awarding grants, which shall be confirmed by the University Council. These guidelines may allow that the board itself establish projects supported by the Fund.

Professors, senior lecturers, lecturers and adjunct lecturers may apply for grants from the Fund.

Assessment of projects shall be based primarily on whether they involve substantial and interesting innovations in teaching methods or attitudes to course material, or whether the preparation of teaching materials on a major scale is at issue, either in written or other form. Grants are intended to cover expenses for, e.g., the work of assistants and for costs incurred. The board of the Fund shall ensure that qualified persons in the field in question provide a professional opinion on all applications from applicants eligible for grants. The board itself may establish projects that grants are awarded to.

The board of the Fund shall submit a report to the University Council on grants awarded from the Fund at the close of each calendar year.

Article 77.  The University of Iceland Equipment Purchasing Fund

The purpose of the University of Iceland Equipment Purchasing Fund shall be to strengthen research and teaching at the University. The Rector shall appoint a three-person board for the Equipment Purchase Fund in accordance with the nomination of the Science Committee, the Academic Affairs Committee and the Finance Committee.

[The University Council shall determine the annual allocation to the Fund.]1

[The board of the Fund shall allocate funds for purchasing specialised equipment on the basis of applications and the prioritisations of schools.]1

Equipment bought using grants from the Equipment Purchasing Fund shall be the property of the University of Iceland.

The head of the [Division of Science and Innovation]2 shall submit an annual report to the University Council on the allocation of equipment purchasing funds.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 830/2015.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 74/2013.

Article 78.  The University of Iceland Productivity Evaluation Fund

The purpose of the University of Iceland Productivity Evaluation Fund shall be to strengthen research and administration at the University.

The University Council shall determine the annual allocation to the Fund.

Management of the Fund shall fall to the productivity evaluation committee, which shall adopt guidelines approved by the University Council. The rector shall appoint the productivity evaluation committee in accordance with nominations from the Union of University Teachers and the [Division of Science and Innovation.]1

Members of the Union of University Teachers holding positions at least 50% employment may apply for payment from the Fund for research in excess of their research obligations, as indicated by a productivity evaluation.

The evaluation of research shall be based on a research assessment system, which is part of the formal quality assessment system of the University of Iceland operating in accordance with rules established by the University Council. The productivity evaluation committee must, where applicable, consult with the Union of University Teachers in order to ensure consistency in evaluation of the work of University personnel.

The rector shall award payments from the Fund for administrative work. The rector may delegate responsibility for such awards to the head of the Division of Human Resources.

The productivity evaluation committee shall submit an annual report to the University Council on allocations from the fund.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 74/2013.

Article 79.  The University of Iceland Union Fund

The University of Iceland Union Fund operates on the basis of Advertisement no. 11/1919.

The purpose of the Fund is to support scientific activities in Iceland and connections between Iceland and Denmark, cf. Article 2 of the aforementioned Advertisement.

The University Council shall oversee the Fund. The rector shall the awarding of grants from it.

The University Council shall establish rules on allocation consistent with the purpose of the Fund.

In addition to its own non-governmental income, the University Council shall determine the annual allocation to the Fund.

Article 80.  The University of Iceland Assistantship Fund

The purpose of the University of Iceland Assistantship Fund is to support the University's schools in hiring doctoral students as teaching assistants and to enable teaching staff to hire research and/or teaching assistants, with the aim of strengthening doctoral studies at the University and allowing students to acquire competence and experience in academic working practice.

The income of the Assistantship Fund shall be an annual contribution determined by the University Council.

The Graduate School shall see to the awarding of grants.

Professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, adjunct lecturers, research scientists, research scholars and research specialists at the University of Iceland may apply to the Fund for grants. Grants are awarded to cover the wages of an assistant. An assistant must, as a rule, be a student at the University of Iceland; alumni may, however, be hired as assistants within one year of graduating.

In awarding grants, the board of the Fund shall assess the need for the work of the assistant, the academic and educational value of the project for the assistant, which shall be unequivocal, whether working facilities are available and whether the project is likely to strengthen scientific and academic activities within the University.

Each year, the Graduate School shall inform the University Council of grants awarded.

Article 81.  The University of Iceland Students Fund

The role of the University of Iceland Students Fund shall be to strengthen the social, academic and cultural activities of students at the University of Iceland and to further international student relations.

The board of the Fund shall comprise five representatives appointed for a one-year term; appointments shall be made no later than 15 September each year. Two persons shall be appointed by the Student Council and three persons shall be appointed after an election at a general meeting of leaders of student societies. The rector shall appoint an observer to the board of the Fund.

At its first meeting each year, which must be held no later than 1 October, the board shall elect a chair and decide on the internal division of other duties. The role of the chair shall be to direct the operations of the Fund.

The board of the Fund shall record minutes of its meetings. The chair of the Student Council may attend board meetings as an observer but does not have voting rights. A board meeting shall have a quorum if at least four board members are present.

The board of the Fund shall award grants at least twice per semester. The first grant shall be awarded no later than 1 November. The Student Council shall oversee payments from the Fund in accordance with the decisions of the board.

The University Council shall determine the amount of money the Fund shall have at its disposal. The Fund may also supplement this income with any donations and contributions it receives.

The provisions in this Regulation on the University of Iceland Students Fund may not be amended without seeking the opinion of the Student Council concerning proposed amendments. The Student Council may set rules concerning applications for grants, awarding of grants and the obligations of award recipients. These rules may assign the board of the Fund the task of establishing guidelines concerning the awarding of grants.

The board of the Fund shall send its annual accounts to the Rector together with a report on how its assets have been used.

Article 82.  University of Iceland scholarship funds

The University of Iceland has custody of scholarship funds, which shall normally be governed by special charters. The University Council shall supervise these funds and appoint a special board to oversee the management of funds in accordance with special rules of procedure. Scholarship funds shall be presented on the University website.

CHAPTER IX
ANNUAL FORUM
Article 83.  University Annual Forum

Each year the University of Iceland shall hold an open annual forum, at which University finances and the main aspects of its operational plan shall be presented.
 

PART II
 

UNIVERSITY SCHOOLS AND SPECIFIC RULES FOR EACH UNIVERSITY FACULTY
 

CHAPTER X
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

The faculties of the School of Social Sciences are: the Faculty of Social and Human Sciences; the Faculty of Social Work; the Faculty of Economics; the Faculty of Law; the Faculty of Political Science; and the School of Business (Faculty of Business Administration).

Faculties shall work in close cooperation with each other in order to make optimal use of human and financial resources, facilities, instruments and equipment in the interests of furthering and diversifying education and research.

The School of Social Sciences and its faculties shall likewise encourage close collaboration with University central administration and other University schools and faculties.

The provisions of Chapter II of this Regulation shall apply concerning school and faculty administration and other items pertaining to these same rules. Admission requirements for individual faculties and study programmes shall be as provided for in rules established by the University Council, cf. Article 47 of this Regulation. The University Council shall also establish rules on University institutes and Master’s and doctoral programmes for each faculty.

FACULTY OF SOCIAL AND HUMAN SCIENCES
Article 84.  Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Social and Human Sciences shall provide teaching for the following:

Major subjects for a BA degree:  […]1 sociology, anthropology and folkloristics.

Master’s and doctoral degrees in academic disciplines within the Faculty. Master’s or doctorate in Public Health Sciences and in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.

The Faculty of Social and Human Sciences shall set further rules concerning study, which shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Faculty of Social and Human Sciences comprises the following departments, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation:  [sociology, disability studies, anthropology, career counselling and guidance and folkloristics.]5

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

Subjects defined as major subjects may also be offered as minor subjects, as may other social science subjects, as further determined by the Faculty.

The Faculty of Social and Human Sciences may arrange undergraduate programmes consisting of 60-90 credits; a 90-credit programme shall confer a diploma.

A BA degree shall require at least 180 credits: 120 credits in a major subject and 60 in a minor subject or in additional courses in the major subject.

The Faculty may offer supplementary study, consisting of up to 90 credit units, following the completion of a qualifying university degree. Study for school librarians is organised as a one-year supplementary study programme.

Postgraduate study is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Social and Human Sciences and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation. Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

An MA degree shall, as a rule, require 120 credits following the completion of a BA degree. MA programmes may be offered in all major subjects at the Faculty of Social and Human Sciences that can be taken for a BA degree. Such study may be arranged as a research-based programme, with a final project of at least 30 credits.

The Faculty may also arrange doctoral study programmes of at least 180 credits in conformity with the provisions of this Regulation.

[An MIS (MIS (Master of Information Science)]6 is a 120-credit Master's programme in [information science]5 following the completion of a BA degree or comparable study in a subject other than [information science.]5 Students complete 60 credits of coursework, 30 credits of practical study and a 30-credit Master’s thesis or final project relating to some aspect of [information science.]5

The MA in Career Counselling and Guidance is a specially organised 120-credit Master’s programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree.

[...]8

The MA in Disability Studies is organised as a 120-credit research-based programme or a 90-credit vocational research-based programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree.

The MA in Museum Studies is an independent 120-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree.

The MA in Development Studies is a 120-credit programme.

The MA in Old Nordic Religion is a specially organised 120-credit Master’s programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree.

[The MA in Methodology is an independent 120-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree.]8

The Diploma in Sociology is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Sociology.

[...]2

The Diploma in Museum Studies is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's degree, on the condition that admission requirements are met.

The Diploma in Disability Studies is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Disability Studies.

The Diploma in Development Studies is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Development Studies.

The Diploma in [Information Science]5 is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in [Information Science]5 (an MA or an [MIS]6).

The Diploma in Anthropology is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Anthropology.

[...]3

[The MA in [Global Relations]7 is a 120-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree.

[The Diploma in [Global Relations]7 is a 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's degree, on the condition that admission requirements are met.]4

Legislation and regulation on professional qualifications are taken into consideration when organising study programmes in the fields of [information science]5 and career counselling and guidance.

Students may be admitted to specially organised postgraduate and supplementary study programmes every other year.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 929/2013.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 307/2013.
3Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 74/2013.
4Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 152/2010.
5Amended by Article 8 of Regulation no. 1077/2013.
6Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 138/2014.
7Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 315/2014.
8Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.

Article 85.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BA programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

The same course may comprise part of more than one major or minor subject, but it may only be included once in the total number of credits completed by a student.

A student may take a minor subject in another faculty, having received the approval of the Faculty of Social and Human Sciences and the faculty offering the subject in question.

The Faculty may determine that a student may not enrol in a course without having previously acquired the right to take the examination, or having passed examinations in specific courses. Requirements may also be made regarding academic performance in order to proceed from one year to the next.

Each department shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Examinations may be written and/or oral. Teaching staff may, with the approval of the department, assess essays, work assignments and practical exercises as part of an examination. If there are two or more examination components in a course, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of a member of teaching staff, require that students achieve a specific minimum grade in each of the components. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The School of Social Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in certain courses or subjects, should there be cause to do so. In such cases, rules concerning the process of student selection shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Social and Human Sciences.

FACULTY OF SOCIAL WORK
Article 86.  Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Social Work shall provide teaching for the following:

BA in Social Work.
MA in Social Work with Professional Recognition.
MA in Social Work.
[...]1
MA in Family Therapy.
MA in Gerontology.
NordMaG in Gerontology.
Doctorate in Social Work.

The Faculty of Social Work shall set further rules concerning study and admission requirements, which shall appear in the course catalogue.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Social Work and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation. Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

A BA degree shall require 180 credits in a major subject.

An MA degree shall, as a rule, require 120 credits following the completion of a BA degree. 

A doctorate shall, as a rule, require 180 credits following the completion of an MA degree.

The MA in Social Work with Professional Recognition is a 120-credit study programme for certification as a social worker, following the completion of a BA in Social Work. The programme comprises of courses, vocational training and a 30-credit final thesis. Upon completion of the MA programme, the graduate can apply to register as a certified social worker, cf. the Social Work Act no. 95/1990.  

The MA in Social Work is a 120-credit research-based programme, following the completion of a BA in Social Work. The programme comprises of courses, methodology courses and a 40-60-credit final thesis.

[...]1

The MA in Family Therapy is a 120-credit programme, following the completion of a BA, BS, BEd or equivalent degree in health and/or social sciences. The programme comprises of courses and a 30-credit final thesis.

The MA in Gerontology is a 120-credit programme, following the completion of a BA, BS, BEd or equivalent degree in health and/or social sciences. The programme comprises of courses, methodology courses and a 40-60-credit final thesis.

The NordMaG (Nordic Master’s Programme) in Gerontology is a 120-credit programme arranged in partnership with the University of Jyväskylä and Lund University, following the completion of a BA, BS, BEd or equivalent degree in health and/or social sciences. The programme comprises of courses, methodology courses and a 40-60-credit final thesis.

The Diploma in Social Work is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Social Work, on the condition that admission requirements are met.

The Diploma in Child Protection is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Social Work, on the condition that admission requirements are met.

[The Diploma in Vocational Rehabilitation is an independent 60-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Social Work, on the condition that admission requirements are met.]1

[The Diploma in Supervision in Social Work is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of the MA in Social Work with Professional Recognition or an equivalent degree, entitling the holder to an authorised professional title. In addition, at least four years of employment experience is required, within the area of social or health services, education or the legal system. This programme may be evaluated towards a research-based Master's in Social Work, on the condition that admission requirements are met.

The Diploma in Multicultural Social Work is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of the MA in Social Work with Professional Recognition. This programme may be evaluated towards a research-based Master's in Social Work, on the condition that admission requirements are met.]2

The Diploma in Gerontology is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Gerontology, on the condition that admission requirements are met.

Students may be admitted to specially organised postgraduate and supplementary study programmes every other year.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1233/2013.
2Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 887/2016.

Article 87.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BA programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

The Faculty may determine that a student may not enrol in a course without having previously acquired the right to take the examination, or having passed examinations in specific courses. Requirements may also be made regarding academic performance in order to proceed from one year to the next.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Examinations may be written and/or oral. Teaching staff may, with the approval of the Faculty, assess essays, work assignments and practical exercises as part of an examination. If there are two or more examination components in a course, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of a member of teaching staff, require that students achieve a specific minimum grade in each of the components. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The School of Social Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in certain courses or subjects, should there be cause to do so. In such cases, rules concerning the process of student selection shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Social Work.

The Faculty is responsible for the postgraduate education of social workers, as budgetary considerations and other circumstances allow.

FACULTY OF ECONOMICS
Article 88.  Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Economics shall provide teaching for the following:

BS in Economics.
BA in Economics.
MS in Economics.
MS in Health Economics.
MS in Financial Economics.
MA in Economics and MS/MA in related subjects.
Ph.D in Economics.

Master’s degrees in environment and natural resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.

[The Faculty may offer supplementary study following the completion of a qualifying university degree.

The Diploma in Economics is an independent 60-credit programme, following the completion of a BA/BS degree or an equivalent university degree. Part of this programme may be evaluated towards the MS in Economics.

The Diploma in Health Economics is an independent 60-credit programme, following the completion of a BA/BS degree or an equivalent university degree. Part of this programme may be evaluated towards the MS in Health Economics.

The Diploma in Financial Economics is an independent 60-credit programme, following the completion of a BA/BS degree or an equivalent university degree. Part of this programme may be evaluated towards the MS in Financial Economics. In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.]1

Study shall be assessed in credit units, with one year’s study comprising 60 credit units. A BS or BA degree shall require 180 credits. An MS/MA degree shall require at least 90 credits. More detailed rules on MS/MA programmes than those outlined in this Chapter shall be approved by the University Council, cf. the provisions of Articles 66 and 69 of this Regulation.

The Faculty may arrange a postgraduate programme leading to a doctorate in economics, in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty and approved by the University Council, cf. the provisions of Articles 67-69 of this Regulation.

The structure of BS and BA programmes is based on three years or six semesters of study. BS and BA programmes shall be offered, on which the Faculty shall establish further rules.

The examination subjects for the BS and BA degrees are microeconomics, macroeconomics, mathematics, statistics and other subjects as determined by the Faculty, totalling 180 credits.

The structure of MS programmes is based on three semesters of study. An MS programme shall consist of at least 90 credits: 60 credits from courses and a 30-credit thesis. Students wishing to complete a 120-credit MS shall have the opportunity to submit a 60-credit thesis, or may seek permission to complete 90 credits from courses. The Faculty shall set more detailed rules on admission requirements, study programmes and study requirements.

The structure of MS programmes is based on three semesters of study. An MA programme shall consist of at least 90 credits: 60 credits from courses and a 30-credit thesis. Students wishing to complete a 120-credit MA shall have the opportunity to submit a 60-credit thesis, or may seek permission to complete 90 credits from courses. The Faculty shall set more detailed rules on admission requirements, study programmes and study requirements.

Students shall choose their study programmes and electives and may, subject to the approval of the Faculty, choose electives from other faculties.

The subject of a student’s thesis shall be chosen in consultation with at least one lecturer, senior lecturer or professor at the Faculty. A BS thesis shall be assessed as 6-12 credits. An MS/MA thesis shall be assessed as 30 or 60 credits. The Faculty shall set further rules concerning weighting of theses, their composition and submission. Students may be examined orally on the subjects of their theses and performance assessed as part of the thesis grade. The supervisor and an external examiner shall award the grade for an MS/MA thesis.

The Faculty may arrange studies for students registered in other faculties at the University of Iceland.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 94/2012.

Article 89.  Student progression, examinations, minumum grades and maximum length of study

The Faculty of Economics shall determine the prerequisites which shall apply regarding the admission of students to specific courses. Teaching staff may, with the approval of the Faculty, assess essays and practical exercises as part of an examination, and require minimum grades for each assessment in a subject. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue. The Faculty may hold practical courses outside of normal teaching hours.

Examinations shall be written unless the Faculty determines otherwise. Examinations shall be held at the conclusion of courses. Resit examinations are to be held following the general examination periods in December and May, cf. Articles 56 and 57 of this Regulation.

The minimum passing grade required in subjects within the Faculty of Economics shall be 5.0 unless otherwise stipulated. The Faculty may set higher minimum grade requirements in individual subjects.

To graduate from the Faculty of Economics, a student must achieve an average grade of 6.0.

Students studying for an MS/MA must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. Students studying for a BS/BA must have completed the programme no later than five years after enrolling. The Faculty may grant exceptions to these time limits should illness or other valid reasons so warrant.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Economics. A student cannot graduate with a degree from the Faculty without having completed at least 60 credits within the Faculty.

FACULTY OF LAW
Article 90.  Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Law shall provide teaching for BA and Master's degrees in Law. A Master’s in Law is the equivalent of a Candidate degree. Persons completing a Master’s programme in the Faculty of Law shall be awarded the academic title of Magister juris (mag. jur.). The Faculty shall also provide teaching for the Master's in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

Teaching shall be provided in course subjects, which are assessed in credits. Study for a BA in Law shall be equivalent to 180 credits. Study for a Master's in Law shall be equivalent to 300 credits, i.e. 120 credits from postgraduate studies following the completion of a BA degree.

[...]1

Postgraduate study for a Master's in Law is 120 credits. Study consists of 90 credits of coursework and a 30-credit thesis. A student graduates with a Master’s in Law, Magister juris (mag. jur.). [...]1

The Faculty of Law may offer special study for a Master’s degree or doctorate in law, in Icelandic or English, in accordance with further rules set by the Faculty and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation. Students completing a Master’s in International Environmental and Natural Resources Law, after having completed a BA in Law or equivalent study, shall be awarded the academic title of LL.M. (Master of Laws).

The Faculty of Law shall set further rules on study at the Faculty, including rules on BA study and postgraduate study in law.

The Faculty of Law shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 629/2013.

Article 91.  Student progression, examinations, minimum grades and maximum length of study

[...]1

To pass examinations in the BA in Law, students must achieve a minimum grade of 6.0 in each of their subjects. The final grade for the BA in Law shall be calculated as the weighted mean of grades received in individual subjects.

[Examinations shall be written unless the Faculty determines otherwise.]1

Students are not permitted to take the same examination in a BA subject more than four times. A student who fails an examination four times in the same subject within the BA programme may not continue to study in the Faculty of Law.

The Faculty of Law may assess legal studies undertaken at other universities as part of the BA programme.

A student must have completed a BA in Law no later than in the calendar year when five years have elapsed since enrolling in the BA programme at the Faculty of Law. The Faculty of Law may grant exemptions from these time limits on grounds of illness or other circumstances outside of a student's control.

A student must have completed a BA in Law at the Faculty of Law of the University of Iceland to commence postgraduate study in law for a Master's degree. The Faculty of Law may permit students who have completed an equivalent degree from another university to commence postgraduate study at the Faculty for a Master's degree.

Before the end of each calendar year, the Faculty of Law shall decide in which postgraduate subjects teaching shall be offered in the coming academic year, with a minimum of 10 subjects to be offered each semester.

Postgraduate students shall choose the subject field for their theses or other final projects. [...]2 A student must select a Faculty member of teaching staff as thesis supervisor, subject to the approval of the member of teaching staff and the Faculty of Law. A student must sit an examination on the subject of his or her thesis or final project, and performance shall be taken into consideration when grading the thesis or final project. Instead of an examination, a student may be given the option of publicly presenting the subject of the thesis or final project. A student may not complete a thesis or other final project without having previously passed examinations in subjects comprising a total of at least 70 credits. The Faculty of Law shall set rules on the requirements for a thesis or other final project, their credit value and the role of the supervisor.

The Faculty of Law shall determine the arrangements for examinations in postgraduate study; the Faculty may, for instance, decide that midterm examinations are to be held in individual subjects. The Faculty may also decide that essays or other academic work are to replace an examination in a given subject, either in whole or in part. Students are not permitted to sit the same examination in a postgraduate subject more than twice. The provisions of Article 56 of this Regulation shall apply concerning makeup examinations.

To pass examinations in postgraduate study in law, students must achieve a minimum grade of 6.0 in each subject, and also for the Master's thesis (or other final project). The final grade for the Master's in Law shall be calculated as the weighted mean of grades received in individual postgraduate subjects.

The Faculty of Law may assess study undertaken at other University faculties or other universities as part of a postgraduate programme, to a maximum of 60 credit units. Study undertaken at other University faculties or other universities must, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, be sufficiently related to law that it can properly be assessed as a part of legal studies. The Faculty of Law may, furthermore, assess an internship, with an enterprise or institution recognised by the Faculty of Law under rules set by the Faculty, as part of postgraduate study, to a maximum of 6 credit units. Participation in an international or Nordic moot court competition may take the place of an internship, either in part or in full.

A student must have completed a Master's in Law no later than in the calendar year when four years have elapsed since enrolling in postgraduate study at the Faculty of Law. The Faculty of Law may grant exemptions from this time limit on grounds of illness or other circumstances outside of a student's control.

The School of Social Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Law, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in Master's or doctoral study at the Faculty, should there be cause to do so. The University Council’s decision shall be announced before the beginning of the academic year to which it applies. Upon receiving the recommendation of the Faculty, the University Council shall establish rules on the admissions process; these rules shall be published in the course catalogue each year.

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 970/2009.
2Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 629/2013.

FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Article 92.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Political Science shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BA in Political Science.
  2. MA in Political Science.
  3. MA in International Affairs.
  4. MA in European Studies.
  5. MA in Gender Studies.
  6. [MA in West-Nordic Studies: governance and sustainability.]3
  7. [MA in Journalism and Mass Communication.]4
  8. [MA in Media and Communication Studies.]5
  9. [MA in Comparative Politics.]6
  10. MPA in Public Administration.
  11. Doctorate in Political Science and Gender Studies.]1

The Faculty shall also provide teaching for the Master's in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.

The Faculty of Political Science shall set further rules concerning study, which shall appear in the course catalogue.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

Subjects defined as major subjects may also be offered as minor subjects, as may other political science subjects, as further determined by the Faculty.

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Political Science and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation. Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

A BA degree shall require at least 180 credits: 120 credits in a major subject and 60 in a minor subject or in additional courses in the major subject.

An MA degree shall, as a rule, require 120 credits following the completion of a BA degree. Such study may be arranged as a research-based programme, with a final project of at least 30 credits.

The Faculty may also arrange doctoral study programmes of at least 180 credits in conformity with the provisions of this Regulation.

The academic title of Master of Public Administration (MPA) shall be awarded to students completing the 120-credit Master’s in Public Administration, following the completion of a BA degree. An MPA programme involves theoretical study aimed at preparing administrative scientists for work in public administration or further study and research in this field. In addition to the theoretical component, students are required to complete vocational training in accordance with more detailed rules set by the Faculty.

The MA in International Affairs is a 120-credit practical and theoretical programme, intended to train students for the labour market and research work in the various fields of international affairs.

The MA in Gender Studies is a 120-credit programme. The programme is intended to give students the theoretical, practical and methodological knowledge to address gender-related subjects and to prepare them for research in the field.

The Diploma in Public Administration is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards an MPA in Public Administration.

The Diploma in International Affairs is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in International Affairs.

The Diploma in Applied Gender Studies is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Gender Studies.

[The Diploma in Small State Studies: Small States in Europe is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's degree, on the condition that admission requirements are met.]6

The MA in European Studies is an independent 120-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree.

The Diploma in European Studies is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's degree, on the condition that admission requirements are met.]1

[The Diploma in Media and Communication Studies is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA degree or an equivalent university degree. This programme may be evaluated towards a Master's in Media and Communication Studies.]5

[The Diploma in Crisis Management is an independent 30-credit programme, following the completion of a BA/BS degree or an equivalent university degree.]2

Students may be admitted to specially organised postgraduate and supplementary study programmes every other year.

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 152/2010.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 285/2012.
3Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1233/2013.
4Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.
5Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 21/2015.
6Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 223/2015.

Article 93.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BA programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

The same course may comprise part of more than one major or minor subject, but it may only be included once in the total number of credits completed by a student.

A student may take a minor subject in another faculty, having received the approval of the Faculty of Political Science and the faculty offering the subject in question.

The Faculty may determine that a student may not enrol in a course without having previously acquired the right to take the examination, or having passed examinations in specific courses. Requirements may also be made regarding academic performance in order to proceed from one year to the next.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Examinations may be written and/or oral. Teaching staff may, with the approval of the Faculty, assess essays, work assignments and practical exercises as part of an examination. If there are two or more examination components in a course, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of a member of teaching staff, require that students achieve a specific minimum grade in each of the components. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The School of Social Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Political Science, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in certain courses or subjects, should there be cause to do so. In such cases, rules concerning the process of student selection shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Political Science.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (FACULTY OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION)
Article 94. Subjects, degrees and credits

The School of Business shall provide teaching for the following:

BS in Business Administration.
[M.Fin. in Finance, in cooperation with the Faculty of Economics.]3
MS in Business Administration.
MS in Business Finance.
MS in Human Resource Management.
MS in Marketing and International Business.
[MS in Innovation and Entrepreneurship.]1
[MS in Project Management.]2
MS in Strategic Management.
MA in Tax Law and Accounting.
M.Acc in Accounting and Auditing.
Ph.D in Business Administration.

The Faculty shall also provide teaching for the Master's in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

Study shall be assessed in credit units, with one year’s study comprising 60 credit units. A BS degree shall require 180 credits. An MS/MA degree shall require at least 90 credits. More detailed rules on MS/MA and M.Acc programmes than those outlined in this Chapter shall be approved by the University Council, cf. the provisions of Articles 66 and 69 of this Regulation.

The Faculty may arrange undergraduate programmes consisting of 60 or 120 credits, which shall confer with a diploma.

The structure of BS and BA programmes is based on three years or six semesters of study. BS and BA programmes shall be offered, on which the Faculty shall establish further rules.

[The M.Fin. programme in Finance (Master of Finance) is a 90 credits qualification at Master´s level (Cycle 2.1), offered by the Faculty of Business Administration in cooperation with the Faculty of Economics. The structure of the programme is based on three semesters of study, consiting exclusively of participation in courses. The collaborating faculties shall set further rules on admission and stydy requirements.]3

The structure of MS programmes is based on three semesters of study. An MS programme shall consist of at least 90 credits: 60 credits from courses and a 30-credit thesis. Students wishing to complete a 120-credit MS shall have the opportunity to submit a 60-credit thesis, or may seek permission to complete 90 credits from courses. The Faculty shall set more detailed rules on admission requirements, study programmes and study requirements.

The structure of the MA in Tax Law and Accounting is based on four semesters of study. The programme shall consist of at least 90 credits: 72 credits from courses and an 18-credit thesis. The programme is organised in collaboration with the Faculty of Law.

The structure of the M.Acc programme is based on four semesters of study. The programme shall consist of at least 90 credits. The Faculty shall set more detailed rules on admission requirements and study requirements.

Students shall choose their study programmes and electives and may, subject to the approval of the Faculty, choose electives from other faculties.

The subject of a student’s thesis shall be chosen in consultation with at least one lecturer, senior lecturer or professor at the Faculty. A BS thesis shall be assessed as 6-12 credits. An MS/MA thesis shall be assessed as 30 or 60 credits. The Faculty shall set further rules concerning weighting of theses, their composition and submission. Students may be examined orally on the subjects of their theses and performance assessed as part of the thesis grade. The supervisor and an external examiner shall award the grade for an MS/MA thesis.

The Faculty may arrange studies for students registered in other faculties at the University of Iceland.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 315/2014.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1087/2015.
3Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 161/2016.

Article 95.  Student progression, examinations, minimum grades and maximum length of study

The School of Business shall determine the prerequisites which shall apply regarding the admission of students to specific courses. Teaching staff may, with the approval of the Faculty, assess essays and practical exercises as part of an examination, and require minimum grades for each assessment in a subject. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue. Work carried out by students for enterprises or institutes may be assessed as equivalent to essays and practical work in specific subjects, as may work on certain projects outside the Faculty. The Faculty may hold practical courses outside of normal teaching hours.

Examinations shall be written unless the Faculty determines otherwise. Examinations shall be held at the conclusion of courses. Resit examinations are to be held following the general examination periods in December and May.

The minimum passing grade required in subjects within the School of Business shall be 5.0 unless otherwise stipulated. The Faculty may set higher minimum grade requirements in individual subjects.

To graduate from the School of Business, a student must achieve an average grade of 6.0.

Students studying for an MS/MA must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. Students studying for a BS must have completed the programme no later than five years after enrolling. The Faculty may grant exceptions to these time limits should illness or other valid reasons so warrant.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the School of Business. A student cannot graduate with a degree from the Faculty without having completed at least 60 credits within the Faculty.

Article 96.  [MBA programme]1

The School of Business (Faculty of Business Administration) may, with the approval of the University Council, confer the degree of MBA, upon the completion of 90 credits of continuing education study offered by the Faculty, provided this complies with the provisions of Article 64 of this Regulation on continuing education offered by faculties.

For admission to the MBA programme, a student must have completed a BA, BS or equivalent university degree and, as a rule, have three years of employment experience.

The School of Business shall establish more detailed rules on admission requirements, study programmes and study requirements in resolutions on the programme, to be approved by the University Council.

[...]1

1Amended by Article 8 of Regulation no. 1143/2011.

CHAPTER XI
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES

The faculties of the School of Health Sciences are: the Faculty of Nursing; the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; the Faculty of Medicine; the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition; the Faculty of Psychology; and the Faculty of Odontology.

Faculties shall work in close cooperation with each other in order to make optimal use of human and financial resources, facilities, instruments and equipment in the interests of furthering and diversifying education and research.

The School of Health Sciences and its faculties shall likewise encourage close collaboration with University central administration and other University schools and faculties.

The provisions of Chapter II of this Regulation shall apply concerning school and faculty administration and other items pertaining to these same rules. Admission requirements for individual faculties and study programmes shall be as provided for in rules established by the University Council, cf. Article 47 of this Regulation. The University Council shall also establish rules on University institutes and Master’s and doctoral programmes for each faculty.

FACULTY OF NURSING
Article 97  [Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Nursing shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BS in Nursing.
  2. Candidate degree in Midwifery (cand. obst.).
  3. Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing.
  4. Master's in Nursing.
  5. Master's in Midwifery.
  6. Doctorate in Nursing and Midwifery in fields of study where the necessary facilities are available.
  7. Master’s or doctorate in Public Health Sciences and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.

The Faculty of Nursing shall provide teaching in nursing and midwifery. Midwifery is organised as a department, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The general undergraduate nursing programme shall consist of four years of study, for a total of 240 credits, and confer a BS degree. The Faculty may offer nurses a specially designed undergraduate programme for a BS degree.

Midwifery consists of two years of academic study and vocational training, for a total of 120 credits, following the completion of a BS in Nursing. The academic title of Candidatus Obstetriciorum (cand. obst.) shall be awarded to students completing the Candidate degree in Midwifery from the Faculty of Nursing.

The Master’s in Midwifery is a 55-credit programme, following the completion of a Candidate degree in Midwifery from the Faculty of Nursing.

[The Postgraduate Diploma in Sexology is a 30-credit programme, following the completion of a bachelor's degree. [The programme is organised jointly by two University faculties: the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies and the Faculty of Nursing, in accordance with a special agreement between these faculties.]3 The board of study has academic responsibility for the programme, overseen by the Faculty of Nursing.]2

The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing is a [30.]4 to 90-credit programme, following the completion of a BS in Nursing or an equivalent university degree. The Faculty shall set further rules on postgraduate diplomas, to be approved by the University Council.

The Master’s in Nursing is a 120-credit programme, with a full year of study consisting of 60 credits. The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's study, to be approved by the University Council, cf. the provisions of Articles 66 and 69 of this Regulation.

[A doctorate in the Faculty of Nursing shall consist of 180 credits of research-based study following the completion of a Master’s degree.]5

The Faculty is responsible for providing supplementary and continuing education for nurses, as budgetary considerations and other circumstances allow.]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 497/2011.
2Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 74/2013.
3Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 223/2015.
4Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 288/2016.
5Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1015/2016.

Article 98  Student progression, assessment, grades and maximum length of study

In order to advance from one year of undergraduate study in nursing to the next, a student may have no more than one incomplete examination from the previous year’s curriculum and no incomplete examinations from earlier years of study. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these rules, in exceptional circumstances.

The Faculty shall determine study programmes and subjects, their division into courses and weighting, after receiving the proposals of nursing and midwifery study committees; this shall be specified in the course catalogue. All changes to the course catalogue must be reported no later than the beginning of the academic year.

[...]1

Examinations shall, as a rule, be written. Examinations may be oral or practical as determined by the Faculty.

If there are two or more examination components for a course, the faculty meeting may, at the recommendation of a member of staff, determine that a student not be considered to have passed the examination without having achieved the minimum grade for the entire course in each of the specific examination components. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

A student’s performance in practical work shall be assessed by the member of teaching staff responsible for it. Grades for practical work shall not count towards the final grade for a course. Teaching staff may do so, however, with the approval of the Faculty; such a decision must be specified in the course catalogue.

To receive a BS in Nursing, a student must have received a minimum grade of:

6.0 in nursing courses, as further determined by the Faculty.
5.0 in other courses.

Students studying for a BS in Nursing must have completed the programme no later than six years after enrolling. Students studying for a Master's programme at the Faculty or a Candidate degree in Midwifery must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. The Faculty may grant exceptions to these time limits should illness or other valid reasons so warrant.

Study in midwifery may not be taken on a part-time basis. The minimum grade is 6.0 in all components of assessment in each course. Each course is a necessary prerequisite for the next. The Faculty shall set more detailed rules on the study programme. Admission requirements for midwifery are a degree in nursing and a licence to practice nursing in Iceland. Nurses who have not completed a BS in Nursing must complete preparatory study, as further determined by the Faculty, before they may commence study in midwifery.

Enrolment in midwifery shall be based on a specific number of students each year, as determined by the University Council upon having received a reasoned proposal from the School of Health Sciences on behalf of the Faculty. Should there be more applicants than the number determined by the University Council, the study committee for midwifery shall examine the applications and make a decision on the selection of students in accordance with detailed rules set by the University Council, having received suggestions from the Faculty, which shall be published in the course catalogue.

The School of Health Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students enrolling in nursing, in keeping with the number of clinical study placements at health care institutions. The University Council’s decision shall be announced before the beginning of the academic year to which it applies.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Nursing.

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 21/2015.

FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Article 99  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BS in Pharmacy.
  2. MS in Pharmacy (equivalent to cand.pharm degree for professional certification in pharmacy).
  3. MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences.
  4. MS in Clinical Pharmacy.
  5. Doctorate in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.
  6. Master’s or doctorate in Public Health Sciences and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.]1

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty shall set further rules on the BS in Pharmacy.

A student must have completed a BA in Pharmacy at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the University of Iceland to commence postgraduate study in pharmacy for a Master's degree. The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences may permit students who have completed an equivalent qualification to commence postgraduate study in pharmacy at the Faculty for a Master's degree.

Vocational training for students in the MS in Pharmacy shall take place in accordance with rules set by the Faculty.

Persons completing a Master’s in Pharmacy (equivalent to cand.pharm. degree) and vocational training can apply for professional certification as pharmacists, on the condition that they meet the requirements of Article 3 of the Pharmacists Act no. 35/1978, with subsequent amendments.

The Faculty shall provide teaching and training for an MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences, following completion of a BS or other university degree that the Faculty deems to provide appropriate preparation for the study programme.

The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences shall set further rules on the Master’s programmes in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and on doctoral studies, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

All changes to the weighting of courses shall be stated in the course catalogue or otherwise announced no later than at the beginning of the academic year.

Courses shall be assessed in credit units; full-time study, as a rule, is considered to be 60 credits per academic year. Study for a BS degree shall consist of 180 credits and postgraduate study for an MS in Pharmacy or Pharmaceutical Sciences shall consist of 120 credits. [Postgraduate study for an MS in Clinical Pharmacy shall consist of 90 credits.]1 The weighting of a course for the overall grade shall correspond to its credit value. Study for a doctorate shall consist of 180 credits, following the completion of a Master’s degree, cf. special rules pertaining to this.

Teaching in each course shall be arranged such that a student covers all of the principal aspects of the subject before taking an examination.

The Faculty is responsible for providing continuing education for pharmacists, as budgetary considerations and other circumstances allow.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1156/2015.

Article 100  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

A student shall complete at least 52 credits of first-year study before beginning second-year study or any individual components thereof. After the second year of study, the student must have completed all first-year examinations and examinations in at least 40 credits of second-year study in order to commence third-year study.

Makeup examinations in subjects in which there are competitive examinations (cf. paragraph 8) shall be held, if necessary, no later than four weeks after the competitive examinations, and earlier if possible.

Examinations shall, as a rule, be written, but may also be oral or practical, as determined by the Faculty.

In order to receive a BS or MS in Pharmacy, a student must receive a minimum grade of 5.0 in each course studied, as well as in all components of individual courses. The Faculty shall determine the weighting of each course component in consultation with teaching staff and shall publish an announcement concerning this at the beginning of the semester.

Teaching staff may assess essays, performance in practical exercises and other course work as part of the examination and prescribe a minimum grade for each component.

Students studying for a BS in Pharmacy must have completed the programme no later than five years after enrolling at the Faculty of Pharmacy. Teaching for Master’s programmes in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences shall be arranged such that a student can complete the programme in two years, following the completion of a BS degree. [Teaching for the Master's in Clinical Pharmacy shall be arranged such that the programme can be completed in three years, following the completion of an MS degree.]1 Students studying for a Master’s degree must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. An exemption may be granted to to this time limit on grounds of illness or other circumstances outside of a student's control.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

The School of Health Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, should there be cause to do so. The University Council’s decision shall be announced before the beginning of the academic year to which it applies. The right of a student to continue study is based on performance in competitive examinations held at the end of the first semester of the first year of study, in accordance with more detailed rules set by the Faculty and published in the course catalogue.

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1156/2015.

FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Article 101  [Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Medicine shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. Candidate degree in Medicine.
  2. BS in Medicine.
  3. [BS in Physical Therapy Sciences.]4
  4. BS in Radiography.
  5. BS in Biomedical Science.
  6. [MS in Radiography, Biomedical Science or Physical Therapy.]2
  7. Master's and doctoral degrees in Health Sciences, and Biomedical Sciences. Master’s or doctorate in Public Health Sciences and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available. The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's and doctoral study, in accordance with this Regulation, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The Faculty of Medicine shall provide teaching in medicine, physical therapy, radiography and biomedical science. Physical therapy, radiography and biomedical science are organised as departments, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

All changes to the weighting of courses shall be stated in the course catalogue or otherwise announced no later than at the beginning of the academic year.

Teaching in each subject shall be arranged such that a student covers all of its principal aspects before taking an examination.

[The Candidate degree programme in Medicine consists of 360 credits, including 180 credits leading to a BS in Medicine, the BS in Medicine consists of 180 credits, the BS in Physical Therapy Sciences consists of 180 credits, the BS in Radiography consists of 180 credits and the BS in Biomedical Science consists of 180 credits. Persons completing the Candidate degree in Medicine shall be awarded the degree title Candidatus Medicinae (cand. med.). Persons completing the BS in Medicine shall be awarded the degree title Baccalaureus Scientiarum (BS) in Medicine, persons completing the the BS in Physical Therapy Sciences shall be awarded the degree title Baccalaureus Scientiarum (BS) in Physical Therapy Sciences. Persons completing the 180-credit programme in Radiography or Biomedical Science shall be awarded the degree title Baccalaureus Scientiarum (BS) in Radiography/Biomedical Sciences, depending on the programme of study undertaken. Having completed a BS in Physical Therapy Sciences, a student may enrol in a 120-credit MS programme in Physical Therapy. Having completed a BS in Radiography or Biomedical Science, a student may enrol in a 60-credit programme at the Master’s level, leading to professional recognition, in accordance with more detailed rules.]4

The Faculty of Medicine shall provide teaching and training for Master’s degrees, Magister Scientiarum (MS), in Health Sciences, Biomedical Sciences, [Radiography, Biomedical Science and Physical Therapy.]2 The academic title MS shall be awarded upon the completion of 120 credits of postgraduate study, following the completion of an appropriate university degree. To enrol in a Master’s programme at the Faculty of Medicine, a student must have completed a BS degree at the University of Iceland or other equivalent degree. [To enrol in the MS programme in Physical Therapy, a student must have completed a BS degree in Physical Therapy Sciences.]4

A committee appointed by the Faculty of Medicine shall assist the head of faculty in assessing applications for MS programmes, monitoring study as a whole and guaranteeing consistency. A special supervisory committee, appointed by the Faculty, shall oversee the study of each student in an MS programme. Study shall involve training in scientific methods, and a thesis based on an independent research project. The size of the research project shall be determined in the study schedule; it may range from a minimum of [30]2 credits to a maximum of 90 credits. An MS research project shall conclude with the submission of a thesis and the delivery of a lecture on the project by the student. The thesis and lecture shall be judged by two specialists appointed by the supervisory committee for the task. The student obtains other credits for the MS degree through course participation. The minimum grade required for courses taken as part of an MS programme is 6.0.

The Doctorates in Health Sciences and in Biomedical Science are subject to special rules, [cf. sentence 3, item g, paragraph 1]3 of this Article.]1

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1024/2009.
2Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 138/2014.
3Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.

4Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1015/2016.

Article 102  [Student progression, assessment, grades and maximum length of study

A student must have successfully completed all the examinations for a given year of study before commencing the following year of study.

Examinations shall, as a rule, be written, but may also be oral or practical, as determined by the Faculty.

If there is more than one examination component for a given subject or if examinations are held in the same subject in multiple years of study, a student must receive the stipulated minimum grade for each component of the examination. The Faculty shall determine the weighting of each component of an examination in consultation with teaching staff.

A student’s performance in practical work shall be assessed by the member of teaching staff responsible for it. Teaching staff must submit written reports to the University Student Registration. Four grades shall be given: excellent, good, satisfactory, unsatisfactory. A student receiving the grade unsatisfactory is not considered to have completed the practical work and shall not be entitled to register for the examination. Grades for practical work shall not count towards the final grade. However, it is permissible, with consent from the Faculty, for a numerical grade to be given for practical work and for it to be included as a specific part of the final grade in the subject in question.

The minimum grade required for courses taken as part of an MS programme is 6.0, cf. Article 101.

Teaching for the Candidate degree in Medicine shall be arranged such that study can be completed in six years; the total length of study may not exceed eight years. Teaching for a BS in Medicine shall be arranged such that study can be completed in three years; the total length of study may not exceed four years. A BS in Medicine from the University of Iceland Faculty of Medicine is a condition for further study for a Candidate degree in Medicine. [Teaching for a BS in Physical Therapy Sciences shall be arranged such that study can be completed in three years; the total length of study may not exceed four years. On completion of the BS a student may enrol in the 120-credit MS programme in Physical Therapy, for which the total length of study may not exceed three years.]3 Teaching for a BS in Radiography or Biomedical Sciences shall be arranged such that study can be completed in three years, following which a student may enrol in a study programme at the Master’s level, leading to professional qualification, in accordance with more detailed rules. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these requirements, in exceptional circumstances.

Students in practical study on hospital wards or in research laboratories must attend their instructional seminars.

[The Faculty of Medicine is, in cooperation with health institutions, responsible for providing postgraduate education for qualified physicians and physiotherapists, as budgetary considerations and other circumstances allow.]2 The Faculty shall determine the detailed arrangements for teaching and examinations.

The School of Health Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in Medicine, [Physical Therapy Sciences, Physical Therapy,]3 Radiography, and Biomedical Sciences, should there be cause to do so. The University Council’s decision shall be announced before the beginning of the academic year to which it applies. Upon receiving the recommendations of the Faculty and the School, the University Council shall establish rules on the admissions process; these rules shall be published in the course catalogue each year.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling and transferring from other faculties or between majors within the Faculty of Medicine.]1

1Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1024/2009.
2Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 138/2014.

3Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1015/2016.

FACULTY OF FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION
Article 103  Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition shall provide teaching for the following:

BS in Food Science.
BS in Food Technology.
BS in Nutrition.
MS in Food Science.
MS in Nutrition.
Doctorate in Food Science and Nutrition where the necessary facilities are available. Master’s or doctorate in Public Health Sciences and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available. The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's and doctoral study, in accordance with this Regulation, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The Faculty is divided into two departments (cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation): the Department of Food Science and the Department of Nutrition.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

All changes to the weighting of courses shall be stated in the course catalogue or otherwise announced no later than at the beginning of the academic year.

Courses shall be assessed in credit units; full-time study, as a rule, is considered to be 60 credits per academic year. The structure of BS programmes is based on three years of study, for a total of at least 180 credits.

An MS degree is awarded for the completion of a 120-credit Master’s programme, following the completion of a BS in Food Science or Nutrition or comparable degree and necessary preparation, as per the opinion of the Faculty. An MS in Nutrition represents the basis for the professional designation of certified nutritionist.

Doctorates in Food Science or Nutrition are 180-credit programmes, following the completion of a Master’s degree, subject to special rules, cf. paragraph 2 of this Article.

Article 104.  Student progression, assessment, grades and maximum length of study

A student shall register in a major subject upon commencing study. Students wishing to deviate from the organisation of study provided for in the course catalogue must submit a proposed study schedule to the Faculty for approval. The same shall apply if they wish to alter their original study schedule or lengthen the period of study due to special circumstances. Such matters must have been addressed prior to the start of teaching for the autumn semester.

The Faculty may determine that a student may not enrol in a course without having previously acquired the right to take the examination, or having passed examinations in specific courses.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Practical courses may be held outside of normal teaching hours.

Students must successfully complete examinations in all first-year courses before the end of their second year of study and successfully complete all second-year examinations before the end of their third year of study; anyone failing to do so loses the right to continued study. In order to receive a BS degree, a student must have received a minimum grade of 5.0 in each course studied. In order to receive a MS degree, a student must have received a minimum grade of 6.0 in each course studied.

A student in a BS programme must also reach a certain performance in examinations and accumulate the following number of credits:  after the first year of study, 40 credits; after the second year, 90 credits; after the third year, 140 credits; after the fourth year, 180 credits. Teaching for Master’s programmes shall be arranged such that a student can complete the programme in two years, following the completion of a BS degree. Students studying for a Master’s degree must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling.

The Faculty may make exceptions to the provisions of paragraphs 5 and 6 on time limits and student progression, provided that a student has not neglected his or her studies and appears likely to complete the programme.

Resit examinations are to be held following the general examination periods in December and May, cf. Articles 56 and 57 of this Regulation.

In calculating grades, a student’s performance on tests and assignments outside of the prescribed examination period may be taken into account and a special grade be awarded for such, the term grade. The Faculty shall, at the recommendation of teaching staff, determine the weighting of term grades, and this shall be specified in the course catalogue. When publishing grades, the examination grade and term grade shall also be shown separately. In an examination subject for which a term grade is given, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of teaching staff, stipulate that for either grade, a student shall be considered to have failed the examination if this grade is lower than the minimum grade required for the examination subject as a whole. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition.

The School of Health Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in nutrition, should there be cause to do so. The University Council’s decision shall be announced before the beginning of the academic year to which it applies. Upon receiving the recommendations of the Faculty and the School, the University Council shall establish rules on the admissions process; these rules shall be published in the course catalogue each year.

FACULTY OF PSYCHOLOGY
Article 105.  [Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Psychology shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BS in Psychology
  2. Candidate degree in Psychology (cand. psych.).
  3. MS in Psychology
  4. [MS in Applied Psychology.]3
  5. Doctorate in Psychology where the necessary facilities are available. Master’s or doctorate in Public Health Sciences and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available. The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's and doctoral study, in accordance with this Regulation, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

All changes to the weighting of courses shall be stated in the course catalogue or otherwise announced no later than at the beginning of the academic year.

Courses shall be assessed in credit units; full-time study, as a rule, is considered to be 60 credits per academic year. The structure of BS programmes is based on three years of study, for a total of at least 180 credits. Students studying for a BS in Psychology may also choose to complete a 120-credit major in psychology and a 60-credit minor in a subject taught at another faculty, on the condition that of the Faculty of Psychology and the other faculty in question approve the minor.

[The MS in Psychology is an individual 120-credit Master’s programme, following the completion of a BS in Psychology.]3

[The MS in Applied Psychology is a 120-credit Master’s programme, following the completion of a BS in Psychology. The programme is practical and theoretical with a field relation, providing students with training in applying their knowledge of psychology in different areas. The programme also serves as preparation for doctoral studies. Students shall select one of three specialisations.]3

The Candidate degree in Psychology (cand. psych.) is a 120-credit programme, following the completion of a BS in Psychology. The programme is comprised of theoretical study and vocational training and covers clinical adult psychology, clinical child psychology and educational and school psychology. The programme is intended to provide graduates with the legal right to bear the title of psychologist. Vocational training for students in the Candidate degree programme shall take place in accordance with rules set by the Faculty. In order to graduate with a Candidate degree in Psychology, the weighted average grade for all graded courses shall be at least 7.0.

Doctorates in Psychology are 180-credit programmes, following the completion of a Master’s degree, subject to special rules, [cf. sentence 3, item e. paragraph 1 of this Article.]2]1

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 497/2011.
2Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.
3Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1015/2016.

Article 106.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BS programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BS degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for the 120-credit MS or Candidate degrees shall be arranged such that a student can complete the programme in two years.

The same course may comprise part of more than one major or minor subject, but it may only be included once in the total number of credits completed by a student.

A student in a BS programme may take a minor subject in another faculty, having received the approval of the Faculty of Psychology and the faculty offering the subject in question.

The Faculty may determine that a student may not enrol in a course without having previously acquired the right to take the examination, or having passed examinations in specific courses. Requirements may also be made regarding academic performance in order to proceed from one year to the next. This shall be stated in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Examinations may be written and/or oral. Teaching staff may, with the approval of the Faculty, assess essays, work assignments and practical exercises as part of an examination. If there are two or more examination components in a course, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of a member of teaching staff, require that students achieve a specific minimum grade in each of the components. Such a decision shall be stated in the course catalogue or in the study schedule submitted at the beginning of a course.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Psychology.

The School of Health Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Psychology, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in the Candidate programme in Psychology [and MS programme in Applied Psychology,]1 should there be cause to do so. The University Council’s decision shall be announced before the beginning of the academic year to which it applies. Upon receiving the recommendations of the Faculty and the School, the University Council shall establish rules on the admissions process; these rules shall be published in the course catalogue each year.

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 1015/2016.

FACULTY OF ODONTOLOGY
Article 107.  Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Odontology shall provide teaching in dental and oral sciences as follows:

Candidate degree in Odontology.
BS in Dental Technology.
Master's and doctoral degrees in dental and oral sciences in fields of study where the necessary facilities are available. Master’s or doctorate in Public Health Sciences and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available. The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's and doctoral study, in accordance with this Regulation, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

Teaching in odontology and dental technology shall address the subjects of current concern within the academic field. The field of odontology shall encompass everything connected with the construction and functions of the human masticatory system.

Dental technology is organised as a department, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty shall provide health authorities with information on dental health and is a leader in matters of dental health advice and public education. Furthermore, the Faculty shall provide dental services to the public in connection with the teaching provided by the Faculty, and specialist services in accordance with the current agreement between the University of Iceland and health care authorities.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

All changes to the weighting of courses shall be stated in the course catalogue or otherwise announced no later than at the beginning of the academic year.

Teaching in each subject shall be arranged such that a student covers all of its principal aspects before taking an examination.

The Candidate programme in Odontology consists of 360 credits and the BS in Dental Technology consists of 180 credits. Dental technology can only be studied as a major subject. Students studying for a Candidate degree must have completed the programme no later than six years after commencing their second year of study. The Faculty may grant exceptions to these time limits should illness or other valid reasons so warrant.

Persons completing the Candidate degree at the Faculty of Odontology shall be awarded the degree title Candidatus Odontologiae (cand.odont.). Persons completing the BS in Dental Technology shall be awarded the degree title Baccalaureus Scientiarum (BS) in Dental Technology.

The Faculty of Odontology may offer teaching and training for MS degrees in academic fields within the Faculty. The academic title MS shall be awarded upon the completion of 120 credits of postgraduate study, following the completion of an appropriate university degree. Admission shall be open to persons who have completed a Candidate degree in Odontology or other academic degree that the Faculty deems to provide appropriate preparation for the study programme. A research-based study committee within the School of Health Sciences shall, along with representatives nominated by the Faculty of Odontology, oversee Master's study in order to guarantee quality and consistency.

Master's study shall involve training in scientific methods, and a thesis based on an independent research project. [The size of the research project shall be 60 credits.]1 An MS research project shall conclude with the submission of a thesis and the delivery of a lecture on the project by the student. The thesis and lecture shall be judged by two specialists appointed by the supervisory committee for the task. The student obtains other credits for the MS degree through course participation. The minimum grade required for courses taken as part of an MS programme is 6.0.

Special rules, set by the Faculty and approved by the University Council, shall apply concerning doctoral degrees. A research-based study committee within the School of Health Sciences shall, along with representatives nominated by the Faculty of Odontology, oversee doctoral study in order to guarantee quality and consistency.

The Faculty of Odontology is responsible for the postgraduate education of dentists, as budgetary considerations and other circumstances allow. The Faculty shall determine the detailed arrangements for teaching and examinations.

1Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.

Article 108.  Student progression, assessment, grades and maximum length of study

A student must have successfully completed all the examinations for a given year of study before commencing the following year of study.

Examinations shall be written, oral or practical, as determined by the Faculty.

If there is more than one examination component for a given subject or if examinations are held in the same subject in multiple years of study, a student must receive the stipulated minimum grade for each component of the examination. The Faculty shall determine the weighting of each component of an examination in consultation with teaching staff. The weighting of each component of an examination in the total grade for a subject shall be announced before the start of the academic year.

A student’s performance in practical work shall be assessed by the member of teaching staff responsible for it. Teaching staff must submit written reports to the University Student Registration. Four grades shall be given: excellent, good, satisfactory, unsatisfactory. A student receiving the grade unsatisfactory is not considered to have completed the practical work and shall not be entitled to register for the examination. Numerical grades shall be given for preclinical and clinical studies; these shall be included as a specific part of the final grade in the subject in question.

Teaching in odontology shall be arranged such that study can be completed in six years, and teaching in dental technology such that study can be completed in three years. The total length of study for students in odontology may not exceed eight years, and the total length of study for students in dental technology may not exceed four years. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these requirements, in exceptional circumstances.

The School of Health Sciences shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Odontology, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students, should there be cause to do so. The University Council’s decision shall be announced before the beginning of the academic year to which it applies. Upon receiving the recommendations of the Faculty and the School, the University Council shall establish rules on the admissions process; these rules shall be published in the course catalogue each year.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Odontology.
 

CHAPTER XII
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES

The faculties of the School of Humanties are: [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures;]1 the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies; the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies; and the Faculty of History and Philosophy.

Faculties shall work in close cooperation with each other in order to make optimal use of human and financial resources, facilities, instruments and equipment in the interests of furthering and diversifying education and research.

The School of Humanities and its faculties shall likewise encourage close collaboration with University central administration and other University schools and faculties.

The provisions of Chapter II of this Regulation shall apply concerning school and faculty administration and other items pertaining to these same rules. Admission requirements for individual faculties and study programmes shall be as provided for in rules established by the University Council, cf. Article 47 of this Regulation. The University Council shall also establish rules on University institutes and Master’s and doctoral programmes for each faculty.

[FACULTY OF LANGUAGES AND CULTURES]1

1Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 109.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[[The Faculty of Languages and Cultures]6 shall provide teaching in the following:

  1. BA in: Chinese Studies, Danish,  East-Asian Studies, English, Finnish, French Studies, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Norwegian, Russian, Spanish and Swedish. Teaching in a minor subject may also be offered, as further determined by the Faculty.
  2. MA in: Applied Studies in German in Tourism and Communication; Danish; English; French Studies; Literature, Culture and Media; German; [Inter-American Studies;]3 Nordic Studies and Spanish. MA in: Danish Teaching, English Teaching, French Teaching, German Teaching, Spanish Teaching. MA in: Applied Translation Studies, Conference Interpreting, [Second Language Studies]5 and Translation Studies in collaboration with the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies, cf. paragraph 1, Article 113. [Also MA in: European Languages, History and Culture in collaboration with the Faculty of History and Philosophy, cf. paragraph 1, Article 115.]2
  3. Doctorate in: those fields for which the Faculty deems the necessary facilities and expertise to be available.]1

The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's and doctoral study, in accordance with this Regulation, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

[[The Faculty of Languages and Cultures]6 comprises the following departments, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation: English; German, Nordic Languages, Chinese and Russian; Japanese and Romance Languages]1

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty shall make further decisions regarding the division of subjects into courses and their weighting in credits, the order in which courses shall be taken, and which courses are mandatory. If specific difficulties arise in the teaching of a particular subject, the Faculty may decide to discontinue teaching the subject.

The Faculty may run short practical courses at the undergraduate level, cf. the provisions of Article 55 of this Regulation. The Faculty may also offer supplementary study following the completion of a qualifying university degree. In addition to teaching for the degrees listed above, the Faculty may organise various courses within the Faculty or in association with other faculties.

A BA degree shall require at least 180 credits. A student shall select a major from the fields of study listed in paragraph 1, and complete at least 120 credits in that field. A student must also complete either 60 additional credits in the major or 60 credits in a minor chosen from other subjects within the School of Humanities. The final thesis shall account for at least 10 credits. A student may also complete a BA with two majors by completing at least 120 credits, including a thesis, in each field of study. A student may, with the Faculty’s permission, take a minor subject or individual courses in another faculty.

[On completion of a BA, a student may apply to begin a Master’s programme in the major subject of the BA.]6 The student is required to have completed the BA with a first class grade. Under special circumstances, a student may be granted an exemption from the minimum grade requirement. Students not satisfying the aforementioned requirements may apply to begin a Master’s degree with the Faculty, on the condition of having previously completed an equivalent degree and fulfilling other requirements stipulated by the Faculty. Details of these requirements are stipulated in the rules for organisation of study for individual programmes within the Faculty.

An MA degree shall, as a rule, require at least 120 credits. The MA thesis shall have a minimum credit value of 30 credits and a maximum of 60 credits. A student shall select an MA thesis topic in conformity with Faculty rules. Further guidelines concerning the proportion of courses in a subject, as well as the weighting of essays and individual courses, shall be found in the rules for organisation of study approved by the Faculty for each programme.

The Faculty shall set any further rules on Master's study, to be approved by the University council, cf. paragraph 5. These rules may provide for programmes run by the Faculty jointly with other faculties or universities, or programmes requiring at least 90 credits for a Master’s degree. For such study programmes run jointly by the Faculty with other faculties or universities, a specialist council or board of study may be entrusted with the role otherwise held by the Faculty. Diploma studies at the Master’s level (for 30 or 60 credits) may also be offered. Such studies may be counted towards a Master’s degree in accordance with detailed provisions in the rules for organisation of study.

Upon completion of an MA from [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures]6 with a first class grade, a student may apply for admission to doctoral study within the Faculty. Upon completion of a Master’s degree or other equivalent degree from another University of Iceland faculty or other universities recognised by the Faculty, with the equivalent of a first class grade, a student may apply for admission to doctoral study within  [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.]6 A student’s qualifications shall be evaluated with respect to the major subject of the doctorate. A student will be required to meet study requirements ensuring adequate preparation to undertake doctoral studies in the respective field.

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits following the completion of a Master's degree. A student may take up to 240 credits as part of a doctorate on completion of a Master’s degree if there are academic grounds for this. At the commencement of doctoral studies, the Faculty’s postgraduate study committee shall, in consultation with the student, assign the student a supervisor in the relevant field. The student shall plan a schedule for completing the general component of the doctorate in consultation with a supervisor, in accordance with detailed rules for organisation of study set by the Faculty for each subject. The postgraduate study committee shall confirm the study schedule; student progression shall be evaluated by means deemed satisfactory by the committee.

A doctoral student shall select a research topic in consultation with the supervisor and draw up a schedule describing how the project shall be completed. This schedule shall be submitted to the Faculty’s postgraduate study committee for approval. If the committee approves the schedule, research may commence under the supervisor’s direction. The doctoral student shall conclude the research project by writing a comprehensive doctoral thesis, under the supervisor’s direction. The thesis must be judged and defended in accordance with University regulation on doctoral theses and doctoral defences.

The Faculty shall set any further rules on doctoral study, to be approved by the University council, [cf. paragraph 2.]4

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 497/2011.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 1305/2011.
3Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 74/2013.
4Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.
5Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1087/2015.

6Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 110.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BA degree in [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures]1 shall be arranged such that a student can complete the programme within three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA degree is eight semesters (four years) from the time of registration in the Faculty. Normal student progression, however, is based on the completion, each academic year, of at least three-fourths of the credit total defined in Article 53 as full-time study. The Faculty may set further requirements concerning student progressions in individual subjects.

[Teaching for Master's degree shall be arranged such that a full-time student can complete the programme within two years, following completion of a BA degree.]1 Students studying full-time for a Master's degree must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. Each academic year, part-time students must complete at least half of the credits required for full-time study, as per Article 53, and must complete the programme no later than four years after enrolling.

The Faculty may grant a student an extension of up to one year beyond the time limits set forth in paragraphs 1 and 2, or authorise a break from study, if circumstances so warrant. Otherwise, on failing to complete the programme within prescribed time limits, the student shall forfeit the right to continue study at the Faculty. A student may apply for re-admission and to have previously completed courses evaluated for credit.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.]1

Assessment may involve written and/or oral examinations, practical exercises, assignments or essays. If there are two or more examination components for a course, a department may, at the recommendation of a member of staff, determine that a student not be considered to have passed the examination without having achieved the minimum grade for the entire course in each of the specific examination components. Such a decision shall be announced no later than by the beginning of the course.

The minimum passing grade required in subjects within [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures]1 is 5.0. The Faculty may set higher minimum grade requirements in individual subjects. In order to graduate from [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures,]1 a student must achieve a minimum average grade of 6.0.

In order to graduate with a degree from [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures,]1 at least half of the total credits for a programme must have been completed within the Faculty.

1Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

FACULTY OF THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Article 111.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BA in Theology.
  2. BA in Religious Studies.
  3. BA in Theology - Deacon Studies.
  4. [Master's degrees: Professional Certification in Theology (mag. theol.), MA in Theology (only for those who have completed a cand. theol. degree), MA in Religious Studies and MA for Teaching Certification in Christian Studies and Religious Studies.]2
  5. Doctorate in Theology in those fields for which the Faculty deems the necessary facilities and expertise to be available.]1

The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's and doctoral study, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The Faculty may also offer deacon studies as a supplementary study programme on completion of undergraduate studies, a BA or BS.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

Fields of study within the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies are:  Old Testament studies, New Testament studies, theology, theological ethics, church history, religious studies and clerical theology.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

The Faculty may stipulate minimum prerequisites for participation in specific courses. The Faculty shall set rules on cooperative groups between teaching staff, selection of subject material and organisation of academic work in the various subjects.

The Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies may require students studying for professional certification or as deacons to take part in practical study within institutions of the Church of Iceland or other religious organisations as appropriate, or in healthcare institutions. The Faculty shall set further rules concerning practical study in the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies.

A BA degree shall require at least 180 credits. In their first year, all students shall complete core subjects providing an introduction to all fields of theology. On completion of the core programme, students may chose between studying for a BA in Theology, BA in Religious Studies or BA in Deacon Studies.

The curriculum for the BA in Theology is set by the Faculty.

The BA in Religious Studies is undertaken in association with other faculties of the University of Iceland and under the management of a special board of study.

The curriculum for the BA in Deacon Studies is set by the Faculty.

A student who has completed at least 120 credits in theology of the 180 credits required for the BA degree, together with an additional 60 credits in another subject approved by the Faculty, may graduate with a BA from the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies.

A person who has completed a university degree in the field of education, nursing,
psychology or social work may enrol in the 60-credit Deacon Studies programme. This programme shall be arranged in accordance with a curriculum set by the Faculty. The Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies shall confer a special qualification for completion of this study programme. Collaboration may be organised with other faculties of the University of Iceland, other universities or the Church of Iceland, concerning individual components of deacon studies, whether for the 60-credit supplementary study programme or the 180-credit BA in Deacon Studies.

A Master’s degree from the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies requires at least 120 credits following completion of a BA degree.

On completion of a BA in Theology, a student may choose to study for Professional Certification in Theology, (mag. theol.), if the composition of study complies with the Faculty’s curriculum in this regard; an MA in Theology or Religious Studies; or a programme towards Teaching Certification.[...]5

Students not satisfying the aforementioned requirements may apply to begin a Master’s degree with the Faculty, on the condition of having previously completed an equivalent degree and fulfilling other requirements stipulated by the Faculty.

Upon completion of a Master's degree from the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies with a first class grade, a student may apply for admission to doctoral study within the Faculty. Upon completion of a Master’s degree or other equivalent degree from another University of Iceland faculty or other universities recognised by the Faculty, with the equivalent of a first class grade, a student may apply for admission to doctoral study within the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies. A student’s qualifications shall be evaluated with respect to the major subject of the doctorate. A student will be required to meet more extensive study requirements than those students who have completed a Master's degree within the Faculty.

[A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits following the completion of a Master's degree. A student may take up to 240 credits as part of a doctorate following completion of a Master’s degree if there are academic grounds for this.]3 A doctoral student shall choose a supervisor in the relevant field and take specialised courses as per further rules on organisation of study set by the Faculty for each subject. A study schedule shall be devised in consultation with a supervisor, to be approved by the Faculty. Student progression shall be evaluated by means deemed satisfactory by the Faculty.

A doctoral student shall select a research topic in consultation with the supervisor and draw up a schedule describing how the project shall be completed. This schedule shall be submitted to the Faculty for approval. If the Faculty approves the schedule, research may commence under the supervisor’s direction. The doctoral student shall conclude the research project by writing a comprehensive doctoral thesis, under the supervisor’s direction. A principal supervisor is not permitted to sit on the evaluation committee for the thesis. The thesis must be judged and defended in accordance with University regulation on doctoral theses and doctoral defences.

The Faculty shall set any further rules on doctoral study, to be approved by the University council, [cf. paragraph 2.]4

1Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 497/2011.
2Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 1305/2011.
3Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 600/2012.
4Amended by Article 8 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.

5Amended by Article 8 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 112.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BA degree in the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies shall be arranged such that a student can complete the programme within three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA degree is eight semesters (four years) from the time of registration in the Faculty. Normal student progression, however, is based on the completion, each academic year, of at least three-fourths of the credit total defined in Article 53 as full-time study. The Faculty may set further requirements concerning student progression in individual subjects.

Teaching for Master's degrees shall be arranged such that a full-time student can complete the programme within two years, following completion of a BA degree. Students studying full-time for a Master's degree must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. Each academic year, part-time students must complete at least half of the credits required for full-time study, as per Article 55, and must complete the programme no later than four years after enrolling.

The Faculty may grant a student an extension of up to one year beyond the time limits set forth in paragraphs 1 and 2, or authorise a break from study, if circumstances so warrant. Otherwise, on failing to complete the programme within prescribed time limits, the student shall forfeit the right to continue study at the Faculty. A student may apply for re-admission and to have previously completed courses evaluated for credit.

Assessment may involve written and/or oral examinations, practical exercises, assignments or essays. If there are two or more examination components for a course, a member of teaching staff may, with the approval of the Faculty, determine that a student not be considered to have passed the examination without having achieved the minimum grade for the entire course in each of the specific examination components. Such a decision shall be announced at the beginning of the course. The final deadline for handing in essays and assignments shall be the last teaching week of each semester unless otherwise stated in the study schedule.

A student’s performance in practical work shall be assessed by the member of teaching staff responsible for it. Teaching staff must submit written reports to the University Student Registration, and these shall be included with the graduation certificate. Four grades shall be given: excellent, good, satisfactory, unsatisfactory. A student receiving the grade unsatisfactory is not considered to have completed the practical work. Grades for practical work shall not count towards the final grade.

Final theses/projects are subject to rules set by the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties.

A student cannot graduate with a degree from the Faculty without at least half of the total credits for a programme having been completed within the Faculty.

FACULTY OF ICELANDIC AND COMPARATIVE CULTURAL STUDIES
Article 113.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BA in: Art History and Art Theory, Comparative Literature, Creative Writing, Film Studies, General Linguistics, Icelandic, Icelandic as a Second Language and Sign Language Linguistics. Teaching in a minor subject may also be offered, as further determined by the Faculty.
  2. MA in: [Art History and Art Theory,]3 Comparative Literature, [Creative Writing,]2 Cultural Studies, General Linguistics, Icelandic Linguistics, Icelandic Literature, Icelandic Studies, Language Technology, Medieval Icelandic Studies, Practical Editorship and Theory of Publication, and Teaching Icelandic. Also MA in Applied Translation Studies, Conference Interpreting, [Second Language Studies]5 and Translation Studies in cooperation with [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures,]6 cf. paragraph 1, Article 109.
  3. Doctorate in: those fields for which the Faculty deems the necessary facilities and expertise to be available.]1

The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's and doctoral study, in accordance with this Regulation, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies comprises the following departments, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation: Icelandic, Icelandic as a Second Language, Cultural Studies.]1

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty shall make further decisions regarding the division of subjects into courses and their weighting in credits, the order in which courses shall be taken, and which courses are mandatory. If specific difficulties arise in the teaching of a particular subject, the Faculty may decide to discontinue teaching the subject.

The Faculty may run short practical courses at the undergraduate level, cf. the provisions of Article 55 of this Regulation. The Faculty may also offer supplementary study following the completion of a qualifying university degree. In addition to teaching for the degrees listed above, the Faculty may organise various courses within the Faculty or in association with other faculties.

A BA degree shall require at least 180 credits. A student shall select a major from the fields of study listed in paragraph 1, and complete at least 120 credits in that field. A student must also complete either 60 additional credits in the major or 60 credits in a minor chosen from other subjects within the School of Humanities. The final thesis shall account for at least 10 credits. A student may also complete a BA with two majors by completing at least 120 credits, including a thesis, in each field of study. A student may, with the Faculty’s permission, take a minor subject or individual courses in another faculty.

[On completion of a BA, a student may apply to begin a Master’s programme in the major subject of the BA.]6 The student is required to have completed the BA with a first class grade. Under special circumstances, a student may be granted an exemption from the minimum grade requirement. Students not satisfying the aforementioned requirements may apply to begin a Master’s degree with the Faculty, on the condition of having previously completed an equivalent degree and fulfilling other requirements stipulated by the Faculty. Details of these requirements are stipulated in the rules for organisation of study for individual programmes within the Faculty.

An MA degree shall, as a rule, require at least 120 credits. The final thesis shall have a minimum credit value of 30 credits and a maximum of 60 credits. A student shall select an MA thesis topic in conformity with Faculty rules. Further guidelines concerning the proportion of courses in a subject, as well as the weighting of essays and individual courses, shall be found in the rules for organisation of study approved by the Faculty for each programme.

The Faculty shall set any further rules on Master's study, to be approved by the University council, cf. paragraph 6. These rules may provide for programmes run by the Faculty jointly with other faculties or universities, or programmes requiring at least 90 credits for a Master’s degree. For such study programmes run jointly by the Faculty with other faculties or universities, a specialist council or board of study may be entrusted with the role otherwise held by the Faculty. Diploma studies at the Master’s level (for 30 or 60 credits) may also be offered. Such studies may be counted towards a Master’s degree in accordance with detailed provisions in the rules for organisation of study.

Upon completion of an MA from the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies with a first class grade, a student may apply for admission to doctoral study within the Faculty. Upon completion of a Master’s degree or other equivalent degree from another University of Iceland faculty or other universities recognised by the Faculty, with the equivalent of a first class grade, a student may apply for admission to doctoral study within the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies. A student’s qualifications shall be evaluated with respect to the major subject of the doctorate. A student will be required to meet study requirements ensuring adequate preparation to undertake doctoral studies in the respective field.

A doctorate shall, as a rule, require at least 240 credits following the completion of a Master's degree. Doctorates are organised as four-year programmes, but it is possible to complete a doctorate within a shorter period if it is undertaken full-time for the whole year. At the commencement of doctoral studies, the Faculty’s research-based study committee shall, in consultation with the student, assign the student a supervisor in the relevant field. The student shall plan a schedule for completing the general component of the doctorate in consultation with a supervisor, in accordance with detailed rules for organisation of study set by the Faculty for each subject. The research-based study committee shall confirm the study schedule; student progression shall be evaluated by means deemed satisfactory by the committee.

A doctoral student shall select a research topic in consultation with the supervisor and draw up a schedule describing how the project shall be completed. This schedule shall be submitted to the Faculty’s research-based study committee for approval. If the committee approves the schedule, research may commence under the supervisor’s direction. The doctoral student shall conclude the research project by writing a comprehensive doctoral thesis, under the supervisor’s direction. The thesis must be judged and defended in accordance with University regulation on doctoral theses and doctoral defences.

The Faculty shall set any further rules on doctoral study, to be approved by the University council, [cf. paragraph 2.]4

1Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 262/2010.
2Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 497/2011.
3Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1305/2011.
4Amended by Article 9 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.
5Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1087/2015.

6Amended by Article 9 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 114.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BA degree in the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies shall be arranged such that a student can complete the programme within three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA degree is eight semesters (four years) from the time of registration in the Faculty. Normal student progression, however, is based on the completion, each academic year, of at least three-fourths of the credit total defined in Article 53. The Faculty may set further requirements concerning student progression in individual subjects.

[Teaching for Master's degree shall be arranged such that a full-time student can complete the programme within two years, following completion of a BA degree.]1 Students studying full-time for a Master's degree must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. Each academic year, part-time students must complete at least half of the credits required for full-time study, as per Article 53, and must complete the programme no later than four years after enrolling.

The Faculty may grant a student an extension of up to one year beyond the time limits set forth in paragraphs 1 and 2, or authorise a break from study, if circumstances so warrant. Otherwise, on failing to complete the programme within prescribed time limits, the student shall forfeit the right to continue study at the Faculty. A student may apply for re-admission and to have previously completed courses evaluated for credit.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies.

Assessment may involve written and/or oral examinations, practical exercises, assignments or essays. If there are two or more examination components for a course, a member of teaching staff may, with the approval of the Faculty, determine that a student not be considered to have passed the examination without having achieved the minimum grade for the entire course in each of the specific examination components. Such a decision shall be announced at the beginning of the course.

The minimum passing grade required in subjects in the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies is 5.0. The Faculty may set higher minimum grade requirements in individual subjects. To graduate from the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies, a student must achieve an average grade of 6.0.

In order to graduate with a degree from the Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies, at least half of the total credits for a programme must have been completed within the Faculty.

1Amended by Article 10 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

FACULTY OF HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY
Article 115.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of History and Philosophy shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BA in: Archaeology, History and Philosophy. Teaching in a minor subject may also be offered, as further determined by the Faculty.
  2. MA in: [Applied Archaeology,]3 Applied Ethics (health and life ethics, work ethics, environmental and natural ethics, and business ethics), Applied Studies in Culture and Communication, Archaeology, History, History Teaching, Medieval Studies, Philosophy and Philosophy Teaching. [Also MA in: European Languages, History and Culture in collaboration with [the Faculty of Languages and Cultures,]6 cf. paragraph 1, Article 109, [and History of Ideas and Science in collaboration with the Faculty of Physical Sciences.]5]2
  3. Doctorate in: those fields for which the Faculty deems the necessary facilities and expertise to be available.]1

The Faculty shall set further rules on Master's and doctoral study, in accordance with this Regulation, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The Faculty is divided into three departments (cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation): the Department of Archaeology, the Department of History and the Department of Philosophy.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty shall make further decisions regarding the division of subjects into courses and their weighting in credits, the order in which courses shall be taken, and which courses are mandatory. If specific difficulties arise in the teaching of a particular subject, the Faculty may decide to discontinue teaching the subject.

The Faculty may run short practical courses at the undergraduate level, cf. the provisions of Article 55 of this Regulation. The Faculty may also offer supplementary study following the completion of a qualifying university degree. In addition to teaching for the degrees listed above, the Faculty may organise various courses within the Faculty or in association with other faculties.

A BA degree shall require at least 180 credits. A student shall select a major from the fields of study listed in paragraph 1, and complete at least 120 credits in that field. A student must also complete either 60 additional credits in the major or 60 credits in a minor chosen from other subjects within the School of Humanities. [...]6 A student may also complete a BA with two majors by completing at least 120 credits [...]6 in each field of study. A student may, with the Faculty’s permission, take a minor subject or individual courses in another faculty.

[On completion of a BA, a student may apply to begin a Master’s programme in the major subject of the BA. The student is required to have completed the BA with a first class grade and if applying for an MA in Archaeology, History or Philosophy the student must have completed a BA thesis of at least 10 credits.]6 Under special circumstances, a student may be granted an exemption from the minimum grade requirement. Students not satisfying the aforementioned requirements may apply to begin a Master’s degree with the Faculty, on the condition of having previously completed an equivalent degree and fulfilling other requirements stipulated by the Faculty. Details of these requirements are stipulated in the rules for organisation of study for individual programmes within the Faculty.

An MA degree shall, as a rule, require at least 120 credits. The MA thesis shall have a minimum credit value of 30 credits and a maximum of 60 credits. A student shall select an MA thesis topic in conformity with Faculty rules. Further guidelines concerning the proportion of courses in a subject, as well as the weighting of essays and individual courses, shall be found in the rules for organisation of study approved by the Faculty for each programme.

The Faculty shall set any further rules on Master's study, to be approved by the University council, cf. paragraph 5. These rules may provide for programmes run by the Faculty jointly with other faculties or universities, or programmes requiring at least 90 credits for a Master’s degree. For such study programmes run jointly by the Faculty with other faculties or universities, a specialist council or board of study may be entrusted with the role otherwise held by the Faculty. Diploma studies at the Master’s level (for 30 or 60 credits) may also be offered. Such studies may be counted towards a Master’s degree in accordance with detailed provisions in the rules for organisation of study.

Upon completion of an MA from the Faculty of History and Philosophy with a first class grade, a student may apply for admission to doctoral study within the Faculty. Upon completion of a Master’s degree or other equivalent degree from another University of Iceland faculty or other universities recognised by the Faculty, with the equivalent of a first class grade, a student may apply for admission to doctoral study within the Faculty of History and Philosophy. A student’s qualifications shall be evaluated with respect to the major subject of the doctorate. A student will be required to meet study requirements ensuring adequate preparation to undertake doctoral studies in the respective field.

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits following the completion of a Master's degree. A student may take up to 240 credits as part of a doctorate following completion of a Master’s degree if there are academic grounds for this. At the commencement of doctoral studies, the Faculty’s postgraduate study committee shall, in consultation with the student, assign the student a supervisor in the relevant field. The student shall plan a schedule for completing the general component of the doctorate in consultation with a supervisor, in accordance with detailed rules for organisation of study set by the Faculty for each subject. The postgraduate study committee shall confirm the study schedule; student progression shall be evaluated by means deemed satisfactory by the committee.

A doctoral student shall select a research topic in consultation with the supervisor and draw up a schedule describing how the project shall be completed. This schedule shall be submitted to the Faculty’s postgraduate study committee for approval. If the committee approves the schedule, research may commence under the supervisor’s direction. The doctoral student shall conclude the research project by writing a comprehensive doctoral thesis, under the supervisor’s direction. The thesis must be judged and defended in accordance with University regulation on doctoral theses and doctoral defences.

The Faculty shall set any further rules on doctoral study, to be approved by the University council, [cf. paragraph 2.]4

1Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 497/2011.
2Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1305/2011.
3Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 1233/2013.
4Amended by Article 10 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.
5Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1156/2015.

6Amended by Article 11 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

Article 116.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BA degree in the Faculty of History and Philosophy shall be arranged such that a student can complete the programme within three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA degree is eight semesters (four years) from the time of registration in the Faculty. Normal student progression, however, is based on the completion, each academic year, of at least three-fourths of the credit total defined in Article 53. The Faculty may set further requirements concerning student progression in individual subjects.

[Teaching for Master's degree shall be arranged such that a full-time student can complete the programme within two years, following completion of a BA degree.]1 Students studying full-time for a Master's degree must have completed the programme no later than three years after enrolling. Each academic year, part-time students must complete at least half of the credits required for full-time study, as per Article 53, and must complete the programme no later than four years after enrolling.

The Faculty may grant a student an extension of up to one year beyond the time limits set forth in paragraphs 1 and 2, or authorise a break from study, if circumstances so warrant. Otherwise, on failing to complete the programme within prescribed time limits, the student shall forfeit the right to continue study at the Faculty. A student may apply for re-admission and to have previously completed courses evaluated for credit.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of History and Philosophy.

Assessment may involve written and/or oral examinations, practical exercises, assignments or essays. If there are two or more examination components for a course, a department may, at the recommendation of a member of staff, determine that a student not be considered to have passed the examination without having achieved the minimum grade for the entire course in each of the specific examination components. Such a decision shall be announced no later than by the beginning of the course.

The minimum passing grade required in subjects in the Faculty of History and Philosophy is 5.0. The Faculty may set higher minimum grade requirements in individual subjects. To graduate from the Faculty of History and Philosophy, a student must achieve an average grade of 6.0.

In order to graduate with a degree from the Faculty of History and Philosophy, at least half of the total credits for a programme must have been completed within the Faculty.

1Amended by Article 12 of Regulation no. 1154/2016.

CHAPTER XIII
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

The faculties of the School of Education are: the Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education; the Faculty of Teacher Education; and the Faculty of Education Studies.

Faculties shall work in close cooperation with each other in order to make optimal use of human and financial resources, facilities, instruments and equipment in the interests of furthering and diversifying education and research.

The School of Education and its faculties shall likewise encourage close collaboration with University central administration and other University schools and faculties.

The provisions of Chapter II of this Regulation shall apply concerning school and faculty administration and other items pertaining to these same rules. Admission requirements for individual faculties and study programmes shall be as provided for in rules established by the University Council, cf. Article 47 of this Regulation. The University Council shall also establish rules on University institutes and Master’s and doctoral programmes for each faculty.

In organising study and research within the School of Education, the requirements of the relevant disciplines or programmes will also be taken into consideration. In order to meet these requirements, study components are divided between the School's faculties and teaching staff assigned accordingly, cf. Articles 17 and 32. The school dean shall appoint special boards of study, representing those faculties involved, to manage issues relating to the programme, MA or doctoral studies, in a comparable manner as that which applies to interdisciplinary studies, cf. Articles 53 and 62. Interdisciplinary study within the School is under the auspices of the governing board of the School in consultation with faculties.

The School of Education shall appoint a doctoral board to oversee doctoral study, in conformity with further rules set by the School governing board.

FACULTY OF SPORT, LEISURE STUDIES AND SOCIAL EDUCATION
Article 117.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BA in: Leisure Studies, and Social Education.
  2. BS in: Sport and Health Sciences.
  3. M.Ed. in: Sport and Health Sciences, Leisure Studies, and Social Education.
  4. MA in: Social Education.
  5. MS in: Sport and Health Sciences.
  6. Doctorate in: those fields for which the Faculty deems the necessary facilities and expertise to be available.

The Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education comprises the following departments, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation: the Department of Leisure Studies, the Department of Social Education and the Department of Sport and Health Sciences.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

The Faculty may run short practical courses at the undergraduate level, cf. the provisions of Article 55 of this Regulation. The Faculty may also offer supplementary study following the completion of a qualifying university degree.

Study at the Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education is organised either as on-campus study, distance learning or as a flexible programme combining on-campus and distance learning. The Faculty shall set further rules concerning studies, which shall appear in the course catalogue. There, the objectives, content and main subject material of a study programme shall be specified, including vocational training in the field, when applicable. The mode of study, teaching methods and assessment shall also be explained.

Subjects defined as major subjects may also be offered as minor subjects, as may other sport, leisure studies or social education subjects, as further determined by the Faculty.

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation. Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

The BA in Social Education shall require at least 180 credits.

Legislation and regulation on professional qualifications are taken into consideration when organising study programmes in social education.

The BS in Sport and Health Sciences shall require at least 180 credits.

The BA in Leisure Studies shall require at least 180 credits: 120 credits in a major subject and 60 in a minor subject.

An M.Ed. degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BA, B.Ed. or BS degree from a study programme within the Faculty or in a related subject. Such study may be arranged as a research-based programme, with a final project of at least 30 credits.

MA and MS degrees shall require 120 credits following completion of a BA, B.Ed. or BS degree. Such study is arranged as a research-based programme, with a final project of at least 30 credits.

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits, in accordance with the provisions of this Regulation.

The Diploma in Social Education is an independent 30-credit postgraduate programme. Following completion of this programme, students may apply to continue in the MA programme in Social Education, provided they have graduated with a first class grade (at least 7.25).

The Diploma in Health and Health Education is an independent 30-credit postgraduate programme. Following completion of this programme, students may apply to continue in the MS or M.Ed. programme in Sport and Health Sciences, provided they have graduated with a first class grade (at least 7.25).

[The Diploma in Leisure Studies is an independent 60-credit undergraduate programme.]2

Students may be admitted to specially organised postgraduate and supplementary study programmes every other year.]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 192/2012.
2Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 21/2015.

Article 118.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for BA and BS programmes shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA or BS degree is eight semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

[A student in the BA programme in Leisure Studies may take a minor subject in another faculty, having received the approval of the Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education and the faculty offering the subject in question.]1

Assessment may involve written, oral or practical examinations, assignments or essays. Teaching staff may evaluate class work as part of assessment in particular courses, subject to Faculty approval. If student contribution during classes forms part of assessment, 80% attendance of such classes may be made compulsory. Attendance may not be made compulsory unless contributions made during class are evaluated as part of the final grade, in which case this shall be clearly specified in the syllabus. A minimum grade of 5.0 is required to pass each individual course. In courses where assessment is based on both examinations and assignments, a minimum grade of 5.0 is required in both components. If there are two or more examination components in a course, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of a member of teaching staff, require that students achieve a specific minimum grade in each of the components. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

In the case of individual supervision, a supervisor shall evaluate the final project and provide a review. In the case of groups, supervisors shall divide each group’s work between them or jointly evaluate the projects and provide a review of them. Special rules concerning the assessment of final Master’s and doctoral projects are set by the Faculty, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The School of Education shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in certain courses or subjects, should there be cause to do so. In such cases, rules concerning the process of student selection shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Sport, Leisure Studies and Social Education.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 192/2012.

FACULTY OF TEACHER EDUCATION
Article 119.  [Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Teacher Education shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. B.Ed. in: [Preschool Teacher Education, Compulsory School Teacher Education and Vocational Education and Training (VET) Pedagogy.]2
  2. M.Ed. in: [Preschool Teacher Education, Preschool Education, Compulsory School Teaching, Compulsory School Teacher Education, [ Graduate Education for Compulsory School Teachers,]5 Teaching and Learning Studies and Upper Secondary School Teaching.]2
  3. MA in: [Teaching and Learning Studies.]2
  4. Doctorate in: Education, Ph.D. or Ed.D., and in those fields for which the Faculty deems the necessary facilities and expertise to be available.

[The Faculty of Teacher Education comprises three departments, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation: the Department of Preschool Teacher Education, the Department of Compulsory School Teacher Education and the Department of Upper Secondary School and University Teaching.]2

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

The Faculty may run short courses at the undergraduate level, cf. the provisions of Article 55 of this Regulation. The Faculty may also offer supplementary study following the completion of a qualifying university degree.

Study at the Faculty of Teacher Education is organised either as on-campus study, distance learning or as a flexible programme combining on-campus and distance learning. The Faculty shall set further rules concerning studies, which shall appear in the course catalogue. There, the objectives, content and main subject material of a study programme shall be specified, including vocational training in the field, when applicable. The mode of study, teaching methods and assessment shall also be explained.

Subjects defined as major subjects may also be offered as minor subjects, as may other subjects within the Faculty of Teacher Education, as further determined by the Faculty.

A B.Ed. degree shall require at least 180 credits. 

An M.Ed. degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a B.Ed. degree from a study programme within the Faculty or a BA or BS degree in a related subject. Such study may be arranged as a research-based programme, with a final project of at least [30]2 credits.

An MA degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a B.Ed. degree from a study programme within the Faculty or a BA or BS degree in a related subject. Such study is arranged as a research-based programme, with a final project of at least 40 credits.

Students may select a field of specialisation within a Master´s study programme.

An Ed.D. in Education shall require at least 180 credits following the completion of a Master's degree. A Ph.D. in Education shall require 180-240 credits following the completion of a Master's degree. 

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Teacher Education and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation. Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Diploma in Teaching Studies for Certified Master Tradesmen is an independent 60-credit undergraduate programme.

The Diploma in Upper Secondary School Teaching is an independent 60-credit programme, following the completion of a [MA or MS degree]2 or an equivalent university degree. The Diploma in Teaching Studies for Higher Education is an independent 30-credit postgraduate programme.

The Diploma in Teaching and Learning Studies is an independent 60-credit postgraduate programme.

[The Diploma in Mathematics Education for Working Upper Secondary School Teachers is an independent 60-credit programme at the Matser's level.]4

[The Diploma in Preschool Studies is an independent 120-credit undergraduate programme.]3

A supplementary diploma may be evaluated towards a Master's degree, on the condition that admission requirements are met.

Legislation and regulation on professional qualifications are taken into consideration when organising study programmes in the Faculty of Teacher Education.]1

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 552/2011.
2Amended by Article 11 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.
3Amended by Article 5 of Regulation no. 138/2014.
4Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 301/2015.
5Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 161/2016.

Article 120.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for BA and B.Ed. programmes shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA or B.Ed. degree is eight semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

A student may take a minor subject in another faculty, having received the approval of the Faculty of Teacher Education and the faculty offering the subject in question.

Assessment may involve written, oral or practical examinations, assignments or essays. Teaching staff may evaluate class work as part of assessment in particular courses, subject to Faculty approval. If student contribution during classes forms part of assessment, 80% attendance of such classes may be made compulsory. Attendance may not be made compulsory unless contributions made during class are evaluated as part of the final grade, in which case this shall be clearly specified in the syllabus. A minimum grade of 5.0 is required to pass each individual course. In courses where assessment is based on both examinations and assignments, a minimum grade of 5.0 is required in both components. If there are two or more examination components in a course, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of a member of teaching staff, require that students achieve a specific minimum grade in each of the components. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

In the case of individual supervision, a supervisor shall evaluate the final project and provide a review. In the case of groups, supervisors shall divide each group’s work between them or jointly evaluate the projects and provide a review of them. Special rules concerning the assessment of final Master’s and doctoral projects are set by the Faculty, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The School of Education shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Teacher Education, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in certain courses or subjects, should there be cause to do so. In such cases, rules concerning the process of student selection shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Teacher Education.

FACULTY OF EDUCATION STUDIES
Article 121.  [Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Education Studies shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BA in: International Studies in Education; Education Studies.
  2. MA in: International Studies in Education; Risk, Resiliency and Prevention; [Parent Education;]2 Leadership, Innovation and Management; Life skills, Identities and Wellbeing; Democracy, Equality and Multiculturalism; Evaluation Studies; Adult Education; Special Education; Educational Administration; Education Studies; Development, Language and Literacy.
  3. M.Ed. in: [Parent Education;]2 Leadership, Innovation and Management; Life skills, Identities and Wellbeing; Democracy, Equality and Multiculturalism; Adult Education; Special Education; Educational Administration; Education Studies.
  4. Doctorate in: Education, Ph.D. or Ed.D., and in those fields for which the Faculty deems the necessary facilities and expertise to be available.

[The Faculty of Education Studies comprises three departments, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation: the Department of Educational Administration and Evaluation Studies, the Department of Education Studies and Diversity and the Department of Psychology in Educational Science.]2

Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

Study at the Faculty of Education Studies is organised either as on-campus study, distance learning or as a flexible programme combining on-campus and distance learning. The Faculty shall set further rules concerning studies, which shall appear in the course catalogue. There, the objectives, content and main subject material of a study programme shall be specified, including vocational training in the field, when applicable. The mode of study, teaching methods and assessment shall also be explained.

Subjects defined as major subjects may also be offered as minor subjects, as may other subjects within the Faculty of Education Studies, as further determined by the Faculty.

A BA degree shall require at least 180 credits: 120 credits in a major subject and 60 in a minor subject.

An M.Ed. degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BA degree from a study programme within the Faculty or a BA, B.Ed. or BS degree in a related subject. Such study may be arranged as a research-based programme, with a final project of at least 30 credits.

An MA degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BA degree from a study programme within the Faculty or a BA, B.Ed. or BS degree in a related subject. Such study is arranged as a research-based programme, with a final project of at least 40 credits.

Students may select a field of specialisation within a Master´s study programme.

A 60-credit supplementary diploma may be awarded to students upon completing the first part of a Master's programme, provided that this is provided for in the course catalogue.

[The Diploma in Education Studies is an independet 60-credit programme at the Master's level.]3

An Ed.D. in Education shall require at least 180 credits. A Ph.D. in Education shall require 180-240 credits.

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Education Studies and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation. Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

Legislation and regulation on professional qualifications are taken into consideration when organising study programmes in the Faculty of Education Studies.]1

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 552/2011.
2Amended by Article 6 of Regulation no. 138/2014.
3Amended by Article 13 of Regulation no. 1095/2014.

Article 122.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BA programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BA degree is eight semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

A student may take a minor subject in another faculty, having received the approval of the Faculty of Education Studies and the faculty offering the subject in question.

Assessment may involve written, oral or practical examinations, assignments or essays. Teaching staff may evaluate class work as part of assessment in particular courses, subject to Faculty approval. If student contribution during classes forms part of assessment, 80% attendance of such classes may be made compulsory. Attendance may not be made compulsory unless contributions made during class are evaluated as part of the final grade, in which case this shall be clearly specified in the syllabus. A minimum grade of 5.0 is required to pass each individual course. In courses where assessment is based on both examinations and assignments, a minimum grade of 5.0 is required in both components. If there are two or more examination components in a course, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of a member of teaching staff, require that students achieve a specific minimum grade in each of the components. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

In the case of individual supervision, a supervisor shall evaluate the final project and provide a review. In the case of groups, supervisors shall divide each group’s work between them or jointly evaluate the projects and provide a review of them. Special rules concerning the assessment of final Master’s and doctoral projects are set by the Faculty, to be approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

The School of Education shall, on an annual basis and at the recommendation of the Faculty of Education Studies, submit a reasoned proposal to the University Council on limits to the number of students in certain courses or subjects, should there be cause to do so. In such cases, rules concerning the process of student selection shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Education Studies.

CHAPTER XIV
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND NATURAL SCIENCES

The faculties of the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences are: the Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science; the Faculty of Earth Sciences; the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences; the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering; the Faculty of Physical Sciences; and the Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Faculties shall work in close cooperation with each other in order to make optimal use of human and financial resources, facilities, instruments and equipment in the interests of furthering and diversifying education and research.

The School of Engineering and Natural Sciences and its faculties shall likewise encourage close collaboration with University central administration and other University schools and faculties.

The provisions of Chapter II of this Regulation shall apply concerning school and faculty administration and other items pertaining to these same rules. Admission requirements for individual faculties and study programmes shall be as provided for in rules established by the University Council, cf. Article 47 of this Regulation. The University Council shall also establish rules on University institutes and Master’s and doctoral programmes for each faculty.

FACULTY OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
Article 123  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BS in: Chemical Engineering, Software Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, and Mechanical and Industrial Engineering.
  2. MS in the following engineering subjects: Financial Engineering, Software Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Bioengineering, Computational Engineering, Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. Also MS in Bioinformatics, in cooperation with the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences.
  3. Ph.D. in: Software Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Bioengineering, Computational Engineering, Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering, as well as Bioinformatics in cooperation with the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences.
  4. [The Faculty shall also provide teaching for the Master's and doctorate in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.]2]1

Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

A BS degree shall require at least 180 credits.

An MS degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BS degree from the Faculty. The Faculty may, however, confer an MS in Computer Science on completion of a 90-credit programme.

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits. 

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 186/2013.
2Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 430/2015.

Article 124.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BS programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BS degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

A student shall register in a major subject upon commencing study. Students wishing to deviate from the organisation of study provided for in the course catalogue must submit a proposed study schedule to the Faculty for approval. The same applies if a student wishes to amend the original study schedule.

Students may not commence studies in specific courses at the Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science without having successfully completed those courses specified in the course catalogue as prerequisites for such studies. In special circumstances, however, the Faculty may deviate from this rule.

The Faculty may set further rules on assignment and attendance requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Engineering students must have completed certain vocational training as part of a BS degree. Training shall broadly consist of work in the field the student intends to pursue, as per instructions in the course catalogue.

As a rule, vocational training shall take place in the first three years of study. However, certain work undertaken since the student turned 18 may be recognised, when at least half the training took place after the commencement of University studies. The period of training must be at least 16 weeks.

The Faculty may recognise participation in practical courses as part of the training requirement.

In calculating grades, a student’s performance on tests and assignments outside of the prescribed examination period may be taken into account and a special grade be awarded for such, the term grade.

To pass an examination in a course, an undergraduate student must achieve an examination and overall grade of at least 5.0.

To pass an examination in a course, a postgraduate student must achieve an examination and overall grade of at least 6.0.

Each member of teaching staff shall determine the weighting of the term grade for his or her course, taking into consideration the Faculty’s rules in this respect, and notify students of such at the beginning of the semester.

A student who fails to achieve the required grade for a course may resit the examination once. A third examination is permitted only with the special permission of the Faculty. Those students resitting an examination must, in each case, sit the examination the same way it is held for other students unless the Faculty determines otherwise.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science.

Article 125.  MPM programme

The Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science may, with the approval of the University Council, confer the degree of MPM, upon the completion of 90 credits of continuing education study offered by the Faculty, provided this complies with the provisions of Article 64 of this Regulation on continuing education offered by faculties.

For admission to the MPM programme, a student must have completed a BA, BS, B.Ed. or equivalent university degree and, as a rule, have three years of employment experience.

The Faculty shall establish more detailed rules on admission requirements, study programmes and study requirements in resolutions on the programme, to be approved by the University Council. 

FACULTY OF EARTH SCIENCES
Article 126.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Earth Sciences shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BS in: Geophysics and Geology.
  2. MS in Geophysics, Geology and Earth Sciences.
  3. Ph.D. in Geophysics, Geology and Earth Sciences.
  4. The Faculty shall also provide teaching for the Master's in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.]1

Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty shall make further decisions regarding the division of subjects into courses, their weighting and study level.

Subjects defined as major subjects may also be offered as minor subjects, as further determined by the Faculty. Furthermore, the Faculty may offer a supplementary 60-credit programme following completion of a BS degree, which shall confer a special qualification.

A BS degree shall require at least 180 credits.

An MS degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BS degree from the Faculty.

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits.

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Earth Sciences and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

1Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 1087/2015.

Article 127.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BS programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BS degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

A student shall register in a major subject upon commencing study. Students wishing to deviate from the organisation of study provided for in the course catalogue must submit a proposed study schedule to the Faculty for approval. The same applies if a student wishes to amend the original study schedule.

The Faculty may determine that a student may not enrol in a course without having previously acquired the right to take the examination, or having passed examinations in specific courses.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Practical courses may be held outside of normal teaching hours.

To pass an examination in a course, an undergraduate student must achieve a grade of at least 5.0.

To pass an examination in a course, a postgraduate student must achieve a grade of at least 6.0.

A student who fails to achieve the required grade for a course may resit the examination, in accordance with general University rules. Those students resitting an examination must, in each case, sit the examination the same way it is held for other students unless the Faculty determines otherwise.

In calculating grades, a student’s performance on tests and assignments outside of the prescribed examination period may be taken into account and a special grade be awarded for such, the term grade. The Faculty shall, at the recommendation of teaching staff, determine the weighting of term grades, and this shall be specified in the course catalogue. When publishing grades, the examination grade and term grade shall also be shown separately. In an examination subject for which a term grade is given, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of teaching staff, stipulate that for either grade, a student shall be considered to have failed the examination if this grade is lower than the minimum grade required for the examination subject as a whole. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Earth Sciences.

FACULTY OF LIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Article 128.  [Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BS in: Tourism Studies, Geography, Biology, and Aquatic and Marine Biology, as well as Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in cooperation with the Faculty of Physical Sciences.
  2. MS in: Tourism Studies, Geography and Biology [as well as Bioinformatics in cooperation with the Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science.]2
  3. Ph.D in: Tourism Studies, Geography and Biology [as well as Bioinformatics in cooperation with the Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science.]2
  4. The Faculty shall also provide teaching for the Master's in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available. Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

The Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences is divided into two departments (cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation): the Department of Biology and the Department of Geography and Tourism Studies.

The Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences and the Faculty of Physical Sciences are jointly responsible for the BS in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which is housed in the Faculty of Physical Sciences within the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The first two years of study are based on joint mandatory courses; during the third year, students must choose a specialisation, either biochemistry or molecular biology. A student shall register for a specialisation at the beginning of the programme, but may change specialisation up until the end of the fourth semester. A student choosing to specialise in biochemistry shall graduate from the Faculty of Physical Sciences, whereas a student choosing to specialise in molecular biology shall graduate from the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences.

The provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation apply to the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in all other aspects except that teaching staff who have a seat in a department within the Faculty of Physical Sciences or the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, including the right to vote, may also have a seat including the right to vote in this department, as determined by the dean of the School.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty shall make further decisions regarding the division of subjects into courses, their weighting and study level.

Subjects defined as major subjects for BS degrees may also be offered as minor subjects, as further determined by the Faculty. Furthermore, the Faculty may offer a supplementary 60-credit programme following completion of a BS degree, which shall confer a special qualification.

Departments shall explain organisation of study and mandatory courses within a major subject in the course catalogue. Course selection is subject to departmental approval.

A BS degree shall require at least 180 credits.

An MS degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BS degree from the Faculty.

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits.

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.]1

1Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 497/2011.
2Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 186/2013.

Article 129.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BS programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BS degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

A student shall register in a major subject upon commencing study. Students wishing to deviate from the organisation of study provided for in the course catalogue must submit a proposed study schedule to the Faculty for approval. The same applies if a student wishes to amend the original study schedule.

The Faculty may determine that a student may not enrol in a course without having previously acquired the right to take the examination, or having passed examinations in specific courses.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Practical courses may be held outside of normal teaching hours.

To pass an examination in a course, an undergraduate student must achieve a grade of at least 5.0.

To pass an examination in a course, a postgraduate student must achieve a grade of at least 6.0.

A student who fails to achieve the required grade for a course may resit the examination, in accordance with general University rules. Those students resitting an examination must, in each case, sit the examination the same way it is held for other students unless the Faculty determines otherwise.

In calculating grades, a student’s performance on tests and assignments outside of the prescribed examination period may be taken into account and a special grade be awarded for such, the term grade. The Faculty shall, at the recommendation of teaching staff, determine the weighting of term grades, and this shall be specified in the course catalogue. When publishing grades, the examination grade and term grade shall also be shown separately. In an examination subject for which a term grade is given, the Faculty may, at the recommendation of teaching staff, stipulate that for either grade, a student shall be considered to have failed the examination if this grade is lower than the minimum grade required for the examination subject as a whole. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences.

FACULTY OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Article 130.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BS in: Electrical and Computer Engineering.
  2. BS in: Mechatronic Engineering Technology, and Energy and Environmental Engineering Technology, taught at Keilir Institute.
  3. MS in: Electrical and Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Engineering.
  4. Ph.D. in: Electrical and Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Engineering.]1

Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

[The BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering shall require at least 180 credits.]1

[The BS in Mechatronic Engineering Technology, and in Energy and Environmental Engineering Technology, shall require at least 220 credits. Study in technology subjects is separate from study in electrical and computer engineering and is conducted in separate premises.]1

[An MS degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the Faculty.]1

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits.

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

1Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 605/2014.

Article 131.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

[Teaching for a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years.]1 The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BS degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. [Teaching for a BS in Mechatronic Engineering Technology, or in Energy and Environmental Engineering Technology shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 220-credit programme in three and a half years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BS degree in a technology subject is ten semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question.1 The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. [Teaching for an MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, or Computer Engineering shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years.]1 The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

A student shall register in a major subject upon commencing study. Students wishing to deviate from the organisation of study provided for in the course catalogue must submit a proposed study schedule to the Faculty for approval. The same applies if a student wishes to amend the original study schedule.

Students may not commence studies in specific courses at the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering without having successfully completed those courses specified in the course catalogue as prerequisites for such studies. In special circumstances, however, the Faculty may deviate from this rule.

The Faculty may set further rules on assignment and attendance requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

In calculating grades, a student’s performance on tests and assignments outside of the prescribed examination period may be taken into account and a special grade be awarded for such, the term grade.

To pass an examination in a course, an undergraduate student must achieve an examination and overall grade of at least 5.0.

To pass an examination in a course, a postgraduate student must achieve an examination and overall grade of at least 6.0.

Each member of teaching staff shall determine the weighting of the term grade for his or her course, taking into consideration the Faculty’s rules in this respect, and notify students of such at the beginning of the semester.

A student who fails to achieve the required grade for a course may resit the examination once. A third examination is permitted only with the special permission of the Faculty. Those students resitting an examination must, in each case, sit the examination the same way it is held for other students unless the Faculty determines otherwise.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

1Amended by Article 3 of Regulation no. 605/2014.

FACULTY OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES
Article 132.  [Subjects, degrees and credits

The Faculty of Physical Sciences shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. [BS in: Physics, Chemistry, Applied Mathematics, Biochemistry and Mathematics, as well as Mathematics and Mathematics Education in cooperation with the School of Education, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in cooperation with the Faculty of Physical Sciences and Engineering Physics in cooperation with other faculties within the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences.]5
  2. MS in: Physics, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Mathematics and [Statistics,]2 [as well as Engineering Physics in cooperation with other faculties within the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences.]3
  3. [Qualification at Master's level, MAS, in Applied Statistics in cooperation with other faculties.]4
  4. Ph.D. in: Physics, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Mathematics and [Statistics.]2
  5. The Faculty shall also provide teaching for the Master's in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.

Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty of Physical Studies comprises four departments, cf. the provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation: the Department of Physics, the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Mathematics, as well as the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, with the Faculty is jointly responsible for the the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences.

The Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences and the Faculty of Physical Sciences are jointly responsible for the BS in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which is housed in the Faculty of Physical Sciences within the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The first two years of study are based on joint mandatory courses; during the third year, students must choose a specialisation, either biochemistry or molecular biology. A student shall register for a specialisation at the beginning of the programme, but may change specialisation up until the end of the fourth semester. A student choosing to specialise in biochemistry shall graduate from the Faculty of Physical Sciences, whereas a student choosing to specialise in molecular biology shall graduate from the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences.

The provisions of Article 21 of this Regulation apply to the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in all other aspects except that teaching staff who have a seat in a department within the Faculty of Physical Sciences or the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, including the right to vote, may also have a seat including the right to vote in this department, as determined by the dean of the School.

The Faculty shall make further decisions regarding the division of subjects into courses, their weighting and study level.

Departments shall explain organisation of study and mandatory courses within a major subject in the course catalogue. Course selection is subject to departmental approval.

Subjects defined as major subjects for BS degrees may also be offered as minor subjects, as further determined by the Faculty. Furthermore, the Faculty may offer a supplementary 60-credit programme following completion of a BS degree, which shall confer a special qualification.

A BS degree shall require at least 180 credits.

An MS degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BS degree from the Faculty.

[The MAS programme in Applied Statistics (Master of Applied Statistics) is a 90 credits interdisciplinary qualification at Master´s level (Cycle 2.1), offered by the Faculty of Physical Studies in cooperation with other faculties, across schools. Academic responsibility for the programme is entrusted to a board of study, representing the schools involved. The Department of Mathematics within the Faculty of Physical Sciences oversees the programme in other respects. Faculties involved in the programme make a special agreement, stipulating provisions on matters such as admission requirements, processing of applications, programme requirements, and the role of the board of study. Students graduate from the Faculty of Physical Sciences or from that collaborating faculty at which the final research project (thesis) is completed in each case.]4

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits. 

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees in the Faculty's subjects is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Physical Sciences and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.]1

1Amended by Article 8 of Regulation no. 497/2011.
2Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 186/2013.
3Amended by Article 7 of Regulation no. 138/2014.
4Amended by Article 4 of Regulation no. 21/2015.
5Amended by Article 2 of Regulation no. 301/2015.

Article 133.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BS programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BS degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

A student shall register in a major subject upon commencing study. Students wishing to deviate from the organisation of study provided for in the course catalogue must submit a proposed study schedule to the department concerned for approval. The same applies if a student wishes to amend the original study schedule.

The Faculty may determine that a student may not enrol in a course without having previously acquired the right to take the examination, or having passed examinations in specific courses.

The Faculty shall set rules on assignment requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

Practical courses may be held outside of normal teaching hours.

To pass an examination in a course, an undergraduate student must achieve a grade of at least 5.0.

To pass an examination in a course, a postgraduate student must achieve a grade of at least 6.0.

A student who fails to achieve the required grade for a course may resit the examination, in accordance with general University rules. Those students resitting an examination must, in each case, sit the examination the same way it is held for other students unless the Faculty determines otherwise.

In calculating grades, a student’s performance on tests and assignments outside of the prescribed examination period may be taken into account and a special grade be awarded for such, the term grade. Each department shall, at the recommendation of teaching staff, determine the weighting of term grades, and this shall be specified in the course catalogue. When publishing grades, the examination grade and term grade shall also be shown separately. In an examination subject for which a term grade is given, a department may, at the recommendation of teaching staff, stipulate that for either grade, a student shall be considered to have failed the examination if this grade is lower than the minimum grade required for the examination subject as a whole. Such a decision shall be specified in the course catalogue.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Physical Sciences.

FACULTY OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
Article 134.  Subjects, degrees and credits

[The Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering shall provide teaching for the following:

  1. BS in Civil and Environmental Engineering.
  2. MS in: Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Civil and Environmental Engineering.
  3. Ph.D. in: Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Environmental Studies.
  4. The Faculty shall also provide teaching for the Master's and doctorate in Environment and Natural Resources and other interdisciplinary programmes in cooperation with other University faculties, where the necessary facilities are available.]1

Descriptions of study programmes shall be published in the course catalogue.

In addition to teaching, the Faculty is responsible for research in its academic fields.

The Faculty determines subjects, their organisation into courses and their weighting.

A BS degree shall require at least 180 credits.

An MS degree shall require 120 credits following completion of a BS degree from the Faculty.

A doctorate shall require at least 180 credits. 

Postgraduate study for Master's and doctoral degrees is organised in accordance with this Regulation and further rules set by the Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering and approved by the University Council, cf. Articles 66-69 of this Regulation.

1Amended by Article 1 of Regulation no. 443/2014.

Article 135.  Student progression, assessment and maximum length of study

Teaching for a BS programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 180-credit programme in three years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a BS degree is nine semesters from the time of registration in the programme in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances. Teaching for a Master’s programme shall be arranged such that a student can complete a 120-credit programme in two years. The maximum length of time permitted for completing a Master's degree is six semesters from the time of registration in the major subject in question. The Faculty may grant exceptions from these time limits, in exceptional circumstances.

A student shall register in a major subject upon commencing study. Students wishing to deviate from the organisation of study provided for in the course catalogue must submit a proposed study schedule to the Faculty for approval. The same applies if a student wishes to amend the original study schedule.

Students may not commence studies in specific courses at the Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering without having successfully completed those courses specified in the course catalogue as prerequisites for such studies. In special circumstances, however, the Faculty may deviate from this rule.

The Faculty may set further rules on assignment and attendance requirements for courses and on minimum performance by students on assignments in order to be eligible for examination.

In calculating grades, a student’s performance on tests and assignments outside of the prescribed examination period may be taken into account and a special grade be awarded for such, the term grade.

To pass an examination in a course, a student must achieve an examination and overall grade of at least 5.0. To complete an MS degree, a student must achieve a weighted average grade of at least 6.0.

Each member of teaching staff shall determine the weighting of the term grade for his or her course, taking into consideration the Faculty’s rules in this respect, and notify students of such at the beginning of the semester.

A student who fails to achieve the required grade for a course may resit the examination once. A third examination is permitted only with the special permission of the Faculty. Those students resitting an examination must, in each case, sit the examination the same way it is held for other students unless the Faculty determines otherwise.

The Faculty shall set rules concerning recognition of prior study for students re-enrolling or transferring from other faculties or universities, or between majors within the Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

CHAPTER XV
PUBLICATION OF REGULATION, PROVISIONS ON AMENDMENTS AND ENTRY INTO FORCE
Article 136.  Establishment and amendment of regulation

This Regulation is established on the basis of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008. This Regulation, as well as other rules set by the University Council on the basis of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions, shall be published in Section B of the Law Gazette (Stjórnartíðindi).

In this Regulation, use is made of the University’s authorisation under Act no. 85/2008 to govern the naming of organisational units within the University. The term fræðasvið (school) is thus used in place of skóli, forseti fræðasviðs (dean of school) in place of forseti skóla, deildarforseti (head of faculty) in place of deildarformaður, stjórn fræðasviðs (school governing board) in place of skólaráð, þing fræðasviðs (school assembly) in place of skólafundur and háskólaþing (University Forum) instead of háskólafundur.

This Regulation may not be amended without the approval of the University Council and, as the case may be, having received the opinion of specific organisational units within the University or student and staff organisations, as appropriate, cf. the provisions of the Act on Public Higher Education Institutions no. 85/2008.

The provisions of legislation and regulation which currently applies for the University of Iceland shall be accessible on the University website.

Article 137  Entry into force

This Regulation shall enter into force 1 July 2009, and at the same time Regulation for the University of Iceland no. 458/2000, with subsequent amendments, is repealed.

Advertisement no. 633/2008 on the new organisational structure of the University of Iceland is also repealed; the provisions therein have been incorporated into this Regulation. In accordance with the final provisions of the Advertisement, all provisions of the Regulation approved at the University Council of the Iceland University of Education, 27 March 2007, are repealed on the entry into force of this Regulation. Regulation no. 985/2008 on the nomination of representatives of the University community and of students to the University Council of the University of Iceland is repealed; the provisions therein have been incorporated into Article 3 of this Regulation. Regulation no. 490/2007 for the University of Iceland Graduate School is also repealed.

Temporary provisions

The following Regulations, established by the University Council regarding institutes within the University of Iceland, remain in effect insofar as they comply with the provisions of Act no. 85/2008 and until the University Council has established new regulation regarding their operations in accordance with the provisions of Articles 25-27 of this Regulation:

Service institutes under the auspices of the University Council
Regulation no. 296/2001 on the University of Iceland Press.
Regulation no. 735/2001 on the University of Iceland Computer Services, cf. Regulation no. 906/2004.
Regulation no. 844/2001 on the University of Iceland Continuing Education Institute, cf. Regulation no. 315/2009 and Regulation no. 895/2005.
Regulation no. 832/2001 on the Research Liaison Office of the University of Iceland.
Regulation no. 176/2003 on the University of Iceland Institute of Research Centres, cf. Regulation no. 488/2007.

Research and service institutes under the auspices of the University Council
Regulation no. 737/2001 on the University of Iceland Centre for Ethics, cf. Regulation no. 889/2007.
Regulation no. 826/2001 on the University of Iceland Institute for Gender, Equality and Difference, cf. Regulation no. 516/2003.
Regulation no. 501/2002 on the University of Iceland Institute of International Affairs.
Regulation no. 500/2002 on the Genetical Committee at the University of Iceland.
Regulation no. 526/2005 on the University of Iceland Institute for Sustainable Development.

Research institutes at the School of Social Sciences
Regulation no. 738/2001 on the University of Iceland Institute of Economic Studies.
Regulation no. 824/2001 on the University of Iceland Institute of Business Research, cf. Regulation no. 806/2008 and Regulation no. 489/2007.
Regulation no. 979/2001 on the University Law Institute, cf. Regulation no. 515/2003.
Regulation no. 495/2002 on the University of Iceland Institute for Public Administration and Politics.
Regulation no. 370/2009 on the University of Iceland Social Science Research Institute.

Research institutes at the School of Health Sciences
Regulation no. 720/2001 on the University of Iceland Institute of Nursing Research.
Regulation no. 734/2001 on the University of Iceland Dental Institute.
Regulation no. 750/2002 on the Icelandic Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Toxicology.
Regulation no. 1047/2003 on the University of Iceland Institute of Physiology.
Regulation no. 825/2004 on the Institute of Nursing Research at the University of Iceland and the Landspítali University Hospital.      
Regulation no. 345/2007 on the University of Iceland Research Institute for Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, cf. Regulation no. 739/2007.

Research institutes at the School of Humanities
Regulation no. 731/2001 on the University of Iceland Institute of Theology, cf. Regulation no. 344/2008.
Regulation no. 281/2006 on the University of Iceland Centre for Research in the Humanities.

Research institutes at the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences
Regulation no. 828/2001 on the University of Iceland Engineering Research Institute.
Regulation no. 978/2001 on the University of Iceland Institute of Biology.
Regulation no. 398/2004 on the University of Iceland Science Institute, cf. Regulation no. 909/2004.

Explanatory provisions

Rules established by the University Council concerning admission requirements, admission of students and organisation of study in particular subjects, including for postgraduate study, shall remain in effect until the University Council has established new rules. The same applies to rules which the University Council has established regarding employees of the University of Iceland. Furthermore, rules regarding the composition and rules of order of the University Forum remain in effect.

The following charters and statutes remain in effect:
Advertisement no. 11/1919 on the charter for the University of Iceland Union Fund.
Charter for the University of Iceland Art Collection no. 276/1980.
Statute of Establishment no. 780/1999 for the University of Iceland Art Collection Benefit Fund.


 

University of Iceland, 16 June 2009

 

Kristín Ingólfsdóttir

Þórður Kristinsson



 

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