University of Iceland

UoI Doctoral Student receives first prize

UoI Doctoral Student receives first prize

Pedram Ghamisi, a UoI doctoral student at the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, recently received the so-called IEEE Mikio Takagi prize; one of the most prestigious prizes a university student can receive in the field of remote sensing. Remote sensing includes research and data processing on the earth’s surface and the ocean, in the atmosphere and in space. The Mikio Takagi prize is awarded to the winner of a science contest at the main conference for scientists that work on remote sensing and classification of surface features in imagery from satellites or aircrafts.
 
A total of 62 doctoral students submitted articles to compete for the IEEE Mikio Takagi prize; ten of whom were chosen for the finals at the 2013 IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium in Melbourne Australia. A selection committee evaluated the articles and the doctoral students’ talks. Pedram Ghamisi, achieved excellent results with his article; The Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images Based on Hidden Markov Random Field and its Expectation-Maximization; where he formulates a novel and effective method in the processing of satellite imagery. Ghamisi’s co-authors are Jón Atli Benediktsson, Pro-rector and Professor in Electric- and Computer Engineering and Magnús Örn Úlfarsson, Associate Professor at the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering.
 
Ghamisi began his doctoral studies at the University of Iceland last August under the supervision of Jón Atli Benediktsson, one of the leading scientists in the field. Ghamisi has been very successful and he has already published some articles in international ISI science journals. His doctoral thesis covers the classification of surface features in satellite imagery; but satellite data plays a key role in our daily life. Emphasis on remote sensing has increased considerably in recent years and the University of Iceland has played a significant role. The work and research of Professor Benediktsson has received world-wide attention. Remote sensing in Iceland has primarily been used in mapping and tracking, evaluating heat and land elevation in geothermal areas and active volcanoes as well as monitoring sea ice and ocean temperature. Regular remote sensing in fisheries may prove extremely important in the future as Iceland’s future and subsistence relies mostly on fishing.
 
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